Winter 2010 Courses

Slavic Department Listings

Jump to current courses in: BCSN CZEC EEUR SLAV POLI RUSS SOSL

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCSN)

Language

10200/31100. Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. Knowledge of a Slavic language and background in linguistics not required. The major objective of the course is to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time. N. Petkovic. Winter.

20200/32100. Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. PQ: BCSN 20100 or consent of instructor. The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time. N. Petkovic. Winter.

29700. Reading and Research Course. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

30200. Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II. PQ: BCSN 30100 or consent of instructor. This course is tailored to the needs of the students enrolled, depending on their concentration in the field. It enhances language acquisition with continuous reading and translation of essays, newspaper articles, literary excerpts, letters and other selected writings. Vocabulary building is emphasized by the systematic study of nominal and verbal roots, prefixes and suffixes, and word formation thereafter. Discussion follows each completed reading with a written composition assigned in relation to the topic. N. Petkovic. Winter.

Czech (CZEC)

Language

10200. Elementary Czech II. This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research. Winter.

20200. Second-Year Czech II. PQ: CZEC 20100 or consent of instructor. The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students. Winter.

Literature and Linguistics

29700. Reading and Research Course. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900. BA Paper. PQ: Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

East European (EEUR)

Literature and Linguistics

21200/31200. Elementary Modern Armenian II. (=ARME 10102) This three-quarter sequence utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids to enable students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet, and basic grammatical structures, as well as to achieve a reasonable level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). Considerable amounts of historical/political and social/cultural issues about Armenia are built into this sequence to prepare students who intend to conduct research in Armenian studies or to pursue work in Armenia. H. Haroutunian. Winter.

General Slavic (SLAV)

Literature and Linguistics

20400/30400. Contemporary Central Asia. (=HIST 25600/35600, NEHC 20762/30762) This survey course covers the period from approximately 1700 AD to the present. We emphasize the genesis of the modern nations of Central Eurasia, including the post-Soviet republics and adjacent areas in the periphery of Central Eurasia. K. Arik. Winter.

21100/31100. Comparative Slavic Morphology.  This course deals with the evolution of Slavic inflection from Proto-Indo-European. Less time is devoted to developments in individual Slavic languages. PQ: SLAV 20100/30100 and knowledge of Old Church Slavic. Y. Gorbachov. Winter, 2010.

21700/31700. Human Being, Language, and Mind: An Introduction to Cognitive Linguistics. (=LING 26700/36700) This course explores the relatively new framework of cognitive linguistics. Topics include metaphor and metonymy, prototypes, polysemy, categorization and conceptualization, blends, constructions, the embodiment of meaning, construal, grammaticalization, and language pedagogy. Readings are drawn from the works of Croft, Janda, Fillmore, Lakoff and Johnson, Langacker, Sweetser, Talmy, Turner, Wierzbicka, and others. Y. Gorbachov. Winter.

22000/32000. Old Church Slavonic. (=LGLN 25100/35100) PQ: Knowledge of another Slavic language or good knowledge of one or two other old Indo-European languages required; SLAV 20100/30100 recommended. This course introduces the language of the oldest Slavic texts. It begins with a brief historical overview of the relationship of Old Church Slavonic to Common Slavic and the other Slavic languages. This is followed by a short outline of Old Church Slavonic inflectional morphology. The remainder of the course is spent in the reading and grammatical analysis of original texts. Texts in Cyrillic or Cyrillic transcription of the original Glagolitic. V. Friedman. Winter.

23000/33000. Language, Power, and Identity in Southeastern Europe: A Linguistics View of the Balkan Crisis. (=ANTH 27400/37400, HUMA 27400, LING 27200/37200) This course familiarizes students with the linguistic histories and structures that have served as bases for the formation of modern Balkan ethnic identities and that are being manipulated to shape current and future events. This course is informed by the instructor’s thirty years of linguistic research in the Balkans, as well as experience as an adviser for the United Nations Protection Forces in Former Yugoslavia and as a consultant to the Council on Foreign Relations, the International Crisis Group, and other organizations. Course content may vary in response to current events. V. Friedman. Winter.

29700. Reading and Research Course. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900. BA Paper. PQ: Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

Polish (POLI)

Language

10200. Elementary Polish II. This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g., communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students’ native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure. J. Kurowska-Mlynarczyk. Winter.

20200. Second-Year Polish II. PQ: POLI 20100 or equivalent. This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student’s level of preparation. J. Kurowska-Mlynarczyk. Winter.

30200. Advanced Polish II. PQ: POLI 30100 or equivalent. Students in this course discuss selected readings (primarily short stories chosen by the instructor) in Polish during the week. The level of work is adjusted to each student’s level of preparation. All work in Polish. J. Kurowska-Mlynarczyk. Winter.

Literature and Linguistics

25301/35301. Gombrowicz: The Writer as Philosopher. (=FNDL 26903) The spell exercised by Witold Gombrowicz over his readers has to do, at least in part, with the brilliant linguistic enactment of philosophical discourse in his fiction. Through a reading of his novel Ferdydurke, we analyze how he moves away from traditional philosophical approaches to (inter)subjectivity, order, and chaos to articulate his own creative dissolutions. Gombrowicz’s A Guide to Philosophy in Six Hours and Fifteen Minutes serves as the ironic and provoking introduction to the course and, for those uninitiated, to philosophy. B. Shallcross. Winter.

29700. Reading and Research Course. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.Slavic Languages and Literatures (hcd) 561

29900. BA Paper. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Open only to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature. This course must be taken for a quality grade. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

Russian (RUSS)

Language

10200. First-Year Russian II. This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Winter. \

10500. Russian through Pushkin II. Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300. This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin’s shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Winter.

20200. Second-Year Russian II. PQ: RUSS 20100 or consent of instructor. This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Winter.

20500. Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year II. PQ: RUSS 20400. This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Winter.

20802. Third-Year Russian through Culture II. PQ: RUSS 20702 (two years of Russian) or equivalent. This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week. V. Pichugin. Winter.

21102. Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story II. PQ: Three years of Russian or equivalent. This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Winter.

21402. Advanced Russian through Media II. PQ: RUSS 21302 or consent of instructor. This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week. V. Pichugin. Winter.

Literature and Linguistics

25100-25200. Introduction to Russian Civilization I, II. (=HIST 13900-14000, SOSC 24000-24100) Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This two-quarter, interdisciplinary course studies geography, history, literature, economics, law, fine arts, religion, sociology, and agriculture, among other fields, to see how the civilization of Russia has developed and functioned since the ninth century. The first quarter covers the period up to 1801; the second, since 1801. The course has a common lecture by a specialist in the field, usually on a topic about which little is written in English. Two weekly seminar meetings are devoted to discussion of the readings, which integrate the materials from a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives. The course attempts to inculcate an understanding of the separate elements of Russian civilization. Emphasis is placed on discovering indigenous elements of Russian civilization and how they have reacted to the pressures and impact of other civilizations, particularly Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western. The course also considers problems of the social sciences, such as the way in which the state has dominated society, stratification, patterns of legitimization of the social order, symbols of collective social and cultural identity, the degrees of pluralism in society, and the autonomy an individual has vis-à-vis the social order. Also examined are such problems as the role of the center in directing the periphery and its cultural, political, and economic order; the mechanisms of control over the flow of resources and the social surplus; and processes of innovation and modernization. This course is offered in alternate years. J. Fein. Autumn, Winter.

25600/35600. Realism in Russia. (=HUMA 24100, ISHU 23100/33100) From the 1830s to the 1890s, most Russian prose writers and playwrights were either engaged in the European-wide cultural movement known as “realistic school,” which set for itself the task of engaging with social processes from the standpoint of political ideologies. The ultimate goal of this course is to distill more precise meanings of “realism,” “critical realism,” and “naturalism” in nineteenth-century Russian through analysis of works by Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Aleksandr Ostrovsky, Goncharov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, and Kuprin. Texts in English and the original. Optional Russian-intensive section offered. Winter.

29100/39100 Staging Feelings: Russian Lyrical Poetry in the first half of the 19th century.
This course will offer a close reading of the most influential Russian lyrical poets of the first half of the 19th century, from Vassily Zhukovsky to Fedor Tiutchev. We will read poems in Russian and use Russian to discuss them. Along with the analysis of literary techniques and the development of lyrical idiom, students will be introduced to the social and cultural functions of lyrical poetry in the 19th century, from religious meditation to hidden request of erotic intimacy. The lyrical pieces will be examined against the background of different social practices of its authors and readers, as we know them from contemporary sources (diaries, letters, etc.) as well as their relationship to other forms of literature and art (theater, music, visual arts). We will also explore European literary influences on Russian poetry and their function in framework of the Russian tradition. D. Khitrova. Winter, 2010.

29700. Reading and Research Course. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900. BA Paper. PQ: Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

South Slavic (SOSL)

Literature and Linguistics

26800/36800. Balkan Folklore. This course is an overview of Balkan folklore from ethnographic, anthropological, historical/political, and performative perspectives. We become acquainted with folk tales, lyric and epic songs, music, and dance. The work of Milman Parry and Albert Lord, who developed their theory of oral composition through work among epic singers in the Balkans, help us understand folk tradition as a dynamic process. We also consider the function of different folklore genres in the imagining and maintenance of community and the socialization of the individual. We also experience this living tradition first hand through our visit to the classes and rehearsals of the Chicago-based ensemble “Balkanske igre.” A. Ilieva. Winter, 2010.

27610/37610. Gender in the Balkans through Literature and Film. (=CMLT 23901/33901, GNDR 27702/37700, ISHU 27610) This introductory course examines the poetics of femininity and masculinity in some of the best works of the Balkan region. We contemplate how the experiences of masculinity and femininity are constituted and the issues of socialization related to these modes of being. Topics include the traditional family model, the challenges of modernization and urbanization, the socialist paradigm, and the post-socialist changes. Finally, we consider the relation between gender and nation, especially in the context of the dissolution of Yugoslavia. All work in English. A. Ilieva. Winter, 2010.

29700. Reading and Research Course. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900. BA Paper. PQ: Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade. Autumn, Winter, Spring