Winter 2009 Courses

Slavic Department Listings

Jump to current courses in: BCSN CZEC EEUR SLAV POLI RUSS SOSL

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCSN)

10200/31100 Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. PQ: BCSN 10100 or consent of instructor.

20200/32100 Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. PQ: BCSN 10300 or consent of instructor.

29700 Reading and Research Course: Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

30200 Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. PQ: BCSN 20100 or consent of instructor.

Czech (CZEC)

10200 Elementary Czech II. PQ: CZEC 10100 or consent of instructor.

20200 Second-Year Czech II. PQ: CZEC 10300 or consent of instructor.

East European (EEUR)

20900/30900 Structure of Albanian (=LGLN 29700/39700). This is a rare opportunity to get a functional grasp of one of the least-studied national languages of Europe. Albanian is of relevance for Indo-Europeanists, Balkanists, Classicists, Islamicists, and any social scientist with an interest in Southeastern Europe. In addition to being the majority language in Albania, it is spoken by compact populations in all neighboring countries, as well as by old enclaves in Italy, Croatia, Bulgaria, Turkey, Romania, and Ukraine, and by more recent emigré groups in Western Europe, North America, and Australia. The course focuses on giving students an understanding of the grammatical structure of Albanian as well as sufficient reading knowledge for the independent development of the ability to pursue research. K. Maynard.

21200/31200 Elementary Modern Armenian II. PQ: EEUR 21100 or consent of instructor. H. Haroutunian.

29700 Reading and Research Course: East European Language and Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

35000  Reading Course: East European Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

39900  Reading Course: EEUR/Caucasian Literature. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.  Autumn, Winter, Spring.

49900 Dissertation Research: Eastern Europe.

General Slavic (SLAV)

22000/32000 Old Church Slavonic. PQ: Knowledge of another Slavic language or good knowledge of one or two other old Indo-European languages required; SLAV 20100/30100 recommended. This course introduces the language of the oldest Slavic texts. It begins with a brief historical overview of the relationship of Old Church Slavonic to Common Slavic and the other Slavic languages. This is followed by a short outline of Old Church Slavonic inflectional morphology. The remainder of the course is spent in the reading and grammatical analysis of original texts. Texts in Cyrillic or Cyrillic transcription of the original Glagolitic. Y. Gorbachov.

29700 Reading and Research Course: General Slavic Language and Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

35000  Reading Course: General Slavic Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter,Spring.

39900  Reading Course: General Slavic Literature. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.  Autumn, Winter, Spring.

49900 Dissertation Research: General Slavic.

Polish (POLI)

10200 Elementary Polish II. PQ: POLI 10100 or consent of instructor. See POLI 10100 for description. J. Kurowska-Mlynarczyk.

20200 Second-Year Polish II. PQ: POLI 20100 or consent of instructor. See POLI 20100 for description. J. Kurowska-Mlynarczyk.

26100/36100 Introduction to Polish Literature II: Nineteenth Century. (=ISHU 26102/36102) Knowledge of Polish not required. This survey covers the major literary development from Romanticism to Positivism within the European philosophical and political context. We read canonical works by Mickiewicz, Slowacki, Krasinski, Norwid, Prus, Orzeszkowa, and others. B. Shallcross.

29700 Reading and Research Course: Polish Language and Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation.

35000 Reading Course: Polish Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

39900 Dissertation Research: Polish Literature. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

49900 Dissertation Research: Polish.

Russian (RUSS)

10200 First-Year Russian II. PQ: RUSS 10100 or consent of instructor.  Staff.

10500 Russian through Pushkin II. Not open to students enrolled in 10200. PQ: RUSS 10400 or consent of instructor. Staff.

20200 Second-Year Russian II. PQ: RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor. Staff.

20500 Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year II. PQ: RUSS 20400 or consent of instructor. Staff.

20802 Third-Year Russian through Culture II. PQ: RUSS 20701or consent of instructor. V. Pichugin.

21102 Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story II. PQ: RUSS 21002 or consent of instructor. Staff.

21402 Advanced Russian through Media II. PQ: RUSS 21302 or consent of instructor. V. Pichugin.

24103/34103 Pushkin and Romanticism. (=ISHU 24104/34104, =CMLT 23501/33501). This course examines the career of Russia’s revered poet in the context of one of the most influential contemporary aesthetic and intellectual movements, Romanticism. The readings will include works by Pushkin and his contemporaries, including the poets Zhukovskii, Boratynskii, Küchelbecker, as well as some critical and theoretical works on Romanticism by Rene Welleck, Geoffrey Hartman, and Paul de Man. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Knowledge of Russian is expected. L. Steiner.

24200/34200 Soviet Literature: Above and Below Ground. Through this course students will be introduced to the concepts of samizdat/tamizdat/magnitizdat in the Russian context, as well as the general theoretical frameworks of propaganda and ideology.  By engaging students in close readings of the texts, we will analyze the distinction between propaganda and dissident literature.  Questions include, but are not limited to, the following: Is ideology a static backdrop throughout the Soviet period? How does ideology inform works that are either published or considered dissident literature? What makes a work of art successful in this historical context? What makes a work publishable? What kind of audience are these works of art attempting to reach? K. Duda, K. Hill.

25600/35600 Realism in Russia. (=HUMA 24000, ISHU 22400/32400, RUSS 35600). From the 1830s to the 1890s, most Russian prose writers and playwrights were either engaged in the European-wide cultural movement known as “realistic school,” which set for itself the task of engaging with social processes from the standpoint of political ideologies. The ultimate goal of this course is to distill more precise meanings of “realism,” “critical realism,” and “naturalism” in nineteenth-century Russian through analysis of works by Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Aleksandr Ostrovsky, Goncharov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, and Kuprin. Texts in English and the original. Optional Russian-intensive section offered. L. Steiner.

25900/35900 History and the Russian Novel. (=HIST 23601/3301). Each week, a lecture will present the historical, intellectual, and literary setting of each novel, followed by a discussion class on the novel of the week in the context of the earlier lecture. Depending upon availability, ten novels will be chosen from the following: Radishchev, Journey; Gogol, Dead Souls; Turgenev, Fathers and Sons; Dostoevskii, Crime and Punishment; Tolstoi, Anna Karenina; Belyi, Petersburg; Gladkov, Cement; Fadeev, The Rout; Sholokhov, Virgin Soil Upturned; Erenburg, The Thaw; Solzhenitsyn, The First Circle; Rybakov, Children of the Arbat. R. Hellie.

28400/38400  Russian Symbolism. From 1894 to 1913 Symbolism was the dominant artistic movement in Russia. Though it is most closely associated with the poetic works of Bal’mont, Gippius, Sologub, Annensky, and Blok (among others), it also found vivid expression in painting, performance and even music. It was the first artistic school in Russia to receive full development as an aesthetic doctrine, especially at the hands of Briusov, Belyi and Ivanov. Moreover, Russian Symbolism can hardly be understood without study of its Western and Eastern European precedents. We will sample all the major authors, genres and media of Russian Symbolism and consider major scholarly approaches in order to arrive at a conceptualization of the movement as a whole. R. Bird.

29700 Reading and Research Course: Russian Language and Linguistics.  PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation.

35000  Reading Course: Russian Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

39900 Reading Course: Russian Literature. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

49900 Dissertation Research: Russian.

South Slavic (SOSL)

26500/36500 Twentieth-Century Literatures from the Balkans. (=CMLT 23101/33101, HUMA 27407, NEHC 20881/30881) This course examines the works of major writers from former Yugsolavia, Bulgaria, Albania, Rumania, Greece, and Turkey from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We examine how their works grapple with the issues of national identity and their countries‚ with their place in the Balkans and in Europe, with the legacies of the Austro-Hungarian and the Ottoman Empires, with socialism and its demise, with emigration, as well as simply with the modern experience of being. We compare the conceptual and mythic categories through which these works make sense of the world and argue for and against considering such categories constitutive of an overall Balkan sensibility. Readings include works by Orhan Pamuk, Ivo Andri, Norman Manea, Mesa Selimovi, Danilo Kis, Miroslav Krleza, and Ismail Kadare. A. Ilieva.

26800/36800 Balkan Folklore. This course will give an overview of Balkan folklore from ethnographic, anthropological, historical/political, and performative perspectives. We will become acquainted with folk tales, lyric and epic songs, music, and dance. The work of Milman Parry and Albert Lord, who developed their theory of oral composition through work among epic singers in the Balkans, will help us understand folk tradition as a dynamic process. We will also consider the function of different folklore genres in the imagining and maintenance of community and the socialization of the individual. The historical/political part will survey the emergence of folklore studies as a discipline as well as the ways it has served in the formation and propagation of the nation in the Balkans. The class will also experience this living tradition first hand through our visit to the classes and rehearsals of the Chicago based ensemble “Balkanske igre.” A. Ilieva.

29700 Reading and Research Course: South Slavic Language and Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900 B.A. Paper Preparation. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

32100 Structure of Bosnian/Serbian/Croatian. PQ: Knowledge of BCS or consent of the instructor. This course teaches the linguistic structure of the southern part of the western South Slavic diasystem that has given rise to the modern Bosnian, Croatian, Montegrin, and Serbian standard languages. All the basic modules of grammatical analysis of the standard languages will be covered. Staff.

32200 History of Bosnian, Serbian, Croatian. PQ: Knowledge of BCS or consent of the instructor. This course gives a history of the southern part of the western South Slavic diasystem taking Common South Slavic and Old Church Slavonic as the starting point and tracing the relevant developments to the modern Bosnian, Croatian, Montegrin, and Serbian standard  languages. Staff.

35000  Reading Course: South Slavic Linguistics. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

39900 Reading Course: South Slavic Literature. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

49900 Dissertation Research: South Slavic.