Courses

Slavic Department Listings

See also the list of past years' courses.

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCSN), Czech (CZEC), East European (EEUR), Georgian (GEOR),

General Slavic (SLAV), Polish (POLI), Russian (RUSS), South Slavic (SOSL)

- / -
Gogol

20011
30011
REES
Esther Peters
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

One of the most enigmatic authors in Russian literature, Nikolai Gogol (1809-1852) was hailed in his own lifetime as the leading prose writer of his generation, a brilliant comic writer, and the innovator of the new school of Russian Naturalism/Realism. Since his death, Gogol has been the subject of ever-greater critical controversy. Reading representative works from each period of Gogol's career, including his Petersburg Tales and Dead Souls, we will trace the author's creative development and consider it in relation to his biography and early 19th-century Russian literary and social history. We will work together to identify the characteristic features of Gogol's narrative technique as well as the challenges to interpretation his texts pose. No knowledge of Russian required.

- / -
Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I, II, III.

10100
10200
10300
31000
31100
31200
BCSN
N. Petkovic
Autumn Summer Winter
Language course

Knowledge of a Slavic language and background in linguistics not required. The major objective of the courseis to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

- / -
Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I, II, III.

20100
20200
20300
32000
32100
32200
BCSN
N. Petkovic.
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 10300 or consent of instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition toscheduled class time.

- / -
Reading and Research Course.

29700
BCSN
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

- / -
Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I, II, III.

30100
30200
30300
BCSN
N. Petkovic.
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 20300 or consent of instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

This course is tailored to the needs of the students enrolled, depending on their concentration in the field. It enhances language acquisition with continuous reading and translation of essays, newspaper articles, literary excerpts, letters and other selected writings. Vocabulary building is emphasized by the systematic study of nominal and verbal roots, prefixes and suffixes, and word formation thereafter. Discussion follows each completed reading with a written composition assigned in relation to the topic.

- / -
Elementary Czech I, II, III.

10100
10200
10300
CZEC
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research.

- / -
Second-Year Czech I, II, III.

20100
20200
20300
CZEC
Prerequisites: 
CZEC 10300 or consent of instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.

- / -
Czech New Wave Cinema

26700
CZEC
M. Sternstein
Crosslists: 
CZEC 36701, CMST 24401/34401
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

The insurgent film movement known as the Czech New Wave spawned such directors as the internationally acclaimed Milos Forman (The Fireman’s Ball, Loves of a Blonde), Jiri Menzel (Closely Watched Trains), JanKadar (The Shop on Main Street), and Vera Chytilova (Daisies), and the lesser known but nationally inspirational Evald Schorm, Jarmir Jires, Odlrich Lipsky,and Jan Nemec. The serendipitous life of the Czech New Wave is as much a subject of the course’s inquiry as close technical and semantic research of the films themselves.

- / -
Reading and Research Course

29700
CZEC
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
BA Paper

29900
CZEC
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructorand Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade.

- / -
Elementary Modern Armenian I, II, III

21100
21200
21300
31100
31200
31300
EEUR
H. Haroutunian
Crosslists: 
ARME 10101-10102-10103, LGLN10101-10102-10103
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

This three-quarter sequence utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids to enable students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet, and basic grammatical structures, as well as toachieve a reasonable level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). Considerable amounts of historical/political and social/cultural issues about Armenia are built intothis sequence to prepare students who intend to conduct research in Armenian studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

- / -
Introduction to the Musical Folklore of Central Asia

23400
EEUR
K.Arik
Crosslists: 
NEHC20765, ANTH 25905, EEUR 33400, MUSIC 23503/33503
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

This course explores the musical traditions of the peoples of Central Asia, both in terms of historical development and cultural significance. Topics include the music of the epic tradition,the use of music for healing, instrumental genres, and Central Asian folk and classical traditions. Basic field methods for ethnomusicology are also covered. Extensive use is made of recordings of musical performances and of live performances in the area.

- / -
Philosophy of Architecture

29300
EEUR
M. Sternstein
Crosslists: 
EEUR 39300, ISHU 29302
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

Readings are culled from Central and East European and Russian theoretical writings on architectur eand discussed in both an architecturally specific and broader interdisciplinary context (i.e., philosophies of technology, utopic space, psychogeographies) in this course. We read and look at primary texts and architectural executions (e.g., Karel Teige’s 1932 manifesto Minimum Dwelling).

- / -
Elementary Georgian

22100
22200
22300
32100
32200
32300
GEOR
Tamra Wysocki-Niimi
Crosslists: 
EEUR 21400-21500-21600/31400-31500-31600, LGLN 22100-22200-22300
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

This course introduces students to Modern Georgian grammar primarily through reading exercises that relate to Georgian historical, social, and literary traditions. Supplemental activities that encourage writing, speaking, and listening skills are also included in this course.

- / -
Advanced Georgian

22700
22800
2290
32700
32800
32900
GEOR
Tamra Wysocki-Niimi
Crosslists: 
EEUR 22100-22200-22300/32100-32200-32300, LGLN 22700-22800-22900
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

This course emphasizes advanced language skills and vocabulary building through independent reading and writing projects as well as class exercises involving media such as newspaper and magazine articles, videoclips, radio programs, movies, and additional sound recordings and online materials.

- / -
Introduction to Slavic Linguistics

20100
30100
SLAV
Y. Gorbachov
Crosslists: 
LING 26400/36400
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

The main goal of this course isto familiarize students with the essential facts of the Slavic linguistic history and with the most characteristic features of the modern Slaviclanguages. In order to understand the development of Proto-Slavic into theexisting Slavic languages and dialects, we focus on a set of basic phenomena. The course is specifically concerned with making students aware of factors that led to the breakup of the Slavic unity and the emergence of the individual languages. Drawing on the historical development, we touch upon such salient typological characteristics of the modern languages such as the rich set of morphophonemic alternations, aspect, free word order, and agreement.

- / -
Old Church Slavonic

22000
32000
SLAV
Y. Gorbachov
Prerequisites: 
Knowledge of another Slavic language or good knowledge of one or two other old Indo-European languages required, SLAV 20100/30100 recommended.
Crosslists: 
LGLN 25100/35100
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

This course introduces the language of the oldest Slavic texts. It begins with a brief historical overview of the relationship of Old Church Slavonic to Common Slavic and the other Slavic languages. This is followed by a short outline of Old Church Slavonic inflectional morphology. The remainder of the course is spent in the reading and grammatical analysis of original texts. Texts in Cyrillic or Cyrillic transcription of the original Glagolitic.

- / -
Reading and Research Course

29700
SLAV
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

- / -
BA Paper

29900
SLAV
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Readingand Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade.

- / -
Elementary Polish I, II, III

10100
10200
10300
POLI
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

- / -
Second-Year Polish I, II, III

20100
20200
20300
POLI
Prerequisites: 
POLI 10300 or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

- / -
Advanced Polish I, II, III

30100
30200
30300
POLI
Prerequisites: 
POLI 20300 or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

Students in this course discuss selected readings (primarily short stories chosen by the instructor) in Polish during the week. The level of work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. All work in Polish.

- / -
Narratives of Assimilation

27000
37000
POLI
B.Shallcross
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

Topic: Narratives of Assimilation. This course offers a survey into the manifold strategies of representing the Jewish community in East Central Europe beginning from the nineteenth century to the Holocaust. Engaging the concept of liminality—of a society at the threshold of radical transformation—it will analyze Jewry facing uncertainties and challenges of the modern era and its radical changes. Students will be acquainted with problems of cultural and linguistic isolation, hybrid identity, assimilation, and cultural transmission through a wide array of genres—novel, short story, epic poem, memoir, painting, illustration, film. The course draws on both Jewish and Polish-Jewish sources; all texts are read in English translation.

- / -
From Poland to Popland: Contemporary Polish Fiction

27100
37100
POLI
B.Shallcross
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

In Poland, the divide between high and low strata of culture was not negotiable until the postwar advance of mass culture and technology, facilitated by the void created by the disappearing Polish folklore and social programs such as a systemic building of a classless society. Therefore, this course’s main focus is on the trajectory of negotiations and mutual impact between these two cultural spheres, which in turn created a new set of cultural references and associations. On the one hand, the course offers an analysis of this complex interaction, through cinematic adaptations, between Polish canonical literature and contemporary cinema; while on the other, it discusses the young generation of Polish writers’ recent engagement of youth culture, consumerism, popnationalism, and the standardized subculture of nouveau-riches. The course discusses main theoretical approaches to the popular culture; all materials are in English.

- / -
Reading and Research Course

29700
POLI
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required tosubmit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

- / -
BA Paper

29900
POLI
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading andResearch Course Form. Open only to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature. This course must be taken for a quality grade.

- / -
Bruno Schulz: An Unfinished Project

38600
POLI
B.Shallcross
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

This course examines the fictional, non-fictional and visual oeuvre of the brilliant Polish-Jewish modernist Bruno Schulz who perished in the Holocaust. This year marks not only the 120th anniversary of his birth but also the 70th anniversary of his death in the same town of Drohobycz on the southeastern border of Poland. These dates bracket his relatively short life and are evocative of his several unfinished authorial projects. During the course, we will focus on Schulz’s concept of creation through his use of aesthetics of trash and a debased form, kabalistic origins of a fragment, temporality and its movements, myths of province and childhood. We will seek critical answers to his artistic predilection of parochial places and conspiratorial perspectives, masochism, as well as the notion of the moment as both auratic and poetic, in sum, for those components of his world which made him an illusive modernist like no other in his time. The course will be supplemented by the construal of Schulz’s legend in contemporary American fiction (Cynthis Ozick, Jonathan Safran Foer, and Nicole Krauss). All readings in English translation.

- / -
First-Year Russian I, II, III

10100
10200
10300
RUSS
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Russian through Pushkin I, II, III

10400
10500
10600
RUSS
Prerequisites: 
Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300.
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin's shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Second-Year Russian I, II, III

20100
20200
20300
RUSS
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year I, II, III

20400
20500
20600
RUSS
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10600
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Third-Year Russian through Culture I, II, III

20702
20802
20902
RUSS
V.Pichugin
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20300 (two years ofRussian) or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story I, II, III

21002
21102
21202
RUSS
Prerequisites: 
Three years of Russian or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Advanced Russian through Media I, II, III

21302
21402
21502
RUSS
V.Pichugin
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 21200 or consent of instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

This course, which is designedfor fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Russian Literature from Classicism to Romanticism

25500
35500
RUSS
L. Steiner
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

This course offers a survey of the main literary movements, schools, and genres during the period from the 1760s to the 1830s. We will explore the main works of Russian new-classical, pre-romantic and romantic authors, including Mikhail Lomonossov, Gavriil Derzhavin, Denis Fonvizin, Nikolai Novikov, Anns Labzina, Nikolai Karamzin, Aleksandr Radischev, Vassilii Pushkin, Denis Davydov, Vassilii Zhukovskii, Alexandr Pushkin, Mikhail Lermontov and Vladimir Odoevskii. Most texts are available in Russian as well as in translation. However, students are encouraged to read all texts in Russian. The prerequisite for the course: two years of the Russian language.

- / -
Realism in Russia

25600
35600
RUSS
W. Nickell
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

From the 1830s to the 1890s, most Russian prose writers and playwrights were either engaged in the European-wide cultural movement known as "realistic school," which set for itself the task of engaging with social processes from the standpoint of political ideologies. The ultimate goal of this course is to distill more precise meanings of "realism," "critical realism," and"naturalism" in nineteenth-century Russian through analysis of worksby Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Aleksandr Ostrovsky, Goncharov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, and Kuprin. Texts in English and the original. Optional Russian-intensive section offered.

- / -
Russian Literature from Modernism to Post-Modernism

25700
35700
RUSS
R Bird
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

Given the importance of the written word in Russian culture, it is no surprise that writers were full-blooded participants in Russia's tumultuous recent history, which has lurched from war to war, and from revolution to revolution. The change of political regimes has only been outpaced by the change of aesthetic regimes, from realism to symbolism, and then from socialist realism to post-modernism. We sample the major writers, texts, and literary doctrines, paying close attention to the way they responded and contributed to historical events. This course counts as the third part of the survey of Russian literature. Texts in English.

- / -
Pale Fire

29600
RUSS
M. Sternstein
Crosslists: 
FNDL 25311
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
Reading and Research Course

29700
RUSS
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

- / -
BA Paper

29900
RUSS
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade.

- / -
The Aesthetics of Socialist Realism

34502
RUSS
R. Bird and C. Kiaer
Crosslists: 
ARTH 44502, CMST 44510
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

Socialist Realism was declared the official mode of Soviet aesthetic culture in 1934. Though it has been dismissed within the totalitarian model as propaganda or kitsch, this seminar will approach it from the perspective of its aesthetics. By this we mean not only its visual or literary styles, but also its sensory or haptic address to its audiences. Our premise is that the aesthetic system of Socialist Realism was not simply derivative or regressive, but developed novel techniques of transmission and communication; marked by a constant theoretical reflection on artistic practice, Socialist Realism redefined the relationship between artistic and other forms of knowledge, such as science. Operating in an economy of art production and consumption diametrically opposed to the Western art market, Socialist Realism challenged the basic assumptions of Western artistic discourse, including the concept of the avant-garde. It might even be said to offer an alternate model of revolutionary cultural practice, involving the chronicling and producing of a non-capitalist form of modernity. The seminar will focus on Soviet visual art, cinema and fiction during the crucial period of the 1930s under Stalin (with readings available in translation), but we welcome students with relevant research interests that extend beyond these parameters. Conducted jointly by professors Robert Bird (Slavic and Cinemaand Media Studies, University of Chicago) and Christina Kiaer, Art History, Northwestern University, course meetings will be divided evenly between the campuses of Northwestern University and the University of Chicago.

- / -
The Brighter Side of the Balkans: Humor and Satire in Balkan Literature

26610
36610
SOSL
A. Ilieva., V. Friedman.
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
Balkan Folklore

26800
36800
SOSL
A. Ilieva
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23301/33301, NEHC 20568/30568
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is an overview of Balkan folklore from ethnographic, anthropological, historical/political, and performative perspectives. We become acquainted with folk tales, lyric and epic songs, music, and dance. The work of Milman Parry and Albert Lord, who developed their theory of oral composition through work among epic singers in the Balkans, help us understand folk tradition as a dynamic process. We also consider the function of different folklore genres in the imagining and maintenance of community and the socialization of the individual. We also experience this living tradition first hand through our visit to the classes and rehearsals of the Chicago-based ensemble "Balkanske igre."

- / -
20thCentury Emigré Southeast European Literature

26900
SOSL
A. Ilieva
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

 

 

- / -
Returning the Gaze: The Balkans and Western Europe

27200
37200
SOSL
A. Ilieva
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23201/33201, NEHC 20885/30885
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

This course investigates the complex relationship between South East European self-representations and the imagined Western "gaze" for whose benefit the nations stage their quest for identity and their aspirations for recognition. We also think about differing models of masculinity, the figure of the gypsy as a metaphor for the national self in relation to the West, and the myths Balkans tell about themselves. We conclude by considering the role that the imperative to belong to Western Europe played in the Yugoslav wars of succession. Some possible texts/films are Ivo Andric, Bosnian Chronicle; Aleko Konstantinov, Baj Ganyo; Emir Kusturica, Underground; and Milcho Manchevski, Before the Rain.

- / -
The Burden of History: A Nation and Its Lost Paradise

27300
37300
SOSL
A. Ilieva
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23401/33401, NEHC 20573/30573
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

This course begins by defining the nation both historically and conceptually, with attention to Romantic nationalism and its flourishing in Southeastern Europe. We then look at the narrative of original wholeness, loss, and redemption through which Balkan countries retell their Ottoman past. With the help of Freud's analysis of masochistic desire and Žižek's theory of the subject as constituted by trauma, we contemplate the national fixation on the trauma of loss and the dynamic between victimhood and sublimity. The figure of the Janissary highlights the significance of the other in the definition of the self. Some possible texts are Petar Njegoš's Mountain Wreath; Ismail Kadare's The Castle; and Anton Donchev's Time of Parting.

- / -
Magic Realist and Fantastic Writings from the Balkans

27400
37400
SOSL
A. Ilieva
Crosslists: 
CMLT 22201/32201
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

In this course, we ask whether there is such a thing as a "Balkan" type of magic realism and think about the differences between the genres of magic realism and the fantastic, while reading some of the most interesting writing to have come out of the Balkans. We also look at the similarities of the works from different countries (e.g., lyricism of expression, eroticism, nostalgia) and argue for and against considering such similarities constitutive of an overall Balkan sensibility.

- / -
Reading and Research Course

29700
SOSL
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

- / -
BA Paper

29900
SOSL
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade.

- / -
Bakhtin and Lotman: from Polyphony to Semiosphere

23501
33501
RUSS
L. Steiner
Prerequisites: 
There are no prerequisites for this course.
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23502/33502
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

This seminar will focus on major works by the Russian philosopher, philologist and literary theorist Mikhail Bakhtin (1895-1975), including his early philosophical work Author and Hero in Aesthetic Activity, his essays on Speech genres and the Bildungsroman, as well as his books Rabelais and His World and Problems of Dostoevsky's Poetics. We will also read contemporary scholarly studies devoted to Bakhtin and his circle (Clark&Holquist, Morson&Emerson, Tihanov etc.) In the last two weeks of the seminar we will turn to Yurii Lotman, examining his works on semiotics of culture as an original approach to literary theory and semiotics as well as a response to Bakhtin. The course is open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students. All texts are in English. Discussion and final papers are in English.

- / -
Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I

10100
31000
BCSN
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn
Language course

Knowledge of a Slavic language and background in linguistics not required. The major objective of the courseis to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

- / -
Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II

10200
31100
BCSN
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
Language course

Knowledge of a Slavic language and background in linguistics not required. The major objective of the courseis to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

- / -
Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III

10300
31200
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
Language course

Knowledge of a Slavic language and background in linguistics not required. The major objective of the courseis to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

- / -
Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I

20100
32000
BCSN
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 10300 or consent of instructor
Autumn
Language course

The first quarter isdevoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition toscheduled class time.

- / -
Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II

20200
32100
BCSN
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 20100 or consent of instructor.
Winter
Language course

The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

- / -
Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III

20300
32200
BCSN
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 20200 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged
Spring
Language course

The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

- / -
Reading and Research Course

29700
BCSN
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

- / -
Elementary Czech I

10100
CZEC
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn
Language course

This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research.

- / -
Elementary Czech II

10200
CZEC
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
Language course

This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research.

- / -
Elementary Czech III

10300
CZEC
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Language course

This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research.

- / -
Second-Year Czech I

20100
CZEC
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
CZEC 10300 or consent of instructor
Autumn
Language course

The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.

- / -
Second-Year Czech II

20200
CZEC
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
Language course

The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.

- / -
Second-Year Czech III

20300
CZEC
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Language course

The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.

- / -
Reading and Research Course

29700
CZEC
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
BA Paper

29900
CZEC
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a qu
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
East European Horror Cinema

29201
39201
EEUR
Malynne Sternstein
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Knowledge of an East European or Central European Slavic language
Crosslists: 
CMST 25521,CMST 35521
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

Eastern Europe has menaced the "enlightened" West for centuries.  It remains to this day a valuable source for negotiating the West’s phantasies. One need only look at the rich and varied story of the vampire through popular culture from the 18th-century revenant to the 21st-century sex symbol and family man to confirm this fascination.  Eastern Europe (and I use this term here to conform to popular discourse) is the West’s necessary construct to enforce the ideation of its own health and weal.  In this course contemporary horror film produced both within and without Eastern Europe—and at times in partnership with the “West”—but all with the East as haunt, landscape, and affect are discussed with the West’s and East’s anxieties (social, political, artistic) in mind.  Films include Eli Roth’s Hostel franchise, Julie Delpy’s The Countess, Timur Bekmambetov’s Night Watch and Day Watch, Pavel Ruminov’s Dead Daughters, Nacho Cerdà’s The Abandoned, György Palfi’s Taxidermia, and the highly controversial A Serbian Film directed by Srđan Spasojević.  Readings range from work on defining the horror genre to philosophies of anxiety to critical interrogations of specific films.  This class contains films with scenes that ought to be disturbing.

Course: TR 12-1:20 pm in Cobb 425
Screening: W 7-9 pm in Cobb 425

- / -
Old Church Slavonic

22000
32000
SLAV
Victor Friedman
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Knowledge of another Slavic language or good knowledge of another one or two old Indo-European languages. SLAV 20100 recommended.
Crosslists: 
LGLN 25100,LGLN 35100
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

This course introduces the language of the oldest Slavic texts. It begins with a brief historical overview of the relationship of Old Church Slavonic to Common Slavic and the other Slavic languages. This is followed by a short outline of Old Church Slavonic inflectional morphology. The remainder of the course is spent in the reading and grammatical analysis of original texts. Texts in Cyrillic or Cyrillic transcription of the original Glagolitic.

- / -
Literatures of the Christian East: Late Antiquity, Byzantium, and Medieval Russia

22302
32302
SLAV
Boris Maslov
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 32302,CLAS 31113,CLCV 21113,CMLT 22302
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

After the fall of Rome in 476 CE, literatures of the Latin West and—predominantly Greek-speaking—Eastern provinces of the Roman empire followed two very different paths. Covering both religious and secular genres, we will survey some of the most interesting texts written in the Christian East in the period from 330 CE (foundation of Constantinople) to the late 17th century (Westernization of Russia). Our focus throughout will be on continuities within particular styles and types of discourse (court entertainment, rhetoric, historiography, hagiography) and their functions within East Christian cultures. Readings will include Digenes Akritas and Song of Igor’s Campaign, as well as texts by Emperor Julian the Apostate, Gregory of Nazianzus, Emphraim the Syrian, Anna Comnena, Psellos, Ivan the Terrible, and Archbishop Avvakum. No prerequisites. All readings in English.

- / -
Prosody and Poetic Form: An Introduction to Comparative Metrics

22303
32303
SLAV
Boris Maslov
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 32303,CLCV 21313,CLAS 31313,CMLT 22303
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

This class offers (i) an overview of major European systems of versification, with particular attention to their historical development, and (ii) an introduction to the theory of meter. In addition to analyzing the formal properties of verse, we will inquire into their relevance for the articulation of poetic genres and, more broadly, the history of literary (and sub-literary) systems. There will be some emphasis on Graeco-Roman quantitative metrics, its afterlife, and the evolution of Germanic and Slavic syllabo-tonic verse. No prerequisites, but a working knowledge of one European language besides English is strongly recommended.

- / -
Central Asian Cinema

24550
SLAV
Robert Bird
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
CMST 10100 Introduction to Film or consent of instructor.
Crosslists: 
CMST 34550,CMST 24550
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

Nowhere has the advent of modernity been more closely entwined with cinema than in Central Asia, a contested entity which for our purposes stretches from Turkey in the West to Kyrgyzstan in the East, though our emphasis will be squarely on Soviet and post-Soviet Central Asia (especially Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan). This course will trace the encounter with cinematic modernity through the analysis of individual films by major directors, including (but not limited to) Shukhrat Abbasov, Melis Ubukeev, Ali Khamraev, Tolomush Okeev, Sergei Paradzhanov, Gulshad Omarova. In addition to situating the films in their cultural and historical situations, close attention will be paid to the sources of Central Asian cinema in cinemas both adjacent and distant; to the ways in which cinema enables a distinct encounter with modernity; and to the cinematic construction of Central Asia as a cultural entity.

- / -
Reading and Research Course

29700
SLAV
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
BA Paper

29900
SLAV
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality gra
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
Elementary Polish I

10100
POLI
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn
Language course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g., communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students’ native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

- / -
Elementary Polish II

10200
POLI
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

- / -
Elementary Polish III

10300
POLI
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

- / -
Second-Year Polish I

20100
POLI
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
POLI 10300 or equivalent.
Autumn
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

- / -
Second-Year Polish II

20200
POLI
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

- / -
Second-Year Polish III

20300
POLI
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

- / -
Advanced Polish I

20500
30100
POLI
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
POLI 20300 or equivalent.
Autumn
Language course

Students in this course discuss selected readings (primarily short stories chosen by the instructor) in Polish during the week. The level of work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. All work in Polish.

- / -
Advanced Polish II

20600
30200
POLI
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
Language course

Students in this course discuss selected readings (primarily short stories chosen by the instructor) in Polish during the week. The level of work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. All work in Polish.

- / -
Advanced Polish III

20700
30300
POLI
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
Language course

Students in this course discuss selected readings (primarily short stories chosen by the instructor) in Polish during the week. The level of work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. All work in Polish.

- / -
Gombrowicz: The Writer as Philosopher

25301
35301
POLI
Bozena Shallcross
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
ISHU 29405,FNDL 26903
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

In this course, we dwell on Witold Gombrowicz the philosopher, exploring the components of his authorial style and concepts that substantiate his claim to both the literary and the philosophical spheres. Entangled in an ongoing battle with basic philosophical tenets and, indeed, with existence itself, this erudite Polish author is a prime example of a 20th century modernist whose philosophical novels explode with uncanny laughter. In contrast to many of his contemporaries, who established their reputations as writers/philosophers, Gombrowicz applied distinctly literary models to the same questions that they explored. We investigate these models in depth, as we focus on Gombrowicz’s novels, philosophical lectures, and some of his autobiographical writings. With an insight from recent criticism of these primary texts, we seek answers to the more general question: What makes this author a philosopher?

- / -
Kieslowski's French Cinema

25303
35303
POLI
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 25312
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

Krzysztof Kieślowski’s long-lived obsession with parallel histories and repeated chances is best illustrated by his The Double Life of Veronique. The possibility of free choice resulting in being granted a second chance conjoins this film with his French triptych White, Blue, Red, all co-written by Krzysztof Piesiewicz. In this course we discuss why and how in the Kieślowski/Piesiewicz virtual universe the possibility of reconstituting one’s identity, triggered by tragic loss and betrayal, reveals an ever-ambiguous reality. We also analyze how these concepts, posited with visually and aurally dazzling artistry, shift the popular image of Kieślowski as auteur to his viewers’ as co-creators. We read selections from current criticism on the “Three Color Trilogy.” All materials in English.

- / -
Reading and Research Course

29700
POLI
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
BA Paper

29900
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Open only to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature. Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a q
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
First-Year Russian I

10100
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

- / -
First-Year Russian II

10200
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

- / -
First-Year Russian III

10300
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

- / -
Russian through Pushkin I

10400
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin’s shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Russian through Pushkin II

10500
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin’s shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Russian through Pushkin III

10600
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin’s shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Second-Year Russian I

20100
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor
Autumn
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Second-Year Russian II

20200
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor
Winter
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Second-Year Russian III

20300
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year I

20400
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10600
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year II

20500
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year III

20600
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Third-Year Russian through Culture I

20702
RUSS
Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20300 (two years of Russian) or equivalent
Autumn
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Third-Year Russian through Culture II

20802
RUSS
Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Third-Year Russian through Culture III

20902
RUSS
Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story I

21002
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Three years of Russian or equivalent
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story II

21102
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story III

21202
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Advanced Russian through Media I

21302
30102
RUSS
Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 21002 or consent of instructor
Autumn
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Advanced Russian through Media II

21402
30202
RUSS
Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Advanced Russian through Media III

21502
30302
RUSS
Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Russian for Heritage Learners

21600
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Ability to speak Russian fluently required; formal training in Russian not required
Autumn
Language course

This course examines the major aspects of Russian grammar and stylistics essential for heritage learners. Students engage in close readings and discussions of short stories by classic and contemporary Russian authors (e.g., Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Platonov, Bulgakov, Erofeev, Tolstaya), with special emphasis on their linguistic and stylistic differences. All work in Russian.

NO LONGER OFFERED

- / -
Lolita

23900
RUSS
Malynne Sternstein
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 25300, ENGL 28916
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

“Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul, Lolita: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate, to tap at three on the teeth.” Popular as Nabokov’s “all-American” novel is, it is rarely discussed beyond its psychosexual profile. This intensive text-centered and discussion-based course attempts to supersede the univocal obsession with the novel’s pedophiliac plot as such by concerning itself above all with the novel’s language: language as failure, as mania, and as conjuration.

- / -
Pushkin and His Age

24101
34101
RUSS
Lina Steiner
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

This course approaches the Golden Age of Russian culture through the prism of the artistic and intellectual legacy of its most influential writer. We read and analyze Pushkin’s poetry, prose fiction, essays, and critical works in the context of the critical, philosophical, and political debates of his time. We also consider writers such as Rousseau, Montesquieu, Karamzin, Balzac, Chaadaev, and Belinsky. Texts in English or the original; classes conducted in English.

- / -
Introduction to Russian Civilization I

25100
RUSS
F. Hillis, M. Merritt
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not offered in 2014-15.
Crosslists: 
HIST 13900,SOSC 24000
Autumn

This two-quarter sequence provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Russian civilization. The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1880s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include: the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual, and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence is offered in alternate years.

- / -
Introduction to Russian Civilization II

25200
RUSS
R. Bird, W. Nickell
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not offered 2014-15.
Crosslists: 
HIST 14000,SOSC 24100
Winter

This two-quarter sequence provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Russian civilization. The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1880s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include: the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual, and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence is offered in alternate years.

- / -
Russian Literature from Classicism to Romanticism

25500
35500
RUSS
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Two years of Russian language
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

This course offers a survey of the main literary movements, schools, and genres during the period from the 1760s to the 1830s. We will explore the main works of Russian new-classical, pre-romantic, and romantic authors, including Mikhail Lomonossov, Gavriil Derzhavin, Denis Fonvizin, Nikolai Novikov, Anns Labzina, Nikolai Karamzin, Aleksandr Radischev, Vassilii Pushkin, Denis Davydov, Vassilii Zhukovskii, Alexandr Pushkin, Mikhail Lermontov, and Vladimir Odoevskii. Most texts are available in Russian as well as in translation. However, students are encouraged to read all texts in Russian.

- / -
Realism in Russia

25600
35600
RUSS
Lina Steiner
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

From the 1830s to the 1890s, most Russian prose writers and playwrights were either engaged in the European-wide cultural movement known as "realistic school" which set for itself the task of engaging with social processes from the standpoint of political ideologies. The ultimate goal of this course is to distill more precise meanings of "realism," "critical realism,"and "naturalism" in nineteenth-century Russian through analysis of works by Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Aleksandr Ostrovsky, Goncharov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, and Kuprin. Texts in English and the original. Optional Russian-intensive section offered.

- / -
Russian Literature from Modernism to Post-Modernism

25700
35700
RUSS
William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

Given the importance of the written word in Russian culture, it is no surprise that writers were full-blooded participants in Russia's tumultuous recent history, which has lurched from war to war, and from revolution to revolution. The change of political regimes has only been outpaced by the change of aesthetic regimes, from realism to symbolism, and then from socialist realism to post-modernism. We sample the major writers, texts, and literary doctrines, paying close attention to the way they responded and contributed to historical events. This course counts as the third part of the survey of Russian literature. Texts in English.

- / -
Solzhenitsyn

26105
RUSS
Robert Bird
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 26105
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

Nobel Laureate in Literature in 1970, Alexander Solzhenitsyn (1918–2008) is best known as an advocate for human rights in the Soviet Union, from which he was expelled in 1974. As with Tolstoy a century before, Solzhenitsyn’s vast moral authority rested upon the reputation he gained as a novelist in the early 1960s. We will read his novels One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich and Cancer Ward as innovative and complex fictions in the tradition of the Russian novel. We will then read the first volume of his monumental Archipelago GULAG, which he called “an experiment in literary investigation,” to see how he brought his artistic talents to bear on the hidden and traumatic history of repression under Stalin. At the center of the course will be the tensions in Solzhenitsyn’s work between fiction and history, individual and society, modernity and tradition, humanism and ideology.

- / -
Soviet Everyday Life

26205
36205
RUSS
William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
Jewish Writers in Russian Literature

26206
36206
RUSS
William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
Reading and Research Course

29700
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
BA Paper

29900
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a qua
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
Russian Poetry from Blok to Pasternak

34504
RUSS
R. Bird, B. Maslov
Course level: 
Graduate
Prerequisites: 
Knowledge of Russian required.
Crosslists: 
CMLT 34504
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

We will survey the selected poetry of major Russian modernists from 1900 to 1935, including lyrical and narrative genres. Poets covered include: Aleksandr Blok, Andrei Belyi, Viacheslav Ivanov, Nikolai Gumilev, Osip Mandel’shtam, Anna Akhmatova, Velimir Khlebnikov, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Marina Tsvetaeva, Boris Pasternak. In addition to tracing the development of poetic doctrines (from symbolism through acmeism and futurism), we will investigate the close correlations between formal innovation and the changing semantics of Russian poetry. Attention will also be paid to contemporary developments in Western European poetry. Knowledge of Russian required.

- / -
Faith, Doubt and Secularization in 19th-Century Russia

34802
RUSS
Lina Steiner
Course level: 
Graduate
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
The Brighter Side of the Balkans

26610
36610
SOSL
V. Friedman, A. Ilieva
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
NEHC 20884,NEHC 30884
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

Laughter is universal but its causes are culturally determined. A joke in one culture can be a shaggy dog story in another.  The figure of the trickster occurs in many places and times and under many guises. Stereotypes can be revelatory about those who deploy them. At the same time, humor can be both an outlet and a danger. There is a special word in Russian for those sentenced to prison for telling political jokes.  This course focuses on Balkan humor, which, like the Balkans itself, is located in a space where "Western Europe", "Eastern Europe" "Central Europe" "The Mediterranean", "The Levant", and the "Near/Middle East" intersect in various ways (linguistically and culturally), compete for dominance or resist domination, and ultimately create a unique--albeit fuzzily bounded--subject of study.

In this course, we examine the poetics of laughter in the Balkans. In order to do so, we introduce humor as both cultural and transnational. We unpack the multiple layers of cultural meaning in the logic of “Balkan humor.” We also examine the functions and mechanisms of laughter, both in terms of cultural specificity and general practice and theories of humor. Thus, the study of Balkan humor will help us elucidate the “Balkan” and the “World,” and will provide insight not only into cultural mores and social relations, but into the very notion of “funny.” Our own laughter in class will be the best measure of our success – both cultural and intellectual.

- / -
Balkan Folklore

26800
36800
SOSL
Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23301,CMLT 33301,NEHC 20568,NEHC 30568,
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is an overview of Balkan folklore from ethnographic, anthropological, historical/political, and performative perspectives. We become acquainted with folk tales, lyric and epic songs, music, and dance. The work of Milman Parry and Albert Lord, who developed their theory of oral composition through work among epic singers in the Balkans, helps us understand folk tradition as a dynamic process. We also consider the function of different folklore genres in the imagining and maintenance of community and the socialization of the individual. We also experience this living tradition first hand through our visit to the classes and rehearsals of the Chicago-based ensemble "Balkanske igre."

- / -
Returning the Gaze: The Balkans and Western Europe

27200
37200
SOSL
Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23201,CMLT 33201,NEHC 20885,NEHC 30885
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

The Other Within the Self: Identity in Balkan Literature and Film. This two-course sequence examines discursive practices in a number of literary and cinematic works from the South East corner of Europe through which identities in the region become defined by two distinct others: the “barbaric, demonic” Ottoman and the “civilized” Western European.

This course investigates the complex relationship between South East European self-representations and the imagined Western "gaze" for whose benefit the nations stage their quest for identity and their aspirations for recognition. We also think about differing models of masculinity, the figure of the gypsy as a metaphor for the national self in relation to the West, and the myths Balkans tell about themselves. We conclude by considering the role that the imperative to belong to Western Europe played in the Yugoslav wars of succession. Some possible texts/films are Ivo Andric, Bosnian Chronicle; Aleko Konstantinov, Baj Ganyo; Emir Kusturica, Underground; and Milcho Manchevski, Before the Rain.

- / -
The Burden of History: A Nation and Its Lost Paradise

27300
37300
SOSL
Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23401,CMLT 33401,NEHC 20573,NEHC 30573,
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

The Other Within the Self: Identity in Balkan Literature and Film. This two-course sequence examines discursive practices in a number of literary and cinematic works from the South East corner of Europe through which identities in the region become defined by two distinct others: the “barbaric, demonic” Ottoman and the “civilized” Western European.

This course begins by defining the nation both historically and conceptually, with attention to Romantic nationalism and its flourishing in Southeastern Europe. We then look at the narrative of original wholeness, loss, and redemption through which Balkan countries retell their Ottoman past. With the help of Freud's analysis of masochistic desire and Žižek's theory of the subject as constituted by trauma, we contemplate the national fixation on the trauma of loss and the dynamic between victimhood and sublimity. The figure of the Janissary highlights the significance of the other in the definition of the self. Some possible texts are Petar Njegoš's Mountain Wreath; Ismail Kadare's The Castle; and Anton Donchev's Time of Parting.

- / -
Reading and Research Course

29700
SOSL
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
BA Paper

29900
SOSL
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a qua
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
The Progress of History in Film: Modes of Historical Realism in Soviet Cinema

24409
RUSS
Zdenko Mandusic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
NOTE: Course will be taught TR 3-4:20; film screenings on F 3-6:00 (updated 11/14/13)
Crosslists: 
CMST 24520
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

How did Soviets see themselves in history? How was Soviet progress through history visually represented? Did modes of representing history in film change over time? This course will interrogate the tensions between different styles of visual and narrative representation of history and how these tensions arise from the methods and ideological implications of representing historical reality in Soviet cinema. The corpus of films for this course aims to represent a diachronic survey of Soviet cinema and its treatment of history and realism. Screenings will be supplemented with primary and secondary literature covering the first two thirds of Russian history of the twentieth century. The selected films and readings are organized to investigate how films structure the perception of history and reality in the context of the Soviet Union. We want to ask what are the aesthetic and political implications of films made between the mid-1920s and the early 1970s? How did these films represent the revolutionary history and the revolutionary present? How were they shaped by political circumstances? What is the connection between aesthetic transitions and social and political changes in Soviet culture?

We will begin with films made in the aftermath of the October Revolution, investigating how political demands and practical necessities combined to shape drastic developments in film style and the treatment of history and reality. After the revolutionary Avant-Garde films of the 1920s, we shall scrutinize the impact of Stalinism on Soviet film style. The trajectory of the course will then lead us to conclude with films of the Thaw, the period of cultural and political liberalization that followed the death of Stalin. As we move through these periods of Soviet history, we will consider how political limits, stylistic conditions, and industry developments shaped the content and form of Soviet cinema from the October Revolution to the Post-Stalinist period. As we investigate these cultural and political contexts, we also want to delineate the connections between different definitions of what Soviet cinema was supposed to be. This investigation will be based on theories regarding the film medium and will involve considering how different filmmakers emphasized particular properties of the medium. 

- / -
The Places of Memory, 1780-1880

25007
RUSS
Monica Felix
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
No prerequisites. All readings in English with optional reading groups to discuss German and Russian works in the original for all interested students.
Crosslists: 
CMLT 25007, GRMN 25014
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

This course will investigate the affinities between place and memory in literature. In considering works that span a century of literature, we will reflect on memory as a force that emerges as an expression of self – or nation – that is tethered to objects, places, or structures. Course readings will be drawn primarily from German, Russian, and Anglophone literatures (Eichendorff, Tieck, Hoffmann, Fet, Tiutchev, Pushkin, Elliot, Scott, Brontë, others). Supplementary readings drawn from literary criticism, philosophy, historiography, and complementary fields will help us to consider the intersection of literature and history as it relates to questions of a historically constructed subject or nation. Topics include collaborative memory, romanticism, intertextuality, historical representation, historical fiction, and nostalgia.

- / -
The Second World War Revisited—A Jewish Perspective

56101
SLAV
Dan Diner
Course level: 
Graduate
Crosslists: 
HIST 56101
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

The course will approach World War II with a specific "Jewish Question," so to speak. What historical, strategic, and military factors caused the fates of the Jews of Europe and the Mandatory Palestine to differ? In order to understand this and similar questions, a new view of the war and its prehistory is required. This course will consider French and British intentions in and reactions to developments in East Asia, South Asia, and the Middle East since 1919, and the entanglement of these developments with those on the European continent. The course will focus on imperial, continental, colonial, and Jewish history, and how these relate to the question of inquiry.

- / -
Jews of Central & East-Central Europe during the Interwar Period

23509
33509
SLAV
Dan Diner
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
HIST 23509/33509
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

The course intends to lay the foundations for understanding the historical constellation of the Jews in Central and East-Central Europe in the inter-war period, 1919-1939. First, we consider the structural transformation from empires into nation-states as the backdrop of World War I and its aftershocks, especially the pogroms and anti-Jewish violence that accompanied the rise of ethnic nationalism in newly established nations-states. Next, we concentrate on the year 1919 and the Paris Peace Conference, with the minority-treaties as the "Jewish" theme. Finally, we focus on the dissolution of the political order, using the framework of the League of Nations and its repercussions on Jewish life in the region. The course focus will be to gain knowledge and historical awareness concerning Central and East-Central Jewish life; the course will also consider questions of methodology and theory of Jewish history in the modern age.

- / -
Intensive Introductory Russian

10003
10006
RUSS
Staff
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Summer
Language course

The RUSS 10003-10006 course sequence provides a comprehensive introduction to modern standard Russian. Students will achieve novice high to intermediate low proficiency in speaking, reading, writing, and listening and will be introduced to Russian culture and history through authentic texts, audio and video, Internet and multimedia activities, and film screenings. The course provides 140 contact hours over a 6-week period, divided into two segments of three weeks each. The RUSS 10003-10006 sequence is the equivalent of the 10100-10200-10300 sequence offered during the regular academic year at the University of Chicago.

For more information and to register, please visit the Summer Language Institute website.

- / -
Intensive Intermediate Russian

20003
20006
RUSS
Cori Anderson
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Summer
Language course

The RUSS 20003-20006 course sequence enables students to develop solid intermediate speaking, listening, reading and writing skills and further solidify their foundation in grammar and vocabulary. Students will explore Russian culture through authentic texts, audio and video, multimedia and Internet activities, and film screenings. The course provides 140 contact hours over a 6-week period, divided into two segments of three weeks each and may be FLAS eligible, depending on the student’s home institution. The RUSS 20003-20006 sequence is the equivalent of the 20100-20200-20300 sequence offered during the regular academic year at the University of Chicago.

For more information and to register, please visit the Summer Language Institute website.

- / -
Introduction to Interpretation (Russian-English, English-Russian)

21700
RUSS
Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Summer
Language course

This course introduces students to the field of conference interpretation in general and to consecutive interpretation in particular. It emphasizes the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (Russian/English) and convey it in the target language (English/Russian) in a straightforward and clear manner. The course develops a student’s ability to analyze and paraphrase the meaning of a passage in the source language, and to identify the passage’s components and establish a logical relationship among them. Students will focus on active listening and concentration skills, memory enhancing techniques, and the ability to abstract information for subsequent recall. Basic elements of note-taking will be discussed as well. At the end of the course students will be able to interpret 3-5 minute extemporaneous passages on familiar topics. During practice sessions students will listen to and repeat the content of passages of increasing length and difficulty. Top
ics wil
l cover daily life, current events and the media, as well as general areas of students’ interest. PQ: Fluency in English and Russian. Students with no prior experience in interpreting will work from their “weaker” language into their stronger; students with more practice (advanced and immersion courses, time living in Russia, raised in Russian speaking households, etc.) will practice both ways.

For more information and to register, please visit the Summer Language Institute website.

- / -
Intermediate Interpretation: Consecutive and Simultaneous (Russian-English, English-Russian)

21701
RUSS
Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Summer
Language course

This course develops skills and techniques acquired in Introduction to Interpretation. In consecutive interpretation, the following will be emphasized: clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction and presentation, and strategies for dealing with cultural and linguistic problems. Students will expand their active vocabulary to include terms and idioms frequent in extemporaneous speeches. At the end of the course students will be able to interpret extemporaneous passages of moderate difficulty derived from professional settings (sources will vary).
Basic strategies for simultaneous interpretation will be introduced, and exercises will be provided to help develop the concentration necessary for listening and speaking at the same time. The students will work to master voice management, and to acquire smooth delivery techniques. Students will learn to analyze discourse for meaning while rendering a coherent interpretation in the target language with correct grammar, diction and style. At the end of the course, students will be able to interpret 8-10 minute passages from public lectures, radio addresses, interviews, news reports, etc. PQ: Introduction to Interpretation, or equivalent; consent of the instructor. Recommended to students past 3rd year and/or heritage/ native speakers of Russian.

For more information and to register, please visit the Summer Language Institute website.

- / -
Intensive Introductory Georgian

20003
20006
GEOR
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Summer
Language course

This six-week course provides a comprehensive introduction to modern Georgian. Class time will emphasize basic communicative skills (reading, writing, listening comprehension, and speaking). Students will also become familiar with Georgian history and culture by working with authentic texts, audio and video, multimedia activities, and film screenings. After completing the course sequence, students will straddle the novice and intermediate proficiency levels in speaking, reading, writing, and listening. The University of Chicago is the only university in the U.S. to offer Georgian regularly. The course provides 140 contact hours over a 6-week period, divided into two segments of three weeks each. The GEOR 10003-10006 sequence is the equivalent of the 10100-10200-10300 sequence offered during the regular academic year at the University of Chicago. Intensive Introductory Georgian is FLAS eligible.

For more information and to register, please visit the Summer Language Institute website.

- / -
The Transnational Subject: Jewish Writers and Russian Lit

26207
36207
RUSS
William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

Considers the experience of Jewish national subjectivity under conditions of Russian and Soviet empire in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. While attentive to practices of physical marginalization and assimilation (the Pale of Settlement, Birobidzhan), we will focus mainly on the literary record in works by Dostoevsky, Solovyov, Kovner, Babel, An-sky, Bagritsky, Grossman, Ehrenburg, and Brodsky. The syllabus also includes works in theatre, painting and film, as well as important critical texts on subjectivity and post-colonial theory.

- / -
Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I

10100
31000
BCSN
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Knowledge of a Slavic language and background in linguistics not required.
Autumn
Language course

The major objective of the courseis to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

- / -
Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II

10200
31100
BCSN
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 10100 or consent of instructor.
Winter
Language course

The major objective of the courseis to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

- / -
Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III

10300
31200
BCSN
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 10200 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Spring
Language course

The major objective of the courseis to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

- / -
Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I

20100
32000
BCSN
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 10300 or consent of instructor
Autumn
Language course

The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition toscheduled class time.

- / -
Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II

20200
32100
BCSN
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 20100 or consent of instructor.
Winter
Language course

The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

- / -
Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III

20300
32200
BCSN
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 20200 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged
Spring
Language course

The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

- / -
Reading and Research Course

29700
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

- / -
Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I

30100
BCSN
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 20300 or consent of instructor.
Autumn
Language course

This course is tailored to the needs of the students enrolled, depending on their concentration in the field. It enhances language acquisition with continuous reading and translation of essays, newspaper articles, literary excerpts, letters and other selected writings. Vocabulary building is emphasized by the systematic study of nominal and verbal roots, prefixes and suffixes, and word formation thereafter. Discussion follows each completed reading with a written composition assigned in relation to the topic.

- / -
Elementary Czech I

10100
CZEC
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
Language course

This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research

- / -
Elementary Czech II

10200
CZEC
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
CZEC 10100 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Winter
Language course

This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research.

- / -
Elementary Czech III

10300
CZEC
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
CZEC 10200 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Spring
Language course

This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research.

- / -
Second-Year Czech I

20100
CZEC
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
CZEC 10300 or consent of instructor
Autumn
Language course

The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.

- / -
Second-Year Czech II

20200
CZEC
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
CZEC 20100 or consent of instructor.
Winter
Language course

The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.

- / -
Second-Year Czech III

20300
CZEC
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
CZEC 20200 or consent of instructor.
Spring
Language course

The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.

- / -
Reading and Research Course

29700
CZEC
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
BA Paper

29900
CZEC
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of Instructor and Dept. Advisor; College Reading & research form required; Enter section from faculty list
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
Elementary Polish I

10100
POLI
Erik Houle
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
Language course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g., communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students’ native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

- / -
Elementary Polish II

10200
POLI
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
POLI 10100 or consent of instructor
Winter
Language course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

- / -
Elementary Polish III

10300
POLI
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
POLI 10200 or consent of instructor
Spring
Language course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

- / -
Second-Year Polish I

20100
POLI
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
POLI 10300 or equivalent
Autumn
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

- / -
Second-Year Polish II

20200
POLI
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

- / -
Second-Year Polish III

20300
POLI
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

- / -
Advanced Polish I

20500
30100
POLI
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
POLI 20300 or equivalent
Autumn
Language course

Students in this course discuss selected readings (primarily short stories chosen by the instructor) in Polish during the week. The level of work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. All work in Polish.

- / -
Advanced Polish II

20600
30200
POLI
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
Language course

Students in this course discuss selected readings (primarily short stories chosen by the instructor) in Polish during the week. The level of work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. All work in Polish.

- / -
Advanced Polish III

20700
30300
POLI
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
Language course

Students in this course discuss selected readings (primarily short stories chosen by the instructor) in Polish during the week. The level of work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. All work in Polish.

- / -
First-Year Russian I

10100
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

- / -
First-Year Russian II

10200
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

- / -
First-Year Russian III

10300
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

- / -
Second-Year Russian I

20100
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor
Autumn
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Second-Year Russian II

20200
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Second-Year Russian III

20300
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year II

20500
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year III

20600
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Third-Year Russian through Culture I

20702
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20300 (two years of Russian) or equivalent
Autumn
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Third-Year Russian through Culture II

20802
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Third-Year Russian through Culture III

20902
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story I

21002
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Three years of Russian or equivalent
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story II

21102
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story III

21202
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Advanced Russian through Media I

21302
30102
RUSS
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 21002 or consent of instructor
Autumn
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Advanced Russian through Media II

21402
30202
RUSS
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Advanced Russian through Media III

21502
30202
RUSS
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

- / -
Realism in Russia

25600
35600
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

From the 1830s to the 1890s, most Russian prose writers and playwrights were either engaged in the European-wide cultural movement known as "realistic school" which set for itself the task of engaging with social processes from the standpoint of political ideologies. The ultimate goal of this course is to distill more precise meanings of "realism," "critical realism,"and "naturalism" in nineteenth-century Russian through analysis of works by Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Aleksandr Ostrovsky, Goncharov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, and Kuprin. Texts in English and the original. Optional Russian-intensive section offered.

- / -
Russian Literature from Modernism to Post-Modernism

25700
35700
RUSS
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

Given the importance of the written word in Russian culture, it is no surprise that writers were full-blooded participants in Russia's tumultuous recent history, which has lurched from war to war, and from revolution to revolution. The change of political regimes has only been outpaced by the change of aesthetic regimes, from realism to symbolism, and then from socialist realism to post-modernism. We sample the major writers, texts, and literary doctrines, paying close attention to the way they responded and contributed to historical events. This course counts as the third part of the survey of Russian literature. Texts in English.

- / -
Elementary Georgian-1

22100
32100
GEOR
T. Wysocki-Niimi
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
EEUR 21400,EEUR 31400,LGLN 22100,LGLN 32100
Autumn
Language course

This is a three-quarter course that covers basic Modern Georgian grammar and includes writing, reading, listening, and speaking activities. We'll be referring to Howard Aronson's textbook (Georgian: A Reading Grammar) and supplementing with additional authentic texts, audio, and video materials that will be provided in class. The University of Chicago is the only university in the U.S. to regularly offer Georgian! Take advantage of this rare opportunity to study a unique and fascinating language!

- / -
Intermediate Georgian-1

22400
32400
GEOR
T. Wysocki-Niimi
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LGLN 22400,LGLN 32400
Autumn
Language course

This three-quarter course builds speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills based on the knowledge developed during Elementary Georgian. In addition, more complicated grammatical topics are discussed and practiced through a variety of activities and exercises that integrate multimedia materials with traditional translation work.

- / -
Advanced Georgian-1

22700
32700
GEOR
T. Wysocki-Niimi
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LGLN 22700, LGLN 32700
Autumn
Language course

This three-quarter course emphasizes advanced language skills and vocabulary building through independent reading and writing projects as well as class exercises involving media such as newspaper and magazine articles, video clips, radio programs, movies, and additional authentic recordings and online materials.

- / -
Introduction to Georgian History and Culture

21700
31700
GEOR
T. Wysocki-Niimi
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
HIST 24004
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

This one-quarter course will provide students with a rare opportunity to learn more about the history of the Republic of Georgia and its culture through a selection of literature and poetry (in translation), films, lectures, and class discussions and activities. We will survey Georgian history from its prehistory through its Golden Age in the 12th century up to the present day. Discussions relating to Georgian culture will include music, art (including metalwork and cloisonné), traditional dance, religious and pagan practices, and Georgia’s wine and toasting culture. Throughout the course we will consider issues of Georgian identity and nationhood, especially in relation to influences from surrounding regions.

- / -
Elementary Georgian-2

22200
32200
GEOR
T. Wysocki-Niimi
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LGLN 22200,LGLN 32200
Winter
Language course

This course introduces students to Modern Georgian grammar primarily through reading exercises that relate to Georgian historical, social, and literary traditions. Supplemental activities that encourage writing, speaking, and listening skills are also included in this course.

- / -
Intermediate Georgian-2

22500
32500
GEOR
T. Wysocki-Niimi
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LGLN 22500,LGLN 32500
Winter
Language course

This course emphasizes advanced language skills and vocabulary building through independent reading and writing projects as well as class exercises involving media such as newspaper and magazine articles, videoclips, radio programs, movies, and additional sound recordings and online materials.

- / -
Advanced Georgian-2

22800
32800
GEOR
T. Wysocki-Niimi
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LGLN 22800, LGLN 32800
Winter
Language course

This three-quarter course emphasizes advanced language skills and vocabulary building through independent reading and writing projects as well as class exercises involving media such as newspaper and magazine articles, video clips, radio programs, movies, and additional authentic recordings and online materials.

- / -
Elementary Georgian-3

22300
32300
GEOR
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
EEUR 21600,EEUR 31600,LGLN 22300,LGLN 32300
Spring
Language course

- / -
Intermediate Georgian-3

22600
32600
GEOR
T. Wysocki-Niimi
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LGLN 22600,LGLN 32600
Spring
Language course

- / -
Advanced Georgian-3

22900
32900
T. Wysocki-Niimi
Crosslists: 
LGLN 22900, LGLN 32900
Spring
Language course

- / -
Returning the Gaze: The Balkans and Western Europe

27200
37200
SOSL
A. Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23201,CMLT 33201,NEHC 20885,NEHC 30885
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

The Other Within the Self: Identity in Balkan Literature and Film. This two-course sequence examines discursive practices in a number of literary and cinematic works from the South East corner of Europe through which identities in the region become defined by two distinct others: the “barbaric, demonic” Ottoman and the “civilized” Western European.

This course investigates the complex relationship between South East European self-representations and the imagined Western "gaze" for whose benefit the nations stage their quest for identity and their aspirations for recognition. We also think about differing models of masculinity, the figure of the gypsy as a metaphor for the national self in relation to the West, and the myths Balkans tell about themselves. We conclude by considering the role that the imperative to belong to Western Europe played in the Yugoslav wars of succession. Some possible texts/films are Ivo Andric, Bosnian Chronicle; Aleko Konstantinov, Baj Ganyo; Emir Kusturica, Underground; and Milcho Manchevski, Before the Rain.

- / -
Gender in the Balkans: Sworn Virgins, Wounded Men & Eternal Mothers

27601
37601
SOSL
A. Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23902,CMLT 33902, GNSE 27607
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

Through some of the best literary and cinematic works from Southeastern Europe, we will consider the questions of socialization into gendered modes of being – the demands, comforts, pleasures and frustrations that individuals experience while trying to embody and negotiate social categories. We will examine how masculinity and femininity are constituted in the traditional family model, the socialist paradigm, and during post-socialist transitions. We will also contemplate how gender categories are experienced through other forms of identity–the national and socialist especially–as well as how gender is used to symbolize and animate these other identities. The course assumes no prior knowledge of the history of Southeastern Europe, literature or gender theory. All readings in English translation.

- / -
Balkan Folklore

26800
36800
SOSL
A. Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
NEHC 20568,NEHC 30568,CMLT 23301,CMLT 33301,ANTH 25908,ANTH 35908
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

Immerse yourself in the magic world of vampires and dragons, bagpipes and uneven beats, quick-step circle dance. This course give an introduction to Balkan folklore from anthropological, historical/political, and performative perspectives. We become acquainted with folk tales, lyric and epic songs, music, and dance. The work of Milman Parry and Albert Lord, who developed their theory of oral composition through work among epic singers in the Balkans, helps us understand folk tradition as a dynamic process – how is oral tradition transmitted, preserved, changed, forgotten? how do illiterate singers learn their long narrative poems, how do musicians learn to play? We consider the function of different folklore genres in the imagining and maintenance of community and the socialization of the individual. The historical/political part will survey the emergence of folklore studies as a discipline as well as the ways it has served in the formation and propagation of the nation in the Balkans. The class will also experience this living tradition first hand through our in-class workshop with the Chicago based dance ensemble “Balkanski igri.” The Annual Balkan Folklore Spring Festival will be held in March at the International House.

- / -
The Burden of History: The Nation and Its Lost Paradise

27300
37300
SOSL
A. Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23401,CMLT 33401,NEHC 20573,NEHC 30573,HIST 24005,HIST 34005
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

The Other Within the Self: Identity in Balkan Literature and Film. This two-course sequence examines discursive practices in a number of literary and cinematic works from the South East corner of Europe through which identities in the region become defined by two distinct others: the “barbaric, demonic” Ottoman and the “civilized” Western European.

This course begins by defining the nation both historically and conceptually, with attention to Romantic nationalism and its flourishing in Southeastern Europe. We then look at the narrative of original wholeness, loss, and redemption through which Balkan countries retell their Ottoman past. With the help of Freud's analysis of masochistic desire and Žižek's theory of the subject as constituted by trauma, we contemplate the national fixation on the trauma of loss and the dynamic between victimhood and sublimity. The figure of the Janissary highlights the significance of the other in the definition of the self. Some possible texts are Petar Njegoš's Mountain Wreath; Ismail Kadare's The Castle; and Anton Donchev's Time of Parting.

- / -
The Brighter Side of the Balkans: Humor & Satire in Lit & Film

26610
36610
SOSL
V. Friedman, A. Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
NEHC 20884,NEHC 30884, CMLT 26610
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

Laughter is universal but its causes are culturally determined. A joke in one culture can be a shaggy dog story in another.  The figure of the trickster occurs in many places and times and under many guises. Stereotypes can be revelatory about those who deploy them. At the same time, humor can be both an outlet and a danger. There is a special word in Russian for those sentenced to prison for telling political jokes.  This course focuses on Balkan humor, which, like the Balkans itself, is located in a space where "Western Europe", "Eastern Europe" "Central Europe" "The Mediterranean", "The Levant", and the "Near/Middle East" intersect in various ways (linguistically and culturally), compete for dominance or resist domination, and ultimately create a unique--albeit fuzzily bounded--subject of study.

In this course, we examine the poetics of laughter in the Balkans. In order to do so, we introduce humor as both cultural and transnational. We unpack the multiple layers of cultural meaning in the logic of “Balkan humor.” We also examine the functions and mechanisms of laughter, both in terms of cultural specificity and general practice and theories of humor. Thus, the study of Balkan humor will help us elucidate the “Balkan” and the “World,” and will provide insight not only into cultural mores and social relations, but into the very notion of “funny.” Our own laughter in class will be the best measure of our success – both cultural and intellectual.

- / -
Imaginary Worlds: Fantastic & Magic Realism in Russia & Southeastern Europe

27700
37700
SOSL
A. Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Readings in English. Background in Russia and the Balkans will make the course easier, but is not required.
Crosslists: 
CMLT 27701, CMLT 37701, RUSS 27300, RUSS 37300
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

In this course, we will ask what constitutes the fantastic and magic realism as literary genres while reading some of the most interesting writings to have come out of Russia and Southeastern Europe. While considering the stylistic and narrative specificities of this narrative mode, we also think about its political functions —from subversive to escapist, to supportive of a nationalist imaginary—in different contexts and at different historic moments in the two regions.

- / -
The Russian Novel

25502
35502
RUSS
William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 25334
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

The course will focus on three of the greatest philosophical crime novels in modern literature: Gogol’s Dead Souls, Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, and Bely’s Peterburg. Together they chart the course of development of the Russian novel, engaging literature’s essential questions, but also its “accursed” ones, as the Russians say—the ones that can never be answered, but provoke the most worthy of sort of debate.

- / -
Literatures of Russian and African-American Soul

26208
36208
RUSS
William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
ENGL 28917, CMLT 26208, CRES 26208
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

Among the legacies of slavery, serfdom and colonialism is the idea that dominant, Europeanized cultures have lost something essential, which can still be found in the peoples they have oppressed, and is sometimes vaguely designated by the term "soul." We consider this tendency in the Russian and American traditions, reading texts from both sides of the social and economic divide. Material includes Tolstoy, Turgenev, Douglass, Dostoevsky, DuBois, Hurston, Hughes, Platonov, Baldwin, & Solzhenitsyn—and lots of music.

- / -
Structure of Macedonian

21700
31700
SOSL
V. Friedman
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Knowledge of another Slavic or Balkan language
Crosslists: 
LING 24310/34310
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

An introduction to the standard language of the Republic of Macedonia. Macedonian is often described as the most Balkan of the Balkan languages. The course begins with a brief introduction to Macedonian linguistic history followed by an outline of Macedonian grammar and readings of authentic texts. There is also discussion of questions of grammar, standardization, and Macedonian language in society. Issues of Balkan and Slavic linguistics are also touched upon. 

- / -
Structure of Albanian

20900
30900
EEUR
V. Friedman
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LING 29701/39701
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

This is a rare opportunity to get a functional grasp of one of the least-studied national languages of Europe. Albanian is of relevance for Indo-Europeanists, Balkanists, Classicists, Islamicists, and any social scientist with an interest in Southeastern Europe. In addition to being the majority language in Albania and Kosovo, it is spoken by compact populations in all their neighboring countries, as well as by old enclaves in Italy, Croatia, Bulgaria, Turkey, Romania, and Ukraine, and by more recent émigré groups in Western Europe, North America, and Australia. The course focuses on giving students an understanding of the grammatical structure of Albanian as well as sufficient reading knowledge for the independent development of the ability to pursue research.

- / -
Romani Language and Linguistics

21000
31000
EEUR
V. Friedman
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LING 27810/37810, ANTH 27700/47900
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

An introduction to the language of the Roms (Gypsies).  The course will be based on the Arli diealect currently in official use in the Republic of Macedonia, but due attention will be given to other dialects of Europe and the United States.  The course will begin with an introduction to Romani linguistic history followed by an outline of Romani grammar based on Macedonian Arli.  This will serve as the basis of comparison with other dialects.  The course will include readings of authentic texts and discussion of questions of grammar,  standardization, and Romani language in society.  

- / -
Chekhov

32512
RUSS
Paul Friedrich
Course level: 
Graduate
Crosslists: 
SCTH 32512
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

 The study of four main plays (e.g., Three Sisters) and some of the most crucial short stories (e.g., “The Hunter”). Chekhov is “an incomparable artist of life” who “created new forms,” as Tolstoy put it. Engaging and going beyond these claims, we will examine some recent American productions.

- / -
The Holocaust Object

29500
39500
POLI
Bozena Shallcross
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
JWSC 29500, ANTH 23910, ANTH 35035
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

In this course we explore various ontological and representational modes of the Holocaust material object world as it was represented during WWII. Then, we interrogate the post-Holocaust artifacts and material remnants, as they are displayed, curated, controlled, and narrated in the memorial sites and museums of former ghettos, extermination and concentration camps. These sites which – once the locations of genocide – are now places of remembrance, the (post)human, and material remnants, also serve educational purposes. Therefore, we study the ways in which this material world, ranging from infrastructure to detritus, has been subjected to two, often conflicting, tasks of representation and preservation, which we view through a prism of authenticity. In order to study representation, we critically engage a textual and visual reading of museum narrations and fiction writings; to tackle with demands of preservation we apply a neo-materialist approach. Of special interest are survivors’ testimonies as appended to the artifacts they donated. The course will also equip you with salient critical tools for future creative research in the Holocaust studies.

- / -
The Return of the Soviet: War in Soviet and Post-Soviet Media (Ukraine, Belarus)

24201
34201
RUSS
Andrei Gornykh
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMST 24406, CMST 34406
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

The current war in Ukraine has shown dramatically the power of visual media to construct social and military conflicts, especially in the post-Soviet borderlands. Some observers believe that the media  have created a new geopolitical reality as a kind of phantasm, which explains why in the vast majority of the population in post-Soviet Russia, Belarus and eastern Ukraine support the existing power structures uncritically and even unconditionally. Taking the current situation as a cue, we seek to understand how ideological mechanisms work within visual representations, primarily in representations of war, especially in the construction of the enemy. The roots of the current Russo-Ukrainian conflict will be traced through representations of the Battle of Stalingrad in Soviet and post-Soviet cinema; the image of the partisan in Soviet and post-Soviet media; the work on film of Andrei Tarkovsky, as a symptom of the dialectic of war in Soviet modernity. The representations at issue will mostly be taken from fictional film, but attention will also be paid to other forms of cultural representation: literature, documentary film, television and new media. We will be guided by theoretical resources from critical theory (Marx, Weber, Foucault, Jameson) and psychoanalysis (Freud, Zizek).

- / -
Forms of Lyric from Classical Antiquity to Postmodernism

24501
Boris Maslov
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 24501, CLCV 27109
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

Moving beyond the modern perception of lyric as an expression of the poet’s subjectivity, this course confronts the remarkable longevity of varieties of lyric that have remained in use over centuries and millennia, such as the hymn, ode, pastoral, elegy, epistle, and epigram. What kept these classical genres alive for so long and, conversely, what made them serviceable to poets working in very different cultural milieus? In an effort to develop a theory and a history of Western lyric genres, we will sample from the work of many poets, including Sappho, Horace, Ovid, Hölderlin, Pushkin, Whitman, Mandel’shtam, Brodsky, and Milosz. All readings in English.

- / -
War and Peace

22302
32302
RUSS
William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 22301,CMLT 32301,ENGL 28912,ENGL 32302,FNDL 27103,HIST 23704
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
Russia, Modernity and the Everyday

28805
38805
RUSS
Susanne Cohen
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
ANTH 21805, ANTH 31825
Winter

The question of modernity has long been a central preoccupation in Russia.  On the one hand, the early Soviet project was designed to conjure into being a new society marked by a distinctly socialist version of modernity.  On the other hand, the collapse of the Soviet state in effect delegitimized a particular understanding of what it meant to be modern:  Becoming post-Soviet meant not only the loss of a once promised radiant future, but often felt like a bewildering regression.  This course explores what modernity has meant for ordinary people living in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia, viewing the modern not as an objective break from “tradition,” but as a touchstone for orienting selves, practices, and understandings.  We will focus particularly on everyday life, which served as a primary target of early Soviet change efforts, a wearying reminder of the distance between utopian promises and actually existing socialism, and, in the post-Soviet era, a battleground for establishing new teleologies and new futures amid what could now triumphantly be called truly “global” capitalism.  More generally, readings in social history and the anthropology of postsocialism will provide groundwork for understanding the dramatic social transformations that have occurred in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia and the complex ways in which people have attempted to orient themselves and their everyday practices in shifting trajectories, temporalities, and directionalities.  While Russia will be our focus, we will also draw several cases from elsewhere in the former Soviet bloc with the dual aims of learning from other socialist and postsocialist experiences and exploring the considerable impact of Soviet and Russian modernizing projects on the surrounding region in the socialist period and beyond.

- / -
Intro to Slavic Linguistics

20100
30100
SLAV
Y. Gorbachov
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LING 26400, LING 36400
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

The main goal of this course isto familiarize students with the essential facts of the Slavic linguistic history and with the most characteristic features of the modern Slaviclanguages. In order to understand the development of Proto-Slavic into theexisting Slavic languages and dialects, we focus on a set of basic phenomena. The course is specifically concerned with making students aware of factors that led to the breakup of the Slavic unity and the emergence of the individual languages. Drawing on the historical development, we touch upon such salient typological characteristics of the modern languages such as the rich set of morphophonemic alternations, aspect, free word order, and agreement.

- / -
The Interrupted Word: Photographs in Contemporary Central European Literature of Witness

24411
SLAV
Katie Tucker
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

Occasionally dismissed as a postmodern gimmick, the insertion of photographs into literary texts is nonetheless a conspicuous fact of contemporary prose, and particularly of literature of witness. How do these embedded photographs function? Do they buttress the veracity of testimony? Or, do they mark out an inadequacy, even a failure, of language? Do they support the narrative, or undermine it?  In this course, we will focus on the literary legacy of three historical moments of witness—Germany after WWII, Yugoslav Successor States after the Yugoslav Wars of the 1990s, and Post-Soviet Poland—to ground a theoretical analysis of the function of photographs in texts. We will begin by tracing the history of critical thought on photography, from Benjamin through the seminal works of Sontag and Barthes and finally to the contemporary theories put forth by W.J.T. Mitchell and Slavoj Žižek. As the four novels which will serve as touchstones for our theoretical inquiry (by W.G. Sebald, Dubravka Ugrešić, Aleksandar Hemon, and Paveł Huelle) were all composed at both a temporal and spatial remove from their historical referent, we will also engage the discourses of post-memory and exilic literature.

- / -
Russian Cinema

26048
36048
REES
Robert Bird
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMST 24505, CMST 34505
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

Russian cinema occupies an important and distinctive place within world film culture. It rose to prominence in the 1920s through the revolutionary (in all senses) films and film theory of Sergei Eisenstein, Vsevolod Pudovkin, Dziga Vertov and others and maintained its distinction through the early years of socialist realism, a unique media system in which film was recognized, in Lenin’s saying, as “the most important of the arts.” After Stalin’s death Russian film re-captivated its revolutionary energy amidst the “Soviet new wave,” characterized by the films of Mikhail Kalatozov, Sergei Paradzhanov and Andrei Tarkovsky. In recent years film has continued to play a crucial role in defining and animating a post-Soviet cultural identity, both through poetic filmmakers as Aleksandr Sokurov and through genre films. We will survey this history, from 1917 right up to the present moment, with a selection of the most energizing films and theoretical writings by their makers. We will examine how a national style gets established and maintained; how film form and film style have responded to the pressures of ideology and power; how film art has served both as a tool of colonialization and identity-formation; and how film artists have negotiated the pressures of cultural tradition (including that of the Russian novel) and the world film market.

- / -
Russian Media Culture

25601
35601
REES
William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

Over the past 150 years, various political and cultural regimes of Russia have systematically exploited the gap between experience and representation to create their own mediated worlds--from the tight censorship of the imperial and Soviet periods, to the propaganda of the Soviet period and the recent use of media simulacra for strategic geo-political advantage. During this same period state control of media has been used to seclude Russia from the advancement of liberalism, market economics, individual rights, modernist art, Freud, Existentialism and, more recently, western discourses of inclusion, sustainability, and identity. Examining this history, it is sometimes difficult to discern whether the architects of Russian culture have been hopelessly backward or shrewd phenomenologists, keenly aware of the relativity of experience and of their ability to shape it. This course will explore the worlds that these practices produce, with an emphasis on Russia’s recent confrontations with western culture and power, and including various practices of subversion of media control, such as illegal printing and circulation. Texts for the course will draw from print, sound and visual media, and fields of analysis will include aesthetics, cultural history and media theory.

- / -
Second-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I, II, III

20103
20203
20303
BCSN
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

The Second-Year course in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCS) languages and cultures is a continuation of First-Year BCS. It assumes one year of formal study of the target language(s) or equivalent coursework elsewhere. The course is focused on spoken and written modern BCS, emphasizing communicative practice in authentic cultural contexts. The language(s) are introduced through a series of dialogues gathered from a variety of textbooks published in Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia, as well as newspaper articles, short biographies, poems, and song lyrics in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. A vast amount of audiovisual materials, representing both high and popular culture, constitute an integral part of every unit. Simultaneously, aural comprehension, speaking, grammar, and vocabulary are reinforced and further developed throughout the year with each unit. The course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans, guest speakers, cultural events, and dinner parties. Mandatory drill sessions are held twice per week.

MWF 11:30-12:20 PM

- / -
Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian: Language through Fiction

21100
BCSN
Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn
Language course

This course, which encompasses both the 3rd and 4th years of language study, changes the focus from language structure and grammar to issues in interdisciplinary content. Each module foregrounds a different theme and leverages a different medium—fiction, film, art and architecture, urban anthropology, etc. Unlike the First- and Second-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCS) courses, Advanced BCS courses are not in sequence, and students can take them randomly, over the course of two academic years to fulfill their 3rd and/or 4th year of language study.

- / -
First-Year Czech

10103
CZEC
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
Language course

- / -
First-Year Polish I, II, III

10103
10203
10303
POLI
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g. communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students’ native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure. Autumn, Winter, Spring. Meets on MWF 10:30-11:20. Drill sessions to be arranged.

- / -
Second-Year Polish I, II, III

20103
20203
20303
POLI
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student’s level of preparation. Autumn, Winter, Spring. Meets on MWF 10:30-11:20. Drill sessions to be arranged.
 

- / -
Third-Year Polish I, II, III

30103
30203
30303
POLI
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

PQ: POLI 20300 or equivalent. The process of learning in all three quarters of Third Year Polish is framed by three themes, which most succinctly but aptly characterize the Polish life, culture and history: in the Fall Quarter – the noble democracy in the Commonwealth of Both Nations, in the Winter Quarter – the fight for independence, and in the Spring Quarter – the newly independent Poland. During the course of the year, students also improve their knowledge of advanced grammar and stylistics. All work in Polish. Autumn, Winter, Spring. Meets on MWF 11:30-12:20. Conversation hour to be arranged.

- / -
Polish Through Literary Readings I, II, III

20503
20603
20703
40103
40203
40303
POLI
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

Meets: TBA
PQ: POLI 303 or equivalent. An advanced language course emphasizing spoken and written Polish. Readings include original Polish prose and poetry as well as nonfiction. Intensive grammar review and vocabulary building. For students who have taken Third Year Polish and for native or heritage speakers who want to read Polish literature in the original. Readings and discussions in Polish. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

- / -
First-Year Russian I, II, III

10103
10203
10303
RUSS
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

- / -
Second-Year Russian I, II, III

10103
10203
10303
RUSS
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
PQ: Russ 10300 or Consent of Instructor, Drill Sessions to be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

- / -
Third-Year Russian: Culture I, II, III

20702
20802
20902
RUSS
Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
PQ: RUSS 20300 or Consent of Instructor
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

- / -
Fourth-Year Russian: Short Story I, II, III

21002
21102
21202
RUSS
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
PQ: RUSS 20902 or Consent of Instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

- / -
Advanced Russian Through Media I, II, III

21302
21402
21502
30102
30202
30302
RUSS
Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
PQ: RUSS 21202 or Consent of Instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
Language course

- / -
Russian for Heritage Learners

21600
RUSS
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
Language course

- / -
Special Topics in Advanced Russian

29910
RUSS
Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Must complete Advanced Russian through Media or equivalent, or obtain consent of instructor. Class meets for 2 hours each week.
Autumn
Language course

- / -
The Short Story in Russian Literature

26049
36049
REES
Malynne Sternstein
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

The short story demands versatility and resourcefulness of its author, a creativity and a discipline that distinguishes itself from the same needed for the novel. Russian literature is known best for its hulking novels or for its Golden and Silver Age lyrics. In this course, it is the short story in Russian literary history that is explored and investigated as an alternative locus of expression of a separate ontology. Informed by theories of the short story form, in the course we closely scrutinize the short fiction of Pushkin, Gogol', Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pelevin, Tolstaya, Ulitskaya, among others.

- / -
Czech New Wave Cinema

28002
38002
REES
Malynne Sternstein
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMST 24401, CMST 34401
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
Imaginary Worlds:Fantastic & Magic Realism in Russia & Southeastern Europe

29018
39018
REES
Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Readings in English. Background in Russia and the Balkans will make the course easier, but is not required.
Crosslists: 
CMLT 27701, CMLT 37701
Spring
Literature and Linguistics course

In this course, we will ask what constitutes the fantastic and magic realism as literary genres while reading some of the most interesting writings to have come out of Russia and Southeastern Europe. While considering the stylistic and narrative specificities of this narrative mode, we also think about its political functions —from subversive to escapist, to supportive of a nationalist imaginary—in different contexts and at different historic moments in the two regions.

- / -
Lolita

20004
REES
Malynne Sternstein
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 25300,GNSE 24900,ENGL 28916
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

“Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul, Lolita: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate, to tap at three on the teeth.” Popular as Nabokov’s “all-American” novel is, it is rarely discussed beyond its psychosexual profile. This intensive text-centered and discussion-based course attempts to supersede the univocal obsession with the novel’s pedophiliac plot as such by concerning itself above all with the novel’s language: language as failure, as mania, and as conjuration.

- / -
Balkan Folklore

29009
39009
REES
Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
NEHC 20568,NEHC 30568,CMLT 23301,CMLT 33301,ANTH 25908,ANTH 35908
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

Immerse yourself in the magic world of vampires and dragons, bagpipes and uneven beats, quick-step circle dance. This course give an introduction to Balkan folklore from anthropological, historical/political, and performative perspectives. We become acquainted with folk tales, lyric and epic songs, music, and dance. The work of Milman Parry and Albert Lord, who developed their theory of oral composition through work among epic singers in the Balkans, helps us understand folk tradition as a dynamic process – how is oral tradition transmitted, preserved, changed, forgotten? how do illiterate singers learn their long narrative poems, how do musicians learn to play? We consider the function of different folklore genres in the imagining and maintenance of community and the socialization of the individual. The historical/political part will survey the emergence of folklore studies as a discipline as well as the ways it has served in the formation and propagation of the nation in the Balkans. The class will also experience this living tradition first hand through our in-class workshop with the Chicago based dance ensemble “Balkanski igri.” The Annual Balkan Folklore Spring Festival will be held in March at the International House.

- / -
The Burden of History: The Nation and Its Lost Paradise

29013
39013
REES
Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23401,CMLT 33401,NEHC 20573,NEHC 30573,HIST 24005,HIST 34005
Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

The Other Within the Self: Identity in Balkan Literature and Film. This two-course sequence examines discursive practices in a number of literary and cinematic works from the South East corner of Europe through which identities in the region become defined by two distinct others: the “barbaric, demonic” Ottoman and the “civilized” Western European. This course begins by defining the nation both historically and conceptually, with attention to Romantic nationalism and its flourishing in Southeastern Europe. We then look at the narrative of original wholeness, loss, and redemption through which Balkan countries retell their Ottoman past. With the help of Freud's analysis of masochistic desire and Žižek's theory of the subject as constituted by trauma, we contemplate the national fixation on the trauma of loss and the dynamic between victimhood and sublimity. The figure of the Janissary highlights the significance of the other in the definition of the self. Some possible texts are Petar Njegoš's Mountain Wreath; Ismail Kadare's The Castle; and Anton Donchev's Time of Parting.

- / -
Pushkin and Gogol

26047
36047
REES
Robert Bird
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 26047
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837) is widely considered the founding genius of modern Russian literature, especially in his lyric and epic poetry; Nikolai Gogol (1809-1852) injected a manic strain of magic realism to create the modern Russian novel. Apollon Grigor’ev later called Pushkin “our everything”; Dostoevsky claimed “We all emerged out of Gogol’s ‘Overcoat.’” During the quarter we will read a representative selection of both writers’ major works, including Pushkin’s verse novel Evgenii Onegin, verse epic The Bronze Horseman, and novel The Captain’s Daughter, and Gogol’s novel Dead Souls in addition to his fantastic stories “The Nose” and “The Overcoat.” We will focus on close readings of the texts, paying particular attention to their experiments with literary form, as well as attending to their broader historical contextualization. We will focus particularly on the conceptions of realism projected by the texts and imposed by later readers. All readings will be in English translation.

- / -
Returning the Gaze: The Balkans and Western Europe

29012
39012
REES
Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23201,CMLT 33201,NEHC 20885,NEHC 30885
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

This course provides insight into identity dynamics between the “West,” as the center of economic power and self-proclaimed normative humanity, and the “Rest,” as the poor, backward, volatile periphery.  We investigate the relationship between South East European self-representations and the imagined Western gaze. Inherent in the act of looking at oneself through the eyes of another is the privileging of that other’s standard.  We will contemplate the responses to this existential position of identifying symbolically with a normative site outside of oneself -- self-consciousness, defiance, arrogance, self-exoticization -- and consider how these responses have been incorporated in the texture of the national, gender, and social identities in the region. 

Orhan Pamuk, Ivo Andrić, Nikos Kazantzakis, Aleko Konstantinov, Emir Kusturica, Milcho Manchevski

- / -
Gender in the Balkans: Sworn Virgins, Wounded Men & Eternal Mothers

29016
39016
REES
Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23902,CMLT 33902, GNSE 27607
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

Through some of the best literary and cinematic works from Southeastern Europe, we will consider the questions of socialization into gendered modes of being – the demands, comforts, pleasures and frustrations that individuals experience while trying to embody and negotiate social categories. We will examine how masculinity and femininity are constituted in the traditional family model, the socialist paradigm, and during post-socialist transitions. We will also contemplate how gender categories are experienced through other forms of identity–the national and socialist especially–as well as how gender is used to symbolize and animate these other identities. The course assumes no prior knowledge of the history of Southeastern Europe, literature or gender theory. All readings in English translation.

- / -
B.A. Paper Workshop

29700
REES
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
Reading/Research: Russian and Eastern European Studies

29900
REES
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
Literature and Linguistics course

- / -
Tear Down This Wall!”: Language and Society in 20th Century Poland

27024
37024
REES
Kinga Kosmala and Erik Houle
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn
Literature and Linguistics course

This course surveys the pragmatics and sociolinguistic aspects of language usage in propaganda and mass media in Poland throughout the 20th century. Poland was an epicenter of the tumultuous 20th century: two world wars, a short period of independence, communism, the Solidarity movement, entrance into the European Union, and becoming one of Europe’s leading economies. These extreme shifts have been reflected in the Polish language. This course will introduce students to the role of language as an active participant in Poland's history through an analysis of the languages of dominant discourse and commodification (propaganda, media, pop culture) and will examine the tactics of influence from a linguistic point of view.

- / -
Narratives of Assimilation<