Fall 2008 Courses

Slavic Department Listings

Jump to current courses in: BCSN CZEC EEUR SLAV POLI RUSS SOSL

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCSN)

10100/31000 Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. Knowledge of a Slavic language and background in linguistics not required. The major objective of the course is to build a solid foundation inthe basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian,while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. Thiscourse is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans andis designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time. N. Petkovic.

20100/32000 Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. PQ: BCSN 10300 or consent of instructor. The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time. N. Petkovic.

29700 Reading and Research Course: Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

30100 Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I. PQ: BCSN 20300 or consent of instructor. This course is tailored to the needs of the students enrolled, depending on their concentration in the field. It enhances language acquisition with continuous reading and translation of essays, newspaper articles, literary excerpts, letters and other selected writings. Vocabulary building is emphasized by the systematic study of nominal and verbal roots, prefixes and suffixes, and word formation thereafter. Discussion follows each completed reading with a written composition assigned in relation to the topic. N. Petkovic.

Czech (CZEC)

10100 Elementary Czech I.This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research. Staff.

20100 Second-Year Czech I. PQ: CZEC 10300 or consent of instructor. The main emphasis of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students. Staff.

29700 Reading and Research Course: Czech/Slovak Language and Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

35000 Reading Course: Czech/Slovak Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

39900 Reading Course: Czech/Slovak Literature. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

49900 Dissertation Research: Czech/Slovak.

East European (EEUR)

21100/31100 Elementary Modern Armenian I. (=ARME 10101-10102-10103) This three-quarter sequence utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling the students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet, and basic grammatical structures, as well as to achieve a reasonable level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). Considerable amounts of historical/political and social/cultural issues about Armenia are built into the course to prepare students who intend to conduct research in Armenian studies or to pursue work in Armenia. H. Haroutunian.

29700 Reading and Research Course: East European Language and Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

35000  Reading Course: East European Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

39900  Reading Course: East European Literature. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

49900 Dissertation Research: Eastern Europe.

General Slavic (SLAV)

20100/30100  Introduction to Slavic Linguistics. (=LING 26400/36400).  The main goal of this course is to familiarize students with the essential facts of the Slavic linguistic history and with the most characteristic features of the modern Slavic languages. In order to understand the development of Proto-Slavic into the existing Slavic languages and dialects, we focus on a set of basic phenomena. The course is specifically concerned with making students aware of factors that led to the breakup of the Slavic unity and the emergence of the individual languages. Drawing on the historical development, we touch upon such salient typological characteristics of the modern languages such as the rich set of morphophonemic alternations, aspect, free word order, and agreement. L. Grenoble.

22400/32400 History of East Slavic Linguistics. PQ: Knowledge of at least one East Slavic language. This course give a history of the East Slavic diasystem from Old Rusian to the modern Belarusan, Russian, and Ukrainian languages. Both dialectology and histories of the literary languages will be covered. Y. Gorbachov.

29700  Reading and Research Course. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900  B.A. Paper Preparation. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

35000  Reading Course: General Slavic Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

39900  Reading Course: General Slavic Literature. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

46000  Pro-Seminar: Literary and Interdisciplinary Studies. Open only to graduate students.

49900 Dissertation Research: General Slavic.

Polish (POLI)

10100 Elementary Polish I. This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g., communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students’ native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure. J. Kurowska-Mlynarczyk.

20100 Second-Year Polish I.PQ: POLI 10300 or equivalent. This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student’s level of preparation. J. Kurowska-Mlynarczyk.

26000/36000 Introduction to Polish Literature I: From the Beginnings to the Eighteenth Century. (=ISHU 26001/36001). This course is a survey of major works and writers from medieval texts to the Enlightenment. Particular attention is paid to the development of Polish as a poetic language and to the use of literary genres. We read works by Rey, Kochanowski, Pasek, Krasicki, and others. (No knowledge of Polish required.)  B. Shallcross.

29700 Reading and Research Course: Polish Literature and Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

35000 Reading Course: Polish Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

39900 Reading Course: Polish Literature. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

49900 Dissertation Research: Polish.

Russian (RUSS)

10100 First-Year Russian I. This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Staff.

10400 Russian through Pushkin I. Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300. This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin’s shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Staff.

20100 Second-Year Russian I. PQ: RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor. This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Staff.

20400 Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year I. PQ: RUSS 10600. This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Staff.

20702 Third-Year Russian through Culture I. PQ: RUSS 20300 (two years of Russian) or equivalent. This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week. V. Pichugin.

21002 Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story I. PQ: Three years of Russian or equivalent. This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week. A. Dombrowski.

21302/30102 Advanced Russian through Media I. PQ: RUSS 21200 or consent of instructor. This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week. V. Pichugin.

21600 Russian for Heritage Learners. PQ: Ability to speak Russian fluently required; formal training in Russian not required. This course examines the major aspects of Russian grammar and stylistics essential for heritage learners. Students engage in close readings and discussions of short stories by classic and contemporary Russian authors (e.g., Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Platonov, Bulgakov, Erofeev, Tolstaya), with special emphasis on their linguistic and stylistic differences. All work in Russian. L. Ginzburg.

22401  Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina. (=FUND 27101, ISHU 22102). Tolstoy’s most famous novel has been the subject of critical controversy ever since its first serialized publication in the 1870s. This course will be dedicated to a slow and close reading and careful interpretation of Tolstoy’s masterpiece. The course will also include several additional short works by Tolstoy on love.  Readings, discussion, and the papers are in English. Russian majors will have an option of reading the text in the original and discussing it in a special Russian intensive section. S. Larsen. 

22902/32902 Classic Yiddish Fiction. (=GRMN 27708/37708, CMLT 29401/39401, ENGL 28908/48908) The seminar will examine the Yiddish writer Scholem-Aleichem’s work as a prime example of the diasporic imagination in modern Jewish culture. The writer’s greatest achievement was his monologues, oral narrative performances such as Tevye the Dairyman, the Railroad Stories and Menakhem Mendel. These key texts will be discussed in the context of Russian Jewry’s crisis and transformation at the turn of the twentieth century. Scholem-Aleichem’s political development will be traced in his relationship to the two dominant ideologies in Jewish Eastern Europe prior to World War I: Socialism and Zionism. Finally, Scholem-Aleichem’s encounter with America during his visit in 1905-1906 and his immigration in 1914 will be discussed in connection with his play writing for the Yiddish stage and cinema. The course will delineate Scholem-Aleichem’s unique literary universe and style, the pivotal expression of classic Yiddish fiction that remains one of the most original expressions of the diasporic imagination in modern Jewish culture. J. Schwarz.

23500/33500  Doctor Zhivago.(=FUND 23512). Boris Pasternak’s novel was the swansong of Russian modernism and the harbinger of the period of the Thaw in the USSR. Fifty years after its illicit publication in the West, and twenty years after its first publication in the USSR, controversy continues to swirl around the novel. Critics dispute whether it should be read as a twentieth-century War and Peace, as a Russian counterpart to Joyce’s Ulysses, or as a typical “poet’s novel” like Rilke’s Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge. In addition to the novel we will read other poetry and prose by Pasternak. R. Bird.

23800/33800 Mandel’shtam and Celan. (=CMLT 23801/33801).Both the Russian poet Osip Mandel’shtam and the German poet Paul Celan envisioned a poem as a “message in a bottle” written to an unknown reader in the future. Placing ourselves in the position of such a reader we will conduct a detailed reading of the poetry and prose of these two poets—one who died in a holocaust in the east, the other who survived the Holocaust in the west—to try to decipher what this message may be. Particular emphasis will be place on the ways in which poetics and ethics overlap for both authors. Secondary readings will likely include works by Tynyanov, Heidegger, Levinas, Bakhtin and Adorno. No knowledge of Russian or German expected. T. Dolack.

24500/34500 Soviet Culture after Stalin, 1953-1968. This is an interdisciplinary course that will explore the visual and literary culture of the Soviet Union between Stalin’s death in early 1953 and the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in late 1968. We will examine influential texts, images, and cultural practices – whether state-sanctioned, underground, or dissident – within the context of the policies and institutions that shaped their production, distribution or performance, and reception. Time and attention devoted to particular topics will be adjusted to match the interests of seminar participants. The course will be conducted in English, but all assigned texts will be available in both Russian and in English translation, or, in the case of films, with subtitles. S. Larsen.

25500/35500 Russian Literature from Classicism to Romanticism. (=HUMA 24000, ISHU 22400). Russia acquired a modern literature in the eighteenth century, during the ascendancy of the neo-classicist aesthetics, leading to a flowering of literary culture in the 1830s at the hands of such writers as Pushkin, Lermonotov, and Gogol. The so-called “Golden Age” of Russian literature existed in a creative tension both with the neo-classical heritage and with contemporary developments in Western Europe, most notably Romanticism. This survey of eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Russian literature includes works by Lomonosov, Derzhavin, Radishchev, Karamzin, Zhukovskii, Pushkin, Griboedov, Baratynskii, Lermontov, and early Gogol. Texts in English and the original. Optional Russian-intensive section offered. T. Dolack. 

29700 Reading and Research Course: Russian Language and Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

34300 Brothers Karamazov in Russian Culture. (=SOSC  32550, ANTH 34803). We read and interpret The Brothers Karamazov by Dostoevsky. Among major themes are the nature of human guilt in relation to God and society; the problem of evil, and how the existence of evil in the world affects religious beliefs; the pros and cons of "freedom," and what the word might have meant to Dostoevsky; and love. P. Friedrich.

35000 Reading Course: Russian Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

35200 East Slavic Literature 1300-1600. Y. Gorbachov.

39900 Reading Course: Russian Literature. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

49900 Dissertation Research: Russian.

South Slavic (SOSL)

10100/30100 Elementary Bulgarian I. This course provides an introduction to all of the basic principles of the Bulgarian language. P. Alexieva.

27200/37200 Returning the Gaze: The Balkans and Western Europe. (=CMLT 23201/33201, NEHC 20885/30885, ISHU 27406). This course will investigate the complex relationship between South East European self-representations and the imagined Western “gaze” for whose benefit the nations stage their quest for identity and their aspirations for recognition. We will focus on the problems of Orientalism, Balkanism and nesting orientalisms, as well as on self-mythologization, self-exoticization, and obstinate otherness. We will also think about differing models of masculinity, and of the figure of the gypsy as a metaphor for the national self in relation to the West, and the myths the Balkans tell about themselves. The course will conclude by considering the role that the imperative to belong to Western Europe played in the Yugoslav wars of succession. Some possible texts/films are Ivo Andrić, Bosnian Chronicle, Aleko Konstantinov, Baj Ganyo, Emir Kusturica, Underground, Milcho Manchevski, Before the Rain. A. Ilieva.

27600/37600 Cinema from the Balkans. (=CMLT 22601,CMLT 32601, ISHU 27603, SOSL 37600, CMST 24402, CMST 34402). This course is designed as an overview of major cinematic works from Bulgaria, Albania, Greece, Rumania, former Yugsolavia and Turkey. While the main criterion for selection will be the artistic quality of the work, the main issues under consideration will be those of identity, gender, the poignant relation with the “Western World,” memories of conflict and violence, socialism, its disintegration and subsequent emigration. We will compare the conceptual categories through which these films make sense of the world and especially the sense of humor with which they come to terms with that world. Some directors whose work we will examine: Vulchanov, Andonova (Bulgaria), Kusturica, Makavejev, Grlic (Former Yugoslavia), Guney (Turkey), Boulmetis (Greece), Manchevski (Macedonia). A. Ilieva.

29700 Reading and Research Course: South Slavic Language and Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

35000  Reading Course: South Slavic Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

39900 Reading Course: South Slavic Literature. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

49900 Dissertation Research: South Slavic.