Spring 2009 Courses

Slavic Department Listings

Jump to current courses in: BCSN CZEC EEUR SLAV POLI RUSS SOSL

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCSN)

10300/31200 Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III. PQ: BCSN 10200/31100 or consent of instructor. N. Petkovic.

20300/32200 Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III. PQ: BCSN 20200/32100 or consent of instructor. N. Petkovic.

29700. Reading and Research Course: Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian.  PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation.

30300 Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III. PQ: BCSN 30200 or consent of instructor. N. Petkovic.

Czech (CZEC)

10300 Elementary Czech III.PQ: CZEC 10200 or consent of instructor. Staff.

20300 Second-Year Czech III. PQ: CZEC 20200 or consent of instructor. Staff.

26800 Bringing up the Novel in Bohemia. The aim of this course is to explore the newly created history of the Czech novel using Michael Viewegh's novel, Bringing up Girls in Bohemia,  as a guide.  The course will begin by looking at the novel and exploring the problems it raises. We will then begin to trace the Czech novel as presented in Bringing Up Girls in Bohemia. The course will then look at the development of the Czech novel through the works of Franz Kafka, Karel Čapek, Milan Kundera, Josef Škvorecký, and Bohumil Hrabal.  Finally, the course will end by rereading Viewegh and some of his contemporaries (such as Jachým Topol and Daniela Hodrová) within the context of this newly formed history of the Czech novel. E. Peters.

29700 Reading and Research Course: Czech. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation.

35000 Reading Course: Czech/Slovak Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

39900 Reading Course: Czech/Slovak Literature. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

49900 Dissertation Research: Czech/Slovak.

East European (EEUR)

21300/31300 Elementary Modern Armenian III. PQ: EEUR 21200 or consent of instructor. H. Haroutunian.

29700 Reading and Research Course: East European Language and Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

35000  Reading Course: East European Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter,Spring.

39900  Reading Course: EEUR/Caucasian Literature. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

49900 Dissertation Research: Eastern Europe.

General Slavic (SLAV)

20500/30500 Corpus Linguistics. (=LING 27340/37340). This course introduces the use of language corpora (large-scale electronic collections of authentic written and spoken language) in linguistic research from both soft (qualitative) and hard (quantitative) perspectives. Students will receive hands-on experience in corpus processing and data analysis and will learn how to work with existing corpora for their languages of interest as well as how to construct corpora of their own. Particular attention will be paid to the role of the corpus as a source of linguistic data and to the potential of corpus methods to enrich research in other theoretical frameworks, such as usage-based linguistics, construction grammar, cognitive linguistics, and functional linguistics. S. Clancy.

28600/38600 Kitsch. (=GRMN 26100/36100, ISHU 28200/38200). This course explores the concept of kitsch (and its attendants: camp, trash, and the Russian poshlost) as it has been formulated in literature and literary essays and theorized in modern critical thinking. The course is discussion-intensive with readings from Theodor Adorno, Clement Greenberg, Robert Musil, Hermann Broch, Walter Benjamin, Vladimir Nabokov, Milan Kundera, Matei Calinescu, and Tomas Kulka. No prior experience of kitsch is necessary. M. Sternstein.

29700 Reading and Research Course: General Slavic Language and Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

31500 Teaching in Slavic Languages and Literatures. S. Clancy.

35000 Reading Course: General Slavic Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

39900 Reading Course: General Slavic Literature. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.  Autumn, Winter, Spring.

40200 Translating Theory. (=CDIN 51200, ENGL 59303,CMLT 51200, GERM 51200) PQ: Active working knowledge of at least one source language: French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish; possibly Dutch. Admission to seminar based on ashort in-class translation. R. Bird; L. Kruger.

49900 Dissertation Research: General Slavic.

Polish (POLI)

10300 Elementary Polish III. PQ: POLI 10200 or consent of instructor. J. Kurowska-Mlynarczyk.

20300 Second-Year Polish III. PQ: POLI 20200 or consent of instructor. J. Kurowska-Mlynarczyk.

261200/36200 Introduction to Polish Literature III: Twentieth Century. (=ISHU 26202/36202) Knowledge of Polish not required. This survey discusses major artistic periods and trends from symbolism and avant-garde through ŽmigrŽ and thaw literatures to the post-Communist writings. Major writers we read are Staff, Schulz, Witkiewicz, Gombrowicz, Nalkowska, Konwicki, Mrozek, and many others. B. Shallcross.

29700 Reading and Research Course: Polish Language and Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and DepartmentalAdviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation.

35000 Reading Course: Polish Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

39900 Reading Course: Polish Literature. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

49900 Dissertation Research: Polish.

Russian (RUSS)

10300 First-Year Russian III. PQ: RUSS 10200 or consent of instructor.  Staff.

10600 Russian through Pushkin III. Not open to students enrolled in 10300. PQ: RUSS 10500 or consent of instructor. Staff.

20300 Second-Year Russian III. PQ: RUSS 20200 or consent of instructor. Staff.

20600 Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year III. PQ: RUSS 20500 or consent of instructor. Staff.

20902 Third-Year Russian through Culture III. PQ: RUSS 20802 or consent of instructor. V. Pichugin.

21202 Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story III. PQ: RUSS 21102 or consent of instructor. Staff.

21502/30302 Advanced Russian through Media III. PQ: RUSS 21402 or consent of instructor. V. Pichugin.

27500/37500 Dostoevsky. This course will comprise a close reading of key works in Dostoevsky's oeuvre, from his early fiction and Notes from Underground to Crime and Punishment and The Writer's Diary. While remaining alert to the biographical and historical context of his writing, we will trace the development of Dostoevsky's peculiar treatment of central philosophical and theological problems, paying particular attention to the way that they inform his radical transformation of European literary forms. Lectures will explore how Dostoevsky's legacy has been appropriated in art (especially cinema) and philosophy, from Nietzsche to Existentialism and Levinas. All readings will be in English translation; no knowledge of Russian required. R. Bird.

27900/37900  Chekhov’s Modernity. (=CMLT 21301/31301) This course is dedicated to one of the founders and crucial exponents of modernism, Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860-1904). One of the first authors to employ the “stream of consciousness” technique in his narratives, Chekhov is considered one of the best short story writers in the history of literature. As a playwright, Chekhov is famous for such plays as “The Seagull,” “Uncle Vanya,” “Three Sisters” and “The Cherry Orchard,” in which by the so-called “mood theater” replaces traditional theatricality.  In analyzing Chekhov’s stories and plays, we will trace the legacy of the classical Russian literature, especially Tolstoy and Turgenev; we will also draw parallels between Chekhov’s theatrical experimentations and similar innovations in the works of such contemporaries as Strindberg and Ibsen. L. Steiner.

28901/38901 Reading Russian Poetry. S. Larsen.

South Slavic (SOSL)

10300/30300 Elementary Bulgarian III. PQ: SOSL 10200 or consent of instructor. P. Alexieva.

27300/37300. The Burden of History: A Nation and Its Lost Paradise. (=CMLT 23401/33401, ISHU 26606, NEHC 20573/30573) This course begins by defining the nation both historically and conceptually, with attention to Romantic nationalism and its flourishing in Southeastern Europe. We then look at the narrative of original wholeness, loss, and redemption through which Balkan countries retell their Ottoman past. With the help of Freud’s analysis of masochistic desire and Žižek’s theory of the subject as constituted by trauma, we contemplate the national fixation on the trauma of loss and the dynamic between victimhood and sublimity. The figure of the Janissary highlights the significance of the other in the definition of the self. Some possible texts are Petar Njegoš’s Mountain Wreath; Ismail Kadare’s The Castle; and Anton Donchev’s Time of Parting. A. Ilieva.

27400/37400. Magic Realist and Fantastic Writings from the Balkans. (=CMLT 22201/32201) In this course, we ask whether there is such a thing as a “Balkan” type of magic realism and think about the differences between the genres of magic realism and the fantastic, while reading some of the most interesting writing to have come out of the Balkans. We also look at the similarities of the works from different countries (e.g., lyricism of expression, eroticism, nostalgia) and argue for and against considering such similarities constitutive of an overall Balkan sensibility. A. Ilieva.

29700 Reading and Research Course: South Slavic Language and Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

30400 Comparative South Slavic. PQ:  Knowledge of at least one South Slavic language or consent of the instructor. This course will concentrate on the history and dialectology of the South Slavic languages, but there will also be discussion of the structural and sociolinguistic phenomena. Staff.

35000  Reading Course: South Slavic Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

39900 Reading Course: South Slavic Literature. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

49900 Dissertation Research: South Slavic.