Spring 2012 Courses

Slavic Department Listings

Jump to current courses in: BCSN CZEC EEUR SLAV POLI RUSS SOSL

Bosnian/Croation/Serbian (BCSN)

Language

10100-10200-10300/31000-31100-31200. Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I, II, III. Knowledge of a Slavic language and background in linguistics not required. The major objective of the course is to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time. N. Petkovic. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

20100-20200-20300/32000-32100-32200. Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I, II, III. PQ: BCSN 10300 or consent of instructor. The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time. N. Petkovic. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29700. Reading and Research Course. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

30100-30200-30300. Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I, II, III. PQ: BCSN 20300 or consent of instructor. This course is tailored to the needs of the students enrolled, depending on their concentration in the field. It enhances language acquisition with continuous reading and translation of essays, newspaper articles, literary excerpts, letters and other selected writings. Vocabulary building is emphasized by the systematic study of nominal and verbal roots, prefixes and suffixes, and word formation thereafter. Discussion follows each completed reading with a written composition assigned in relation to the topic. N. Petkovic. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

Czech (CZEC)

Language

10100-10200-10300. Elementary Czech I, II, III. This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

20100-20200-20300. Second-Year Czech I, II, III. PQ: CZEC 10300 or consent of instructor. The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

Literature and Linguistics

29700. Reading and Research Course. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900. BA Paper. PQ: Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

East European (EEUR)

Literature and Linguistics

21100-21200-21300/31100-31200-31300. Elementary Modern Armenian I, II, III. (=ARME 10101-10102-10103) This three-quarter sequence utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids to enable students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet, and basic grammatical structures, as well as to achieve a reasonable level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). Considerable amounts of historical/political and social/cultural issues about Armenia are built into this sequence to prepare students who intend to conduct research in Armenian studies or to pursue work in Armenia. H. Haroutunian. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

The Unbelievable Came True: Magical realism in the Other Europe. Malynne Sternstein, A. Ilieva. Spring.

General Slavic (SLAV)

Literature and Linguistics

25900/35900. Word and Image: Reassessing Interdisciplinarity. This course discusses the recent revisions of the verbal-visual interrelationship in the works of Ernst van Alphen, Mieke Bal, W.J.T. Mitchell and others. B. Shallcross. Spring.

29700. Reading and Research Course. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900. BA Paper. PQ: Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

Polish (POLI)

Language

10100-10200-10300. Elementary Polish I, II, III. This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g., communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

20100-20200-20300. Second-Year Polish I, II, III. PQ: POLI 10300 or equivalent. This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

30100-30200-30300. Advanced Polish I, II, III. PQ: POLI 20300 or equivalent. Students in this course discuss selected readings (primarily short stories chosen by the instructor) in Polish during the week. The level of work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. All work in Polish. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

Literature and Linguistics

22300. Poland after Communism.The last two decades after the fall of Communism brought about significant changes in all areas of life in Poland. The course focuses on several aspects of the transformation such as everyday life under capitalism; the role of religion and art in society; nationalism, and a revision of the 20th century Polish history. The source materials entail feature and documentary films and visual arts. Dr. Tomasz Łysak. Spring 2012.

29700. Reading and Research Course. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900. BA Paper. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Open only to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature. This course must be taken for a quality grade. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

Russian (RUSS)

Language

10100-10200-10300. First-Year Russian I, II, III. This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

10400-10500-10600. Russian through Pushkin I, II, III. Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300. This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin's shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

20100-20200-20300. Second-Year Russian I, II, III. PQ: RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor. This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

20400-20500-20600. Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year I, II, III. PQ: RUSS 10600. This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

20702-20802-20902. Third-Year Russian through Culture I, II, III. PQ: RUSS 20300 (two years of Russian) or equivalent. This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week. V. Pichugin. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

21002-21102-21202. Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story I, II, III. PQ: Three years of Russian or equivalent. This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

21302-21402-21502. Advanced Russian through Media I, II, III. PQ: RUSS 21200 or consent of instructor. This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week. V. Pichugin. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

Literature and Linguistics

25700/35700. Russian Literature from Modernism to Post-Modernism. Given the importance of the written word in Russian culture, it is no surprise that writers were full-blooded participants in Russia's tumultuous recent history, which has lurched from war to war, and from revolution to revolution. The change of political regimes has only been outpaced by the change of aesthetic regimes, from realism to symbolism, and then from socialist realism to post-modernism. We sample the major writers, texts, and literary doctrines, paying close attention to the way they responded and contributed to historical events. This course counts as the third part of the survey of Russian literature. Texts in English. W. Nickell. Spring.

29700. Reading and Research Course. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900. BA Paper. PQ: Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

South Slavic

Literature and Linguistics

26610/36610. The Brighter Side of the Balkans: Humor and Satire in Balkan Literature. A. Ilieva., V. Friedman. Spring.

27300/37300. The Burden of History: A Nation and Its Lost Paradise. (=CMLT 23401/33401, NEHC 20573/30573) This course begins by defining the nation both historically and conceptually, with attention to Romantic nationalism and its flourishing in Southeastern Europe. We then look at the narrative of original wholeness, loss, and redemption through which Balkan countries retell their Ottoman past. With the help of Freud's analysis of masochistic desire and Žižek's theory of the subject as constituted by trauma, we contemplate the national fixation on the trauma of loss and the dynamic between victimhood and sublimity. The figure of the Janissary highlights the significance of the other in the definition of the self. Some possible texts are Petar Njegoš's Mountain Wreath; Ismail Kadare's The Castle; and Anton Donchev's Time of Parting. A. Ilieva. Spring.

27400/37400. Magic Realist and Fantastic Writings from the Balkans. (=CMLT 22201/32201) In this course, we ask whether there is such a thing as a "Balkan" type of magic realism and think about the differences between the genres of magic realism and the fantastic, while reading some of the most interesting writing to have come out of the Balkans. We also look at the similarities of the works from different countries (e.g., lyricism of expression, eroticism, nostalgia) and argue for and against considering such similarities constitutive of an overall Balkan sensibility. A. Ilieva. Spring.

29700. Reading and Research Course. PQ: Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

29900. BA Paper. PQ: Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade. Autumn, Winter, Spring.