Fall 2010 Courses

Slavic Department Listings

Courses 2010-2011 Quick Reference

Jump to current courses in: BCSN CZEC EEUR SLAV POLI RUSS SOSL

Bosnian/Croation/Serbian (BCSN)

Language

10100/31000. Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I.

Knowledge of a Slavic language and background in linguistics not required. The major objective of the course is to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time. N. Petkovic. Autumn.

20100/32000. Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I.

PQ: BCSN 10300 or consent of instructor. The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time. N. Petkovic. Autumn.

30100. Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I.

PQ: BCSN 20300 or consent of instructor. This course is tailored to the needs of the students enrolled, depending on their concentration in the field. It enhances language acquisition with continuous reading and translation of essays, newspaper articles, literary excerpts, letters and other selected writings. Vocabulary building is emphasized by the systematic study of nominal and verbal roots, prefixes and suffixes, and word formation thereafter. Discussion follows each completed reading with a written composition assigned in relation to the topic. N. Petkovic. Autumn.

Literature and Linguistics

29700. Reading and Research Course.

PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form Staff. Autumn.

Czech (CZEC)

Language

10100. Elementary Czech I.

This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research. Staff. Autumn.

20100. Second-Year Czech I.

PQ: CZEC 10300 or consent of instructor. The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students Staff. Autumn.

Literature and Linguistics

29700. Reading and Research Course.

PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Staff. Autumn.

29900. BA Paper.

PQ: Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade. Staff. Autumn.

 

East European (EEUR)

Language

21100/31100. Elementary Modern Armenian I. (=ARME 10101)

This three-quarter sequence utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids to enable students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet, and basic grammatical structures, as well as to achieve a reasonable level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). Considerable amounts of historical/political and social/cultural issues about Armenia are built into this sequence to prepare students who intend to conduct research in Armenian studies or to pursue work in Armenia. H. Haroutunian. Autumn.

Literature and Linguistics

33000. Balkan History from the Arrival of the Sklavenoi.

This course will guide students through the most important primary and secondary sources on the history of Southeastern Europe beginning with the arrival of the Sklavenoi and continuing to the end of the twentieth century. Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of at least one of the modern standard languages of the Balkans and consent of the instructor. V. Friedman. Autumn.

General Slavic (SLAV)

Language

20100/30100. Introduction to Slavic Linguistics. (=LING 26400, LING 36400)

The main goal of this course is to familiarize students with the essential facts of the Slavic linguistic history and with the most characteristic features of the modern Slavic languages. In order to understand the development of Proto-Slavic into the existing Slavic languages and dialects, we focus on a set of basic phenomena. The course is specifically concerned with making students aware of factors that led to the breakup of the Slavic unity and the emergence of the individual languages. Drawing on the historical development, we touch upon such salient typological characteristics of the modern languages such as the rich set of morphophonemic alternations, aspect, free word order, and agreement. Y. Gorbachov. Autumn.

29900. BA Paper.

PQ: Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade. Staff. Autumn.

Literature and Linguistics

46000. Pro-Seminar: Literary and Interdisciplinary Studies.

M. Sternstein. Autumn.

Polish (POLI)

Language

10100. Elementary Polish I.

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g., communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure. Staff. Autumn.

30100. Advanced Polish I.

PQ: POLI 20300 or equivalent. Students in this course discuss selected readings (primarily short stories chosen by the instructor) in Polish during the week. The level of work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. All work in Polish. Staff. Autumn.

Literature and Linguistics

29700. Reading and Research Course.

PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Staff. Autumn.

29900. BA Paper.

PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Open only to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature. This course must be taken for a quality grade. Staff. Autumn.

Russian (RUSS)

Language

10100. First-Year Russian I.

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. V. Ivleva. Autumn.

10400. Russian through Pushkin I.

Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300. This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin's shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Staff. Autumn.

20100. Second-Year Russian I.

PQ: RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor. This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Staff. Autumn.

20400. Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year I.

PQ: RUSS 10600. This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Staff. Autumn.

20702. Third-Year Russian through Culture I.

PQ: RUSS 20300 (two years of Russian) or equivalent. This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week. V. Pichugin. Autumn.

21002. Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story I.

PQ: Three years of Russian or equivalent. This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week. V. Ivleva. Autumn.

21302. Advanced Russian through Media I.

PQ: RUSS 21200 or consent of instructor. This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week. V. Pichugin. Autumn.

21600. Russian for Heritage Learners.

PQ: Ability to speak Russian fluently required; formal training in Russian not required. This course examines the major aspects of Russian grammar and stylistics essential for heritage learners. Students engage in close readings and discussions of short stories by classic and contemporary Russian authors (e.g., Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Platonov, Bulgakov, Erofeev, Tolstaya), with special emphasis on their linguistic and stylistic differences. All work in Russian. Staff. Autumn.

Literature and Linguistics

25501/35501. Word, Image, Ritual: Early Russian Literature in Its Historical and Cultural Context.

This course examines elements of Pre-Modern Russian material culture through a selection of Old Russian (early East Slavic) texts. Sample topics will include iconography and fresco painting in medieval Rus', church architecture, chronicles, lives of saints, and Novgorodian birch bark documents, explored in their historical and social contexts. All readings are in English. Y. Gorbachov. Autumn.

27100/37100. Gogol.

One of the most enigmatic authors in Russian literature, Nikolai Gogol (1809-1852) was hailed in his own lifetime as the leading prose writer of his generation, a brilliant comic writer, and the innovator of the new school of Russian Naturalism/Realism. Since his death, Gogol has been the subject of ever-greater critical controversy. Reading representative works from each period of Gogol's career, including his Petersburg Tales and Dead Souls, we will trace the author's creative development and consider it in relation to his biography and early 19th-century Russian literary and social history. We will work together to identify the characteristic features of Gogol's narrative technique as well as the challenges to interpretation his texts pose. No knowledge of Russian required. M. Sternstein. Autumn.

28000/38000. The Russian Revolution as an Aesthetic Fact.

In the early 20th century Russia went through three revolutions, starting with the so-called "Bloody Sunday" of 1905 and ending with Lenin's Bolsheviks coming to power in October, 1917. Revolution, however, is a word whose meaning is not restricted to the sphere of politics alone. At the time and in the wake of Russia's political upheavals many among Russian intelligentsia not only attempted to come to grips with revolution, but also imported the concept into art. The aim of this course is to trace how it happened that, around one hundred years ago, the word "revolution" became a major aesthetic term, a universal metaphor relevant not only to politicians, but also in the philosophical, religious, psychological and aesthetic spheres. We will focus on art, on Russian literature, Russian stage and Russian film, discussing such major works as Blok's poem "Twelve," Eisenstein's film "October" and a number of other, less famous names and works. They will help us trace the society's response to aesthetic, mostly performative, side of the Revolution. No knowledge of Russian required. D. Khitrova. Autumn.

South Slavic

Literature and Linguistics

27200/37200. Returning the Gaze: The Balkans and Western Europe. (=CMLT 23201, CMLT 33201, NEHC 20885, NEHC 30885)

This course investigates the complex relationship between South East European self-representations and the imagined Western "gaze" for whose benefit the nations stage their quest for identity and their aspirations for recognition. We also think about differing models of masculinity, the figure of the gypsy as a metaphor for the national self in relation to the West, and the myths Balkans tell about themselves. We conclude by considering the role that the imperative to belong to Western Europe played in the Yugoslav wars of succession. Some possible texts/films are Ivo Andric, Bosnian Chronicle; Aleko Konstantinov, Baj Ganyo; Emir Kusturica, Underground; and Milcho Manchevski, Before the Rain. A. Ilieva. Autumn.

29700. Reading and Research Course.

PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Staff. Autumn.