Courses 2006-2007

Slavic Department Listings

 

 

Languages

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian

 


BCSN 10100-10200-10300 ELEMENTARY BOSNIAN/CROATIAN/SERBIAN
No knowledge of any Slavic language or background in linguistics is necessary. The course is designed for both undergraduate and graduate students with a wide range of interests. The major objective of the course is to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Serbian/Croatian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course will be complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans, with an emphasis on viewing movies and other audio-video materials during additional evening hours.
N. Petković-Djordjević

BCSN 20100-20200-20300 INTERMEDIATE BOSNIAN/CROATIAN/SERBIAN
Knowledge of basic Serbian/Croatian is necessary. The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of the Serbian/Croatian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology and syntax are emphasized. The course includes movies and other audio-visual materials to be shown during additional evening hours.
PREREQUISITES: BCSN 10300 or consent of instructor.
N. Petković-Djordjević

BCSN 20400-20500-20600 ADVANCED BOSNIAN/CROATIAN/SERBIAN
This course is tailored to the needs of students enrolled depending on their concentration in the field. It enhances language acquisition with continuous reading and translation of essays, newspaper articles, literary excerpts, letters and other selected writings. Vocabulary building is emphasized by the systematic study of nominal and verbal roots, prefixes and suffixes, and word formation thereafter. Discussion follows each completed reading with a written composition assigned in relation to the topic.
PREREQUISITES: BCSN 20300 or consent of instructor.
N. Petković-Djordjević


 

Bulgarian

 


BULG 20100-20200-20300/30100-30200-30300 INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY BULGARIAN I, II, III
A thorough introduction to the fundamentals of Bulgarian, covering all major grammatical structures and encompassing all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The course assumes no previous knowledge of Russian or any other Slavic language, but does assume high motivation and dedication to intensive work. Multi-media approach, with an initial emphasis on oral mastery of the language, furnishes a solid basis for the development of reading and writing skills during the winter and spring quarters. Language instruction is supplemented by readings of classic Bulgarian poetic and prose texts. After the completion of the course, students should be able to engage in everyday conversation with native speakers, and read straightforward texts, both fiction and non-fiction, with relative ease.
Autumn, Winter, Spring.
D. Hristova



 

Czech/Slovak

 


CZEC 10100-10200-10300 ELEMENTARY CZECH
An introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students will gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research.
Christian Hilchey.


CZEC 20100-20200-20300 SECOND-YEAR CZECH
The main emphasis is on giving students proficiency in reading Czech in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.
PREREQUISITES: CZEC 10300 or consent of instructor.
Esther Peters


 

Russian



RUSS 10100(A)-10200(W)-10300(S) FIRST-YEAR RUSSIAN I, II, III
This course introduces basic grammar and practice in the elements of spoken and written modern Russian. All four aspects of language skill (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are included. The course is designed to introduce students to using Russian both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research. Conversation practice is held twice a week. Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300.
Petia Alexieva, Erik Houle, Maria Yakubovich

RUSS 10400(A)-10500(W)-10600(S) RUSSIAN THROUGH PUSHKIN: FIRST YEAR I, II, III.
An experimental linguistic and literary approach to first-year Russian in which classic Russian poetic texts, such as Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman, are used to teach firstyear grammar. Oral and reading skills are equally emphasized. Activization drills meet twice a week.
Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300.
Steven Clancy, Kinga Maciejewska

RUSS 20100(A)-20200(W)-20300(S) SECOND-YEAR RUSSIAN I, II, III
This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.
PREREQUISITES: RUSS 10300 or RUSS 10600 or consent of instructor.
Meng Li, Farida Tcherkassova

RUSS 20400(A)-20500(W)-20600(S) RUSSIAN THROUGH LITERARY READINGS: SECOND YEAR I, II, III
This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.
PREREQUISITES: RUSS 10600 or RUSS 10300.
Junghee Min

RUSS 20702(A)-20802(W)-20902(S). THIRD-YEAR RUSSIAN THROUGH CULTURE I, II, III
This course is designed for third-year students of Russian. It covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian TV news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian with some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.
PREREQUISITES: RUSS 20300 or RUSS 20600 (two years of Russian) or equivalent.
V. Pichugin

RUSS 21002(A)-21102(W)-21202(S). FOURTH-YEAR RUSSIAN THROUGH SHORT STORY I, II, III
The course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.
PREREQUISITES: Three years of Russian or equivalent.
Andrew Dombrowski

RUSS 21302-21402-21502. ADVANCED RUSSIAN THROUGH MEDIA I, II, III
The course is designed for fifth-year students of Russian. It covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and TV news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.
PREREQUISITES: RUSS 21200 or consent of instructor.
V. Pichugin

RUSS 21600(A). RUSSIAN FOR HERITAGE LEARNERS
This course examines the major aspects of Russian grammar and stylistics essential for heritage learners. Students engage in close readings and discussions of short stories by classic and contemporary Russian authors (e.g., Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Platonov, Bulgakov, Erofeev, Tolstaya), with special emphasis on their linguistic and stylistic differences. All work in Russian.
Sasha Spektor
Autumn.

Polish

 


POLI 10100(A)-10200(W)-10300(S) ELEMENTARY POLISH I, II, III
This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, and familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching, such as communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills, as well as multi-leveled target-language exposure.
J. K.-Mlynarczyk

POLI 20100(A)-20200(W)-20300(S) SECOND-YEAR POLISH I, II, III
The curriculum includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, students' independent reading is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.
PREREQUISITES: POLI 10300 or equivalent.
J. K.-Mlynarczyk

POLI 20400(A)-20500(W)-20600(S) THIRD-YEAR POLISH I, II, III
The curriculum includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, students’ independent reading is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student’s level of preparation.
J. K.-Mlynarczyk


 

Reading Courses

 

SLAV 22000/32000. Old Church Slavonic. (=LGLN 25100/35100)
PQ: Knowledge of another Slavic language or good knowledge of one or two other old Indo-European languages required; SLAV 20100/30100 recommended.
This course introduces the language of the oldest Slavic texts. It begins with a brief historical overview of the relationship of Old Church Slavonic to Common Slavic and the other Slavic languages. This is followed by a short outline of Old Church Slavonic inflectional morphology. The remainder of the course is spent in the reading and grammatical analysis of original texts in Cyrillic or Cyrillic transcription of the original Glagolitic.
V. Friedman.
Winter.


 

Eastern European Languages

 

21100-21200-21300/31100-31200-31300. Elementary Modern Armenian I, II, III. (=ARME 10101-10102-10103)
For course description, see Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations (Armenian).
H. Haroutunian.
Autumn, Winter, Spring.


23400/33400. Introduction to the Musical Folklore of Central Asia. (=ANTH 25905, MUSI 23503/33503, NEHC 20765/30765)
For course description, see Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations (Near Eastern History and Civilization).
K. Arik.
Spring, 2007.

 

Literature


Czech & Slovak literature

 

CZEC 24500/34500. Jaroslav Hasek’s The Good Soldier Svejk.
One of the greatest, most iconoclastic, and anarchically comedic novels to emerge from the Great War, The Adventures of the Good Soldier Svejk has been the inspiration for operettas, novels like Catch 22, and subversives everywhere. The course reads the novel by the hard-drinking Jaroslav Hasek in as anabastic a way as possible, while situating it in the prevailing politics of absurdity and the hangover of kakania.
M. Sternstein.
Autumn, 2006.

 

CZEC 26700/36700. Czech New Wave Cinema. (=CMST 24401/34401)
The insurgent film movement known as the Czech New Wave spawned such directors as the internationally acclaimed Milos Forman (The Fireman’s Ball, Loves of a Blonde), Jiri Menzel (Closely Watched Trains), Jan Kadar (The Shop on Main Street), and Vera Chytilova (Daisies), and the lesser known but nationally inspirational Evald Schorm, Jarmir Jires, Odlrich Lipsky, and Jan Nemec. The serendipitous life of the Czech New Wave is as much a subject of the course’s inquiry as close technical and semantic research of the films themselves.
M. Sternstein.
Spring, 2007.

CZEC 27701/37701. Franz Kafka: The Diaries. (=GRMN 27900/37900, ISHU 29005).
The course's design is a close reading of Kafka's Diaries and notebooks. Those with a reading knowledge or better of German and/or Czech will have priority.
M. Sternstein,
Winter 2007
.


Russian literature

 

RUSS 23900. Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita. (=FNDL 25300, ISHU 24901)
Popular as Nabokov’s “all-American” novel is, it is rarely discussed beyond its psycho-sexual profile. This intensive text-centered and discussion-based course attempts to supersede the univocal obsession with the novel’s pedophiliac plot as such by concerning itself above all with the novel’s language: language as failure, as mania, and as conjuration.
M. Sternstein.
Winter, 2007.


RUSS 24300. The Brothers Karamazov. (=FNDL 26201, HUMA 23300)
Required of new Fundamentals majors; open to others with consent of instructor.
For course description, see Fundamentals.
S. Meredith.
Winter, 2007.

RUSS 25100-25200. Introduction to Russian Civilization I, II. (=HIST 13900-14000, SOSC 24000-24100)
Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
For course description, see Social Sciences. This course is offered in alternate years.
R. Hellie.
Autumn, Winter.


RUSS 25500/35500. Introduction to Russian Literature I: Beginnings to 1850. (=HUMA 22600, ISHU 22600/32600)
This is a survey of major writers and works from the mysterious Igor Tale to the middle of the nineteenth century. Major figures covered are Derzhavin, Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, and Turgenev. Texts in English.
Farida Tcherkassova
Autumn.


RUSS 25600/35600. Introduction to Russian Literature II: 1850 to 1900 (=HUMA 24000, ISHU 22400/32400)
This is a survey covering the second half of the nineteenth century. Major figures studied are Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Leskov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, and Chekhov. Representative works are read for their literary value and against their historical, cultural, and intellectual background. Texts in English.
Alina Wyman.
Winter.


RUSS 25700/35700. Introduction to Russian Literature III: Twentieth-Century Russian Literature. (=HUMA 24100, ISHU 23100/33100)
This is a survey of major writers and works of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Special attention is paid to the evolution of modernism and post-modernism in Russia. Specific course topics include Symbolism, the avant-garde of the 1920s, socialist realism, émigré literature, and Russian post-modernism. Writers include Bely, Nabokov, Platonov, Solzhenitsyn and Pelevin. Texts in English.
Gabrielle Cavagnaro.
Spring.


RUSS 25900/35900. History and the Russian Novel. (=HIST 23601/33601, SOSC 29000)
For course description, see History.
R. Hellie.
Autumn.


RUSS 26701/36701. The Soviet Imaginary.
Though distinctive in innumerable respects, Soviet culture may have been most unique precisely in the very relationship it fostered between different discourses or registers. We will investigate specific texts in various media from the 1920s to the 1970s to illumine both the underlying Soviet imaginary and its evolution from modernism through Stalinism and the Thaw. Dominant cultural themes will be traced via works by Aleksandr Bogdanov, Evgenii Zamiatin, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Marietta Shaginian, Veniamin Kaverin, Dziga Vertov, Aleksandr Dovzhenko, Andrei Platonov, Valentin Rasputin. The ways in which the Soviet imaginary was adopted in other East and Central European countries will be evaluated. Theoretical background will comprise key texts by Sartre, Lacan, Jameson, Castoriadis, Iser and others. Knowledge of a Slavic language required.
R. Bird.
Autumn 2006.

 

RUSS 26702/36702. The Literature of the Fantastic.
This course will include texts by Russian and English authors, including Pushkin, Gogol, Bulgakov, Nabokov, Poe, H.G. Wells, and Oscar Wilde. Theoretical positions will be examined based on texts by Tzevtan Todorov, Jackson, Traill, Lachmann. All texts will be in English.
R. Lachmann.
Winter 2007.

RUSS 27801/37801. How Dostoevsky’s The Idiot Is Made. (=ENGL 28902/48902, CMLT 29300/39300, FNDL 27101, and HUMA 27801)
This course examines the intellectual and aesthetic backgrounds and structure of Dostoevsky's novel The Idiot (1869). We will approach The Idiot in the contexts of both the European and Russian literary traditions, exploring its links to such antecedents as Cervantes' Don Quixote, Dickens' The Pickwick Papers, and Flaubert's Simple Heart, as well as its influence on Dostoevsky's later works, particularly The Demons and The Brothers Karamazov. Discussion and papers are in English. Reading knowledge of Russian, French and/or Spanish is welcome, but not required.
Lina Steiner.
Spring 2007.

RUSS 29001/39001. Poetic Cinema. (=CMLT 29000/39000, CMST 25501/35501, ISHU 29002, RLIT 39000, RLST 28401)
Films are frequently denoted as “poetic” or “lyrical” in a vague sort of way. It has been applied equally to religious cinema and to the experimental avant-garde. Our task is to interrogate this concept and to try to define what it actually is denoting. Films and critical texts are mainly drawn from Soviet and French cinema of the 1920s to the1930s and the 1960s to the 1990s. Directors include Dovzhenko, Renoir, Cocteau, Resnais, Maya Deren, Tarkovsky, Pasolini, Jarman, and Sokurov. In addition to sampling these directors’ own writings, we examine theories of poetic cinema by major critics from the Russian formalists to Andre Bazin and beyond.
R. Bird.
Winter, 2007.


RUSS 29601/39601. Narrative, Image, Thought. (=ISHU 29601, RLIT 39600, RLST 28201, RUSS 29601/39601)
Knowledge of Russian not required. Russian thought has traditionally developed in close relation to literary and visual art. We focus on key moments in this interaction that include: the romantic invention of a dominant aesthetic and ideological framework; Dostoevsky’s intervention in artistic and ideological debates; and key modernist trends, from the re-discovery of the icon and Russian Orthodoxy (Florensky, Kandinsky, Malevich) to the aesthetics of montage in early Soviet culture (Eisenstein, Rodchenko, Shklovsky). Equal attention is paid to narrative practice and visual style, as well as to their relation to key ideas in intellectual history. Discussion encouraged.
R. Bird.
Spring, 2007
.

RUSS 47800. Intertextuality and Memory.
This course will include works by Andrei Bely, Osip Mandelstam, Anna Akhmatova, and Nabokov. Theoretical sources on intertextuality will include Mikhail Bakhtin, Julia Kristeva, Riffaterre, and Lotman.
R. Lachmann.
Winter 2007.



Polish literature

 

POLI 28101/38101. Modern Polish Novel. (=ISHU 28101) In this course, we study the development of the Polish modern novel from its early dependence on the nineteenth-century realistic conventions (Reymont), the modernist employment of language (Berent), and the attempt at forging psychological (Freudian) narrative (Irzykowski). We consider the impact of pragmatism and Bergsonism in Nalkowska’s writings, as well as read Gombrowicz and Witkiewicz’s experimental fiction and attend to the engagement of autobiography, history, and document by Choromanski, Nalkowska, Dabrowska, Kaden, Rembek, and Unilowski, respectively.
B. Shallcross.
Winter, 2007.


POLI 29000/39000. Moments of Happiness. (=FNDL 26902, ISHU 29001) The sudden moment of illumination is a rare and sudden cognitive experience. In its high modernist version it is irrelevant to its cause, while later on it is mediated by diverse phenomena that range from works of art to libido. This course traces the presence of these awakenings in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway. We also refer to several very brief poems and essays by Hugo von Hoffmanstahl, James Joyce, Czeslaw Milosz, Zbigniew Herbert, and Adam Zagajewski.
B. Shallcross.
Autumn, 2006.


POLI 29201/39201. The Traumatic Everyday: The Holocaust in Polish Literature. (=ISHU 29201)
Our investigation of the search for adequate means of representing and conceptualizing the Holocaust ranges from the poetics of absence to testimonial accounts and traumatic memorization. Cinematic, literary, and pictorial representations of the Holocaust run from Borowski’s real life experience in Auschwitz through Grynberg’s sense of mission as a survivor to Polanski’s filmic vision seemingly unrelated to his own survival. We reconstruct the realities of the Holocaust against the post-Holocaust mechanics of idealization and aesthetization, trace the emergence of the new approach to the “other,” and read recent theories (Agamben, Rothberg). In this course, the Polish perspective is juxtaposed to that of Polish Jewry.
B. Shallcross.
Autumn, 2006.


 

South Slavic literature

RUSS 26400/36400. Introduction to Twentieth Century South Slavic Literature
In this course we will survey some of the major South Slavic writers from the twentieth and twenty-first century. We will examine how their works grapple with the legacy of the Austro-Hungarian and the Ottoman Empires, with the wars, with socialism and its demise, as well as simply with the modern experience of being. We will compare the conceptual and mythic categories through which these works make sense of the world and argue for and against considering such categories constitutive of an overall South Slavic sensibility.
Some possible texts, not in the same order:
Ivo Andrić, “The Damned Yard” and other short pieces
Miroslav Klreža, “The Devil’s Island” and other short pieces
Meša Selimović, “The Fortress”
Danilo Kiš, “A Tomb for Boris Davidovich”
David Albahari, “Bait” or “Words are Something Else”
Igor Štiks, “Castle in Romagna”
Iordan Iovkov, “Evenings in the Antimov Inn”
Iordan Radichkov, “Hot Noon”
Georgi Gospodinov, “A Natural Novel”
Zhivko Cingo “Big Water”
Goce Smilevski, "Conversation with Spinoza"
Drago Jančar “Mocking Desire”
Aleš Debeljak, “The City and the Child”
Angelina Ilieva.
Fall, 2006.

SOSL 26500/36500. Literature of the Balkan non-Slavs in the Twentieth Century - Albania, Romania, Greece and Turkey.
In this course, we will examine the works of major writers from Albania, Rumania, Greece, and Turkey from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. We will examine how their works grapple with the issues of national identity and their countries’ place in the Balkans and in Europe, with the legacies of the Austro-Hungarian and the Ottoman Empires, with socialism and its demise, with emigration, as well as simply with the modern experience of being. We will compare the conceptual and mythic categories through which these works make sense of the world and argue for and against considering such categories constitutive of an overall Balkan sensibility. The readings will include works by Ismail Kadare, Eqrem Basha, Mimoza Ahmeti, Lindita Arapi (Albania), Ion Luca Caragiale, Norman Manea, Daniela Crasnaru (Rumania),Latife Tekin, and 2006 Nobel Prize laureate Orhan Pamuk (Turkey), Nikos Katzankakis, Cóstas Taktsís (Greece).
A. Ilieva,
Winter 2007.

RUSS 27200/37200. Returning the Gaze – The Balkans and Western Europe.
The first of a two-quarter sequence entitled The Other within the Self: Identity in Balkan Literature and Film that will examine discursive practices in a number of literary and cinematic works from the South East corner of Europe through which identities in the region become defined by two distinct others: the “barbaric” Ottoman and the “civilized” Western European, this course will investigate the complex relationship between South East European self-representations and the imagined Western “gaze” for whose benefit the nations stage their quest for identity and their aspirations for recognition. We will focus on the problems of Orientalism, Balkanism and nesting orientalisms, as well as on self-mythologization and self-exoticization in works such as Miroslav Krleža’s The Return of Philip Latinovich, AlekoKonstantinov’s Baj Ganjo,and Nikos Kazantzakis’ Zorbas the Greek. We will also think about differing models of masculinity, and of the figure of the gypsy as a metaphor for the national self in relation to the West. The course will conclude by considering the role that the imperative to belong to Western Europe played in the Yugoslavian wars of succession.
Some possible titles: Krleza, The Return of Philip Latinovich (Croatia), A. Konstantinov, Baj Ganio (Bulgaria), Ion Luca Caragiale, The Lost Letter (Rumania), Nikos Kazandzakis, Zorba the Greek (Greece), Viktor Paskov, Germany: Dirty Tale (Bulgaria), Orhan Pamuk, Snow (Turkey)
Films: Kusturica, Underground and Time of the Gypsies, Sijan, Who’s Singing Out There (Bosnia, Serbia); Jasmin Dizdar, Beautiful People (Yugoslavia, UK), Goritzas, Balkanisateur (Greece).
Angelina Ilieva.
Fall, 2006.

SOSL 27300/37300. The Burden of History: The Nation and Its Lost Paradise.
In Part Two we will look at the narrative of loss and redemption through which Balkan countries retell the Ottoman past. With the help of Freud’s analysis of masochistic desire and Žižek’s theory of the subject as constituted by trauma, we will contemplate the national fixation on the trauma of loss and the dynamic between victimhood and sublimity. The figure of the Janissary will highlight the significance of the other in the definition of the self. Some possible texts are Petar Njegoš’ Mountain Wreath, Ismail Kadare’s The Castle, and Anton Donchev’s Time of Parting.
A. Ilieva,
Winter 2007.


Eastern European literature


SLAV 21800/31800. The Manifesto, Revolution and Modernity. (=CMLT 22000/32000, ISHU 21801)
As a genre the manifesto provides a unique opportunity for studying the political and aesthetic movements of modernity. It thrives on a culture of crisis by articulating demands, galvanizing public opinion, and dividing the body politic. This class will study the politics, poetics, and geography of the manifesto form between 1870 and 1930. Readings will include symbolist, futurist, dada, and surrealist manifestoes. Additional texts by Karl Marx, Walter Benjamin, Carl Schmitt, Leon Trotsky, Hugo Ball, Andre Breton, Kazimir Malevich, Wyndham Lewis, Sergei Eisenstein, Sergei Tretiakov.
R. Borislavov.
Winter 2007.


Russian linguistics


RUSS 21800/31800. Russian Historical Syntax.
The course will consider the major syntactic developments in the history of Russian language. We will first examine the defining syntactic structures of Old East Slavic. Next we will look at the three mechanisms of syntactic change and determine the role they played in the different Russian diachronic processes. We will pay a particular attention to changes in the secondary predication, the use of the infinitive, and the use of prepositional cases. Finally, we will address the question of word order and pro-“insert” as well as the development of subordinate clauses, subordinators, and complex syntactic structures.
S. Turner.
Winter, 2007.


RUSS 23001/33001. Structure of Russian Syntax.
Topics to be covered in this course include agreement, case usage and word order in Contemporary Standard Russian. Major syntactic features of modern colloquial Russian are also examined.
S. Turner.
Spring, 2007.


Slavic linguistics


SLAV 20100/30100. Introduction to Slavic Linguistics.
The main goal of this course is to familiarize students with the essential facts of the Slavic linguistic history and with the most characteristic features of the modern Slavic languages. In order to understand the development of Proto-Slavic into the existing Slavic languages and dialects, we focus on a set of basic phenomena. The course is specifically concerned with making students aware of factors that led to the breakup of the Slavic unity and the emergence of the individual languages. Drawing on the historical development, we touch upon such salient typological characteristics of the modern languages such as the rich set of morphophonemic alternations, aspect, free word order, and agreement.
D. Hristova.
Autumn.


SLAV 32200. Linguistic Analysis of Old Slavic Texts.
This course is devoted to East Slavic writing before 1800. It has three main aims: to help students develop a sound reading knowledge of Early East Slavic (Old Russian); to acquaint them with important texts of the pre-modern period; and to foster an appreciation of the cultural context in which the texts were written.
The first half of the course gives a broad overview of early medieval writing. Readings include extracts from Nestor’s Life of S. Theodosius, the Lay of Prince Igor, and Metropolitan Ilarion’s Sermon on Law and Grace. The passages are chosen to illustrate important aspects of medieval writing such as hagiographic conventions, and to prompt discussion of issues such as the relationship between ecclesiastical and secular culture.
The topics covered in the early weeks of the quarter provide essential background for the second half of the course, in which a number of texts spanning a wider chronological range are read at greater length. The texts are: two accounts of the (lives and) deaths of SS Boris and Gleb, extracts from the Life of S. Stefan of Perm′, the Life of the Archpriest Avvakum, and a small selection of late medieval and early modern povesti.
Developments within the period are discussed on a thematic basis, with particular reference to Lixačev’s work on the representation of man in medieval Russian writing.
Students are encouraged to read the set texts in the original language. However, translations into modern Russian may be consulted, and references to English translations of the most demanding texts will also be given.
S. Turner.
Autumn 2006.


SLAV 24100/34100. Comparative West Slavic Linguistics.
PQ: One year of any West Slavic language or consent of instructor.
This course examines the linguistic history and contemporary dialectology of the West Slavic Languages with an emphasis on Polish, Czech, Slovak, and Upper and Lower Sorbian. Some attention is also given to Kashubian, Slovincian, and Polabian.
S. Clancy.
Autumn 2006.


SLAV 21700/31700. Human Being, Language, and Mind: An Introduction to Cognitive Linguistics. (=LING 26700/36700)
This course explores the relatively new framework of cognitive linguistics. Topics include metaphor and metonymy, prototypes, polysemy, categorization and conceptualization, blends, constructions, the embodiment of meaning, construal, grammaticalization, and language pedagogy. Readings are drawn from the work of Croft, Janda, Fillmore, Lakoff and Johnson, Langacker, Sweetser, Talmy, Turner, Wierzbicka, and others.
S. Clancy.
Winter.


SLAV 23000/33000. Language, Power, and Identity in Southeastern Europe: A Linguistics View of the Balkan Crisis. (=ANTH 27400/37400, HUMA 27400, LING 27200/37200)
This course familiarizes students with the linguistic histories and structures that have served as bases for the formation of modern Balkan ethnic identities and that are being manipulated to shape current and future events. The course is informed by the instructor’s thirty years of linguistic research in the Balkans as well as his experience as an adviser for the United Nations Protection Forces in Former Yugoslavia and as a consultant to the Council on Foreign Relations, the International Crisis Group, and other organizations. Course content may vary in response to ongoing current events.
V. Friedman.
Winter.


POLI 22200/32200. History of Polish.
In this course, we explore the linguistic history of Polish as the main representative of the Lechitic branch of the West Slavic languages. Focus is placed on those phonological and morphosyntactic processes with outcomes that shaped the most characteristic features of Modern Polish tracing them to Proto-Slavic. We weigh the diachronic developments against their synchronic linguistic geography. In addition, we investigate the pronounced influence of Czech language on medieval Polish and its role as linguistic arbiter between Malopolska dialect features and Wielkopolska dialect features in the formation of literary Polish.
D. Hristova.
Winter, 2007.


CZEC 22200/32200. History of Czech.
This course maps out the evolution of Czech from Proto-Slavic to modern Czech. In addition to the basic issues traditionally investigated whenever a Slavic language is studied diachronically, we also explore the strong influence of German on Czech’s grammar and syntax as well as the complicated problem of how the current diglossia came to exist.
D. Hristova.
Spring, 2007.


Eastern European linguistics

 


EEUR 34600(S). STRUCTURE OF LAK Cross-listed with LGLN 26500/36500.
Lak is a Northeast Caucasian language spoken by over 100,000 people, mostly in the central highlands of Daghestan. It is characterized by a four-way series of stop oppositions, phanyngealized vowels, unusually complex declension, a five-way deictic opposition, four noun classes, agreement markers on any part of speech, a complex verbal system, interesting uses of agreement and cliticization to express focus, evidentiality, and other categories, complex case-marking strategies, and much more. This course will give an overview of Lak grammar focusing on the basic structures and interesting phenomena.
PREREQUISITES: Students should be familiar with the basics of linguistics. Knowledge of Russian a plus but not required.
V. Friedman

 

 

 

EEUR 21100-21200-21300/31100-31200-31300. Elementary Modern Armenian I, II, III. (=ARME 10101-10102-10103)
For course description, see Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations (Armenian).
H. Haroutunian.
Autumn, Winter, Spring.

 

 

 

Other


Interdisciplinary studies


POLI 28101/38101. Modern Polish Novel. (=ISHU 28101)
In this course, we study the development of the Polish modern novel from its early dependence on the nineteenth-century realistic conventions (Reymont), the modernist employment of language (Berent), and the attempt at forging psychological (Freudian) narrative (Irzykowski). We consider the impact of pragmatism and Bergsonism in Nalkowska’s writings, as well as read Gombrowicz and Witkiewicz’s experimental fiction and attend to the engagement of autobiography, history, and document by Choromanski, Nalkowska, Dabrowska, Kaden, Rembek, and Unilowski, respectively.
B. Shallcross.
Winter, 2007.


POLI 29000/39000. Moments of Happiness. (=FNDL 26902, ISHU 29001)
The sudden moment of illumination is a rare and sudden cognitive experience. In its high modernist version it is irrelevant to its cause, while later on it is mediated by diverse phenomena that range from works of art to libido. This course traces the presence of these awakenings in Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway. We also refer to several very brief poems and essays by Hugo von Hoffmanstahl, James Joyce, Czeslaw Milosz, Zbigniew Herbert, and Adam Zagajewski.
B. Shallcross.
Autumn, 2006.


POLI 29201/39201. The Traumatic Everyday: The Holocaust in Polish Literature. (=ISHU 29201)
Our investigation of the search for adequate means of representing and conceptualizing the Holocaust ranges from the poetics of absence to testimonial accounts and traumatic memorization. Cinematic, literary, and pictorial representations of the Holocaust run from Borowski’s real life experience in Auschwitz through Grynberg’s sense of mission as a survivor to Polanski’s filmic vision seemingly unrelated to his own survival. We reconstruct the realities of the Holocaust against the post-Holocaust mechanics of idealization and aesthetization, trace the emergence of the new approach to the “other,” and read recent theories (Agamben, Rothberg). In this course, the Polish perspective is juxtaposed to that of Polish Jewry.
B. Shallcross.
Autumn, 2006.


RUSS 23900. Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita. (=FNDL 25300, ISHU 24901)
Popular as Nabokov’s “all-American” novel is, it is rarely discussed beyond its psycho-sexual profile. This intensive text-centered and discussion-based course attempts to supersede the univocal obsession with the novel’s pedophiliac plot as such by concerning itself above all with the novel’s language: language as failure, as mania, and as conjuration.
M. Sternstein.
Winter, 2007.


RUSS 25500/35500. Introduction to Russian Literature I: Beginnings to 1850. (=HUMA 22600, ISHU 22600/32600)
This is a survey of major writers and works from the mysterious Igor Tale to the middle of the nineteenth century. Major figures covered are Derzhavin, Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, and Turgenev. Texts in English.
Autumn.

RUSS 25600/35600. Introduction to Russian Literature II: 1850 to 1900 (=HUMA 24000, ISHU 22400/32400)
This is a survey covering the second half of the nineteenth century. Major figures studied are Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Leskov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, and Chekhov. Representative works are read for their literary value and against their historical, cultural, and intellectual background. Texts in English.
Winter.

RUSS 25700/35700. Introduction to Russian Literature III: Twentieth-Century Russian Literature. (=HUMA 24100, ISHU 23100/33100)
This is a survey of major writers and works of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Special attention is paid to the evolution of modernism and post-modernism in Russia. Specific course topics include Symbolism, the avant-garde of the 1920s, socialist realism, émigré literature, and Russian post-modernism. Writers include Bely, Nabokov, Platonov, Solzhenitsyn and Pelevin. Texts in English.
Spring.

RUSS 29001/39001. Poetic Cinema. (=CMLT 29000/39000, CMST 25501/35501, ISHU 29002, RLIT 39000, RLST 28401)
Films are frequently denoted as “poetic” or “lyrical” in a vague sort of way. It has been applied equally to religious cinema and to the experimental avant-garde. Our task is to interrogate this concept and to try to define what it actually is denoting. Films and critical texts are mainly drawn from Soviet and French cinema of the 1920s to the1930s and the 1960s to the 1990s. Directors include Dovzhenko, Renoir, Cocteau, Resnais, Maya Deren, Tarkovsky, Pasolini, Jarman, and Sokurov. In addition to sampling these directors’ own writings, we examine theories of poetic cinema by major critics from the Russian formalists to Andre Bazin and beyond.
R. Bird.
Winter, 2007.


RUSS 29601/39601. Narrative, Image, Thought. (=ISHU 29601, RLIT 39600, RLST 28201, RUSS 29601/39601)
Knowledge of Russian not required. Russian thought has traditionally developed in close relation to literary and visual art. We focus on key moments in this interaction that include: the romantic invention of a dominant aesthetic and ideological framework; Dostoevsky’s intervention in artistic and ideological debates; and key modernist trends, from the re-discovery of the icon and Russian Orthodoxy (Florensky, Kandinsky, Malevich) to the aesthetics of montage in early Soviet culture (Eisenstein, Rodchenko, Shklovsky). Equal attention is paid to narrative practice and visual style, as well as to their relation to key ideas in intellectual history. Discussion encouraged.
R. Bird.
Spring, 2007.


History and Culture

 

EEUR 23400/33400. Introduction to the Musical Folklore of Central Asia. (=ANTH 25905, MUSI 23503/33503, NEHC 20765/30765)
For course description, see Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations (Near Eastern History and Civilization).
K. Arik.
Spring, 2007.


HIST 81901: Seminar: Russian History-1
Richard Hellie.
Fall 2006.

 

Pedagogy


none 2006-2007


Preparatory courses


available by request