Courses

Slavic Department Listings

Course brochure

See also the list of past years' courses.

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCSN), Czech (CZEC), East European (EEUR), Georgian (GEOR),

General Slavic (SLAV), Polish (POLI), Russian (RUSS), South Slavic (SOSL)

RUSS 21502 / 30302
Adv Russian Through Media-3

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Russian 21302 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Crosslists: 
REES 21502, REES 30302
Spring
2019-2020
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

REES 20001 / 30001
War and Peace

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 22301; CMLT 32301; ENGL 28912; ENGL 32302; FNDL 27103; HIST 23704
Spring
2019-2020
Literature and Linguistics course

Tolstoy’s novel is at once a national epic, a treatise on history, a spiritual meditation, and a masterpiece of realism. This course presents a close reading of one of the world’s great novels, and of the criticism that has been devoted to it, including landmark works by Victor Shklovsky, Boris Eikhenbaum, Isaiah Berlin, and George Steiner.

REES 22000 / 32000
Kafka in Prague

Malynne Steinstern
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
GRMN 29600; GRMN 39600
Spring
2019-2020
Literature and Linguistics course

The goal of this course is a thorough treatment of Kafka's literary work in its Central European, more specifically Czech, context. In critical scholarship, Kafka and his work are often alienated from his Prague milieu. The course revisits the Prague of Kafka's time, with particular reference to Josefov (the Jewish ghetto), Das Prager Deutsch, and Czech/German/Jewish relations of the prewar and interwar years. We discuss most of Kafka's major prose works within this context and beyond (including The Castle, The Trial, and the stories published during his lifetime), as well as selected critical approaches to his work.

POLI 10303
First-Year Polish III

Dag Alexander Lindskog
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Poli 10203 or equivalent; Drill sessions to be arranged.
Spring
2019-2020
Language course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

REES 23108
Contact Linguistics

Salikoko Mufwene
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
LING 20001 or consent of instructor
Crosslists: 
LING 26310; LING 36310
Spring
2019-2020
Literature and Linguistics course

This seminar focuses on current research in contact linguistics in a global perspective, including but not limited to the impact of languages of wider communication (e.g. English, Russian) in contact with other languages. Topics to be covered include the following: language/dialect contact, convergence and language shift resulting in attrition and language endangerment and loss. Other contact-induced linguistic changes and processes to be considered include borrowing, code-switching, code-shifting, diglossia, loss of linguistic restrictions and grammatical permeability, and the impact of language contact in the emergence and/or historical development of languages.

POLI 20303
Second-Year Polish III

Dag Alexander Lindskog
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
POLI 20203 or equivalent; Drill sessions to be arranged.
Spring
2019-2020
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

REES 29021 / 39021
The Shadows of Living Things: The Writings of Mikhail Bulgakov

Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 29020
Spring
2019-2020
Literature and Linguistics course

“What would your good do if evil did not exist, and what would the earth look like if all the shadows disappeared? After all, shadows are cast by things and people…. Do you want to strip the earth of all the trees and living things just because of your fantasy of enjoying naked light?” asks the Devil. Mikhail Bulgakov worked on his novel The Master and Margarita throughout most of his writing career, in Stalin’s Moscow. Bulgakov destroyed his manuscript, re-created it from memory, and reworked it feverishly even as his body was failing him in his battle with death. The result is an intense contemplation on the nature of good and evil, on the role of art and the ethical duty of the artist, but also a dazzling world of magic, witches, and romantic love, and an irresistible seduction into the comedic. Laughter, as shadow and light, as the subversive weapon but also as power’s whip, grounds human relation to both good and evil. Brief excursions to other texts that help us better understand Master and Margarita.

BCSN 10303
First-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 10203 or consent of instructor.
Spring
2019-2020
Language course

In this three-quarter sequence introductory course in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCS) languages and cultures, students are encouraged to concentrate on the language of their interest and choice. The major objective is to build a solid foundation in the grammatical patterns of written and spoken BCS, while introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This is achieved through a communicative situation-based approach, textbook dialogues, reinforcement by the instructor, screenings of film shorts, TV announcements, documentaries, commercials, and the like. The course includes a sociolinguistic component, an essential part of understanding the similarities and differences between the languages. Mandatory drill sessions are held twice per week, offering students ample opportunity to review and practice materials presented in class.

REES 29010 / 39010
20th Century Russian & South East European Emigre Literature

Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 26912; CMLT 36912
Spring
2019-2020
Literature and Linguistics course

Being alienated from myself, as painful as that may be, provides me with that exquisite distance within which perverse pleasure begins, as well as the possibility of my imagining and thinking," writes Julia Kristeva in "Strangers to Ourselves," the book from which this course takes its title. The authors whose works we are going to examine often alternate between nostalgia and the exhilaration of being set free into the breathless possibilities of new lives. Leaving home does not simply mean movement in space. Separated from the sensory boundaries that defined their old selves, immigrants inhabit a warped, fragmentary, disjointed time. Immigrant writers struggle for breath-speech, language, voice, the very stuff of their craft resounds somewhere else. Join us as we explore the pain, the struggle, the failure, and the triumph of emigration and exile. Vladimir Nabokov, Joseph Brodsky, Marina Tsvetaeva, Nina Berberova, Julia Kristeva, Alexander Hemon, Dubravka Ugrešić, Norman Manea, Miroslav Penkov, Ilija Trojanow, Tea Obreht.

BCSN 20303
Second-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian-3

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2019-2020
Language course

The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

BCSN 21300 / 31303
(Re)Branding the Balkan City: Comtemp. Belgrade/Sarajevo/Zagreb

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 20303 or consent of instructor.
Crosslists: 
REES 21300,REES 31303
Spring
2019-2020
Literature and Linguistics course

The course will use an urban studies lens to explore the complex history, infrastructure, and transformations of these three cities, now the capitals of Serbia, Bosnia and Hercegovina, and Croatia. Drawing on anthropological theory and ethnography of the city, we will consider processes of urban destruction and renewal, practices of branding spaces and identities, urban life as praxis, art and design movements, architectural histories and styles, metropolitan citizenship, and the broader politics of space. The course is complemented by cultural and historical media, guest speakers, and virtual tours. Classes are held in English. No knowledge of BCS is required. However, this module can fulfill a language requirement or simply further the study of BCS with additional weekly sections, materials, discussions, and presentations in the target language.

RUSS 10303
First-Year Russian-3

Erik Houle (1); Maria Iakubovich (2); Mark Baugher (3)
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2019-2020
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This year-long course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20303
Second-Year Russian III

Erik Houle (1); Mark Baugher (2)
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2019-2020
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20902 / 30902
Third-Year Russian through Culture III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2019-2020
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 10600
Russian Through Pushkin III

Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10500.
Spring
2018-2019
Language course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin's shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

REES 49701
Colloquium: Cultural Cold War

Eleonora Gilburd
Course level: 
Graduate
Spring
2018-2019
Literature and Linguistics course

In this course we will consider culture wars amidst the Cold War. We will range across media and aesthetic schools to examine the entanglement of art and politics, culture and diplomacy, creativity and propaganda, consumerism and the avant-garde, nuclear aspirations and dystopian visions, artistic freedom and police operations. The course's basic premise is that, notwithstanding the bipolar world it created, the Cold War was a multisided affair, so our readings will extend beyond the United States and the Soviet Union to include various national contexts.

RUSS 10303
First-Year Russian-3

Erik Houle; Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2018-2019
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

REES 24418
Ruining Chekhov: Reading and Staging the Modernist Play

Cheryl Stephenson
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2018-2019
Literature and Linguistics course
"Stanislavski has ruined my play!" Anton Chekhov's notoriously negative response to Konstantin Stanislavski's production of The Cherry Orchard at the Moscow Art Theater provides the point of departure for this course and its examination of both Chekhov's plays and their production history in Russia, the Soviet Union, and abroad. As we investigate the texts, performances, and non-theatrical adaptations of The Seagull, Uncle Vanya, Three Sisters, and The Cherry Orchard, we will explore the particular problems of reading and staging Chekhov, whose often sparse stage directions and ambiguous dialogue create the potential for strikingly different interpretations. Through questioning this openness and other defining features of Chekhov's plays, we will study the ways these productions changed and adapted to new countries, new political contexts, and new tendencies in theater and performance throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Over the course of the quarter, we will bring together our discussion of the stage and screen history of these works together with our own ideas about potential approaches to staging or adapting Chekhov's works.
 

 

REES 26071 / 36071
Film and Revolution

Robert Bird
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMST 24521; CMST 34521
Spring
2018-2019
Literature and Linguistics course

On the fiftieth anniversary of 1968 our course couples the study of revolutionary films (and films about revolution) with seminal readings on revolutionary ideology and on the theory of film and video. The goal will be to articulate the mechanics of revolution and its representation in time-based media. Students will produce a video or videos adapting the rich archive of revolutionary film for today's situation. The films screened will be drawn primarily from Soviet and US cinema, from the 1920s to the present day, proceeding more or less chronologically. We begin with newsreels and a "poetic documentary" by Dziga Vertov; they will be paired with classic readings from revolutionary theory, from Karl Marx and Vladimir Lenin to Fidel Castro and Bill Ayres, and from film theory, including Vertov, Andre Bazin and Jean-Luc Godard. Readings will acquaint students with contemporary assessments of the emancipatory potential of film.

RUSS 20303
Second-Year Russian-3

Erik Houle; Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2018-2019
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

BCSN 10303
First-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian-3

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 10103 or consent of instructor.
Spring
2018-2019
Language course

The major objective of the course is to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time. Knowledge of a Slavic language and background in linguistics not required.

RUSS 20902 / 30902
Third-Year Russian through Culture III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Russian 20701 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Spring
2018-2019
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

BCSN 20303
Second-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian-3

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 20103 or consent of instructor.
Spring
2018-2019
Language course

The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

RUSS 21502 / 30302
Adv Russian Through Media-3

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Russian 21302 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Crosslists: 
REES 21502; REES 30302
Spring
2018-2019
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

BCSN 21400 / 31403
Advanced BCS: Language through Art and Architecture

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 21200/31203 or consent of instructor.
Spring
2018-2019
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is tailored to the needs of the students enrolled, depending on their concentration in the field. It enhances language acquisition with continuous reading and translation of essays, newspaper articles, literary excerpts, letters and other selected writings. Vocabulary building is emphasized by the systematic study of nominal and verbal roots, prefixes and suffixes, and word formation thereafter. Discussion follows each completed reading with a written composition assigned in relation to the topic.

REES 27028 / 37028
David Bergelson’s Strange New World

Harriet Murav
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2018-2019
Literature and Linguistics course

This course introduces the Yiddish modernist David Bergelson (1884-1952) by putting him in dialogue with Anton Chekhov, Vladimir Nabokov, and Isaac Babel. The comparisons place us in three settings: the provinces, in exile in Berlin, and along the revolutionary border. In Chekhov’s Three Sisters and Bergelson’s The End of Everything characters are bored and sense their own belatedness; they’ve missed the main event that is taking place elsewhere, including the joy of their own lives. In Bergelson’s and Nabokov’s Berlin stories, displaced characters find themselves in a strange city of  surfaces and shadows, offering both new pleasures and the unbidden return of the past. In Bergelson’s Judgment and Babel’s Red Cavalry violence and a new, harsh law line the joy and freedom of revolution. In the works to be examined, both time and place are out of joint. Particular attention will be given to the language and literary structures that reproduce-- as an effect of reading-- the temporal and spatial shifts experienced by the characters. No Yiddish or Russian required.

 

CZEC 10303
First-year Czech III

Malynne Sternstein
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2018-2019
Language course

REES 26065 / 36065
The Underground: Alienation, Mobilization, Resistance

Robert Bird
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2018-2019
Literature and Linguistics course

The ancient and multivalent image of the underground has crystallized over the last two centuries to denote sites of disaffection from—and strategies of resistance to—dominant social, political and cultural systems. We will trace the development of this metaphor from the Underground Railroad in the mid-1800s and the French Resistance during World War II to the Weather Underground in the 1960s-1970s, while also considering it as a literary and artistic concept, from Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Notes from the Underground and Ellison’s Invisible Man to Chris Marker’s film La Jetée and Andrei Tarkovsky’s Stalker. Alongside with such literary and cinematic tales, drawing theoretical guidance from refuseniks from Henry David Thoreau to Guy Debord, this course investigates how countercultural spaces become—or fail to become—sites of political resistance, and also how dissenting ideologies give rise to countercultural spaces. We ask about the relation between social deviance (the failure to meet social norms, whether willingly or unwittingly) and political resistance, especially in the conditions of late capitalism and neo-colonialism, when countercultural literature, film and music (rock, punk, hip-hop, DIY aesthetics etc.) get absorbed into—and coopted by—the hegemonic socio-economic system. In closing we will also consider contemporary forms of dissidence—from Pussy Riot to Black Lives Matter—that rely both on the vulnerability of individual bodies and global communication networks.

CZEC 20303
Second-Year Czech-3

Malynne Sternstein
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
CZEC 20203 or consent of instructor
Spring
2018-2019
Literature and Linguistics course

REES 13803
The Soviet Union

Eleonora Gilburd
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
HIST 13803
Spring
2018-2019
Literature and Linguistics course

This lecture course surveys the making and unmaking of the Soviet Union as a society, culture, economy, superpower, and empire from 1917 to 1991. The Soviet Union began as an unprecedented radical experiment in remaking society and economy, ethnic and gender relations, personal identities, even human nature. In the course of its history, it came to resemble other (capitalist) societies, sharing, in turn, their violence, welfare provisions, and consumerism. The story of this transformation—from being unique and exhilarating to being much like everyone else, only poorer and more drab—will be at the center of our exploration. The main themes of the course include social and cultural revolutions; ideology and the role of Marxism; political violence from the birth of the socialist state to the end of the Stalin terror; Stalinism, its origins, practices, aesthetics, legacies, and critiques; law, dissent, and human rights; nationality policies and the role of ethnic minorities; the economy of shortages and the material culture it created; institutions of daily life (communal apartments, courtyards, peasant markets, dachas, and boiler rooms); socialist realism and the Soviet dreamworld.

POLI 10303
First Year Polish-3

Dag Lindskog
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Poli 10203 or consent of instructor.
Spring
2018-2019
Language course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

REES 29018 / 39018
Imaginary Worlds:Fantastic & Magic Realism in Russia& SE Europe

Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 27701, CMLT 37701, RUSS 27300, RUSS 37300
Spring
2018-2019
Literature and Linguistics course

In this course, we will ask what constitutes the fantastic and magic realism as literary genres while reading some of the most interesting writings to have come out of Russia and Southeastern Europe. While considering the stylistic and narrative specificities of this narrative mode, we also think about its political functions —from subversive to escapist, to supportive of a nationalist imaginary—in different contexts and at different historic moments in the two regions.

POLI 20303
Second-Year Polish-3

Dag Lindskog
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Poli 20203 or instructor consent.
Spring
2018-2019
Language course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

REES 29021 / 39021
The Shadows of Living Things: the Writings of Mikhail Bulgakov

Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2018-2019
Literature and Linguistics course

“What would your good do if evil did not exist, and what would the earth look like if all the shadows disappeared? After all, shadows are cast by things and people…. Do you want to strip the earth of all the trees and living things just because of your fantasy of enjoying naked light?” asks the Devil.
 
Mikhail Bulgakov worked on his novel The Master and Margarita throughout most of his writing career, in Stalin’s Moscow. Bulgakov destroyed his manuscript, re-created it from memory, and reworked it feverishly even as his body was failing him in his battle with death.  The result is an intense contemplation on the nature of good and evil, on the role of art and the ethical duty of the artist, but also a dazzling world of magic, witches, and romantic love, and an irresistible seduction into the comedic. Laughter, as shadow and light, as subversive weapon but also as power’s whip, grounds human relation to both good and evil. Brief excursions to other texts that help us better understand Master and Margarita.

POLI 20603 / 30603
Third-Year Polish-3

Dag Lindskog
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Poli 20503 or instructor consent.
Spring
2018-2019
Language course

The process of learning in all three quarters of Third-Year Polish is framed by three themes, which most succinctly but aptly characterize Polish life, culture, and history: in the Autumn Quarter-the noble democracy in the Commonwealth of Both Nations, in the Winter Quarter-the fight for independence, and in the Spring Quarter-the newly independent Poland. During the course of the year, students also improve their knowledge of advanced grammar and stylistics. All work in Polish.

REES 47000
Time and Memory

Harriet Murav
Course level: 
Graduate
Spring
2018-2019
Literature and Linguistics course

At the beginning of the 20th century moderns and modernists announced their break with the past and launched various artistic , philosophical, political, and social experiments that claimed to construct society and the individual anew. The machine, speed, technology, and the future were the watchwords of Futurists and other modernist groups. Revolutionary transformation on all fronts was the way forward. In the same period advances in science and technology radically changed the horizon of possibility. Yet other important artists and thinkers offered the contrasting view that the past remains alive in the present—both in individuals and in human cultures. Memory was key to the future. This seminar focuses on the second tendency by examining the work of three theorists—Henri Bergson, Walter Benjamin, Victor Shklovsky—and three literary authors—Victor Shklovsky, Virginia Woolf, and Osip Mandelshtam.

REES 29021 / 39021
The Shadows of Living Things: the Writings of Mikhail Bulgakov

Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 29020
Spring
2017-2018
Literature and Linguistics course

“What would your good do if evil did not exist, and what would the earth look like if all the shadows disappeared? After all, shadows are cast by things and people…. Do you want to strip the earth of all the trees and living things just because of your fantasy of enjoying naked light?” asks the Devil. Mikhail Bulgakov worked on his novel The Master and Margarita throughout most of his writing career, in Stalin’s Moscow. Bulgakov destroyed his manuscript, re-created it from memory, and reworked it feverishly even as his body was failing him in his battle with death. The result is an intense contemplation on the nature of good and evil, on the role of art and the ethical duty of the artist, but also a dazzling world of magic, witches, and romantic love, and an irresistible seduction into the comedic. Laughter, as shadow and light, as subversive weapon but also as power’s whip, grounds human relation to both good and evil. Brief excursions to other texts that help us better understand Master and Margarita.

POLI 20403 - 20503 - 20603 / 30403 - 30503 - 30603
Third-Year Polish I, II, III

Kinga Kosmala
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
POLI 20103, 20203, 20303 or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

The process of learning in all three quarters of Third-Year Polish is framed by three themes, which most succintly but aptly characterize Polish life, culture, and history: in the Autumn Quarter-the noble democracy in the Commonwealth of Both Nations, in the Winter Quarter-the fight for independence, and in the Spring Quarter-the new independent Poland.  During the course of the year, students also improve their knowlege of advanced grammar and stylistics.  All work in Polish.

REES 26027 / 36027
Jewish Writers in the Russian Tradition

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
JWSC 20234
Spring
2017-2018
Literature and Linguistics course

Considers the experience of Jewish national subjectivity under conditions of Russian and Soviet empire in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. While attentive to practices of physical marginalization and assimilation (the Pale of Settlement, Birobidzhan), we will focus mainly on the literary record in works by Dostoevsky, Solovyov, Kovner, Babel, An-sky, Bagritsky, Grossman, Ehrenburg, and Brodsky. The syllabus also includes works in theatre, painting and film, as well as important critical texts on subjectivity and post-colonial theory.

RUSS 10103 - 10203 - 10303
First Year Russian I, II, III

Erik Houle, Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research.  All five major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening, comprehension, and speaking) are stressed.  Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions.  This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries.  Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20103 - 20203 - 20303
Second Year Russian I, II, III

Erik Houle, Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10103, 10203, 10303 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension.  Systematic study of word formation and other strategics are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating.  Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background.  Conversation practices is held twice a week.

BCSN 21300 / 31300
(Re)Branding the Balkan City: Contemporary Belgrade, Sarajevo, Zagreb, also Advanced BCS

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
First and Second Year BCS or equivalent.
Crosslists: 
REES 21300/31300
Spring
2017-2018
Language course

The course will use an urban studies lens to explore the complex history, infrastructure, and transformations of these three cities, now the capitals of Serbia, Bosnia and Hercegovina, and Croatia. Drawing on anthropological theory and ethnography of the city, we will consider processes of urban destruction and renewal, practices of branding spaces and identities, urban life as praxis, art and design movements, architectural histories and styles, metropolitan citizenship, and the broader politics of space. The course is complemented by cultural and historical media, guest speakers, and virtual tours. Classes are held in English. No knowledge of BCS is required. However, this module can fulfill a language requirement or simply further the study of BCS with additional weekly sections, materials, discussions, and presentations in the target language.

RUSS 20702 - 20802 - 20902
Third Year Russian Culture I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20103, 20203, 20303 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions ot be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21302 - 21402 - 21502 / 30102 - 30202 - 30302
Advanced Russian Through Media I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20702, 20802, 20902 or consent of instructor; drill sessions to be arranged.
Crosslists: 
REES 21502 (Spring), REES 30302 (Spring)
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 29910 - 29911 - 29912 / 39910 - 39911 - 39912
Special Topics in Advanced Russian I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 21302/30102, 21402/30202, 21502/30302 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

Must complete Advanced Russian through Media or equivalent, or obtain consent of instructor. Class meets for 2 hours each week.  We'll work with several topics, all of them are relevant to the general theme of "Geography and Worldview: Russian Perspective". There will be maps, reading materials, several documentaries, clips from TV programs and other media, and feature films. Class meetings will be a combination of group discussions, short presentations, and lectures. Final - one term paper at the end (in English) based on Russian materials.

REES 23900
Lolita

Malynne Sternstein
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 25300, ENGL 28916
Spring
2017-2018
Literature and Linguistics course

“Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul, Lolita: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate, to tap at three on the teeth.” Popular as Nabokov’s “all-American” novel is, it is rarely discussed beyond its psychosexual profile. This intensive text-centered and discussion-based course attempts to supersede the univocal obsession with the novel’s pedophiliac plot as such by concerning itself above all with the novel’s language: language as failure, as mania, and as conjuration.

BCSN 10103 - 10203 - 10303
First-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I, II, III

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

In this three-quarter sequence introductory course in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCS) languages and cultures, students are encouraged to concentrate on the language of their interest and choice.  The major objective is to build a solid foundation in the grammatical  pattens of written and spoken BCS, while introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets.  This is achieved through a communicative situation-based approach, textbook dialogues, reinforcement by the instructor, screenings of film shorts, TV announcements, documentaries, commercials, and the like.  The course includes a socialinguistic component, an essential part of understanding the similarities and differences between the languages.  Mandatory drill sessions are held twice per week, offering students ample opportunity to review and practice materials presented in class.

REES 23137 / 33137
Narratives of Suspense in European/Russian Lit/Film

Esther Peters
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 22100,CMST 25102,CMST 35102,ENGL 26901,ENGL 46901
Spring
2017-2018
Literature and Linguistics course

This course examines the nature and creation of suspense in literature and film as an introduction to narrative theory. We will question how and why stories are created, as well as what motivates us to continue reading, watching, and listening to stories. We will explore how particular genres (such as detective stories and thrillers) and the mediums of literature and film influence our understanding of suspense and narrative more broadly. Close readings of primary sources will be supplemented with critical and theoretical readings. Literary readings will include work by John Buchan, Arthur Conan Doyle, Feodor Dostoevsky, Graham Green, Bohumil Hrabal, and J.M. Coetzee. We will also explore Alfred Hitchcock's take on 39 Steps and the Czech New Wave manifesto film, Pearls of the Deep. With theoretical readings by: Roland Barthes, Viktor Shklovsky, Erich Auerbach, Paul Ricoeur, and others.

POLI 10103 - 10203 - 10303
First-Year Polish I, II, III

Kinga Kosmala
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture.  It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g., communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

REES 29018 / 39018
Imaginary Worlds:Fantastic & Magic Realism in Russia & Southeastern Europe

Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Readings in English. Background in Russia and the Balkans will make the course easier, but is not required.
Crosslists: 
CMLT 27701, CMLT 37701
Spring
2017-2018
Literature and Linguistics course

In this course, we will ask what constitutes the fantastic and magic realism as literary genres while reading some of the most interesting writings to have come out of Russia and Southeastern Europe. While considering the stylistic and narrative specificities of this narrative mode, we also think about its political functions —from subversive to escapist, to supportive of a nationalist imaginary—in different contexts and at different historic moments in the two regions.

POLI 20103 - 20203 - 20303
Second-Year Polish I, II, III

Kinga Kosmala
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
POLI 10103, 10203, 10303 or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies.  Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles.  In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions.  Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

RUSS 20702 - 20802 - 20902
Third Year Russian Culture I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20103, 20203, 20303 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions ot be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

BCSN 10103 - 10203 - 10303
First-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I, II, III

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

In this three-quarter sequence introductory course in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCS) languages and cultures, students are encouraged to concentrate on the language of their interest and choice. The major objective is to build a solid foundation in the grammatical patterns of written and spoken BCS, while introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This is achieved through a communicative situation-based approach, textbook dialogues, reinforcement by the instructor, screenings of film shorts, TV announcements, documentaries, commercials, and the like. The course includes a sociolinguistic component, an essential part of understanding the similarities and differences between the languages. Mandatory drill sessions are held twice per week, offering students ample opportunity to review and practice materials presented in class.

RUSS 21302 - 21402 - 21502 / 30102 - 30202 - 30302
Advanced Russian Through Media I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20702, 20802, 20902 or consent of instructor; drill sessions to be arranged.
Crosslists: 
REES 21502 (Spring), REES 30302 (Spring)
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

BCSN 20103 - 20203 - 20303
Second-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I, II, III

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 10103/10203/10303
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

The Second-Year course in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian languages and cultures is a continuation of First-Year BCS, and therefore assumes one year of formal study of the target language(s) or equivalent coursework elsewhere. The course is focused on spoken and written modern BCS, emphasizing communicative practice in authentic cultural contexts. The language(s) are introduced through a series of dialogues gathered from a variety of textbooks published in Serbia, Croatia, and Bosnia, as well as newspaper articles, short biographies, poems, and song lyrics in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. A vast archive of audiovisual materials, representing both high and popular culture, constitute an integral part of every unit. Simultaneously, aural comprehension, speaking, grammar, and vocabulary are reinforced and further developed throughout the year. Mandatory drill sessions are held twice a week, offering students ample opportunity to review and practice materials presented in class.

REES 20020 / 30020
Pale Fire

Malynne Sternstein
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 25311
Spring
2016-2017
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is an intensive reading of Pale Fire by Nabokov.

BCSN 21300 / 31300
(Re)Branding the Balkan City: Contemporary Belgrade, Sarajevo, Zagreb, also Advanced BCS

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
REES 21300/31300
Spring
2016-2017
Language course

The course will use an urban studies lens to explore the complex history, infrastructure, and transformations of these three cities, now the capitals of Serbia, Bosnia and Hercegovina, and Croatia. Drawing on anthropological theory and ethnography of the city, we will consider processes of urban destruction and renewal, practices of branding spaces and identities, urban life as praxis, art and design movements, architectural histories and styles, metropolitan citizenship, and the broader politics of space. The course is complemented by cultural and historical media, guest speakers, and virtual tours. Classes are held in English. No knowledge of BCS is required. However, this module can fulfill a language requirement or simply further the study of BCS with additional weekly sections, materials, discussions, and presentations in the target language.

REES 21006 / 31006
Joseph Conrad’s: The Secret Agent

Bożena Shallcross
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
ENGL 21006/31006, FNDL 21006
Spring
2016-2017
Literature and Linguistics course

This course centers on a close reading of Joseph Conrad’s The Secret Agent: A Simple Tale (1907). Contemporary critics often consider this novel to be the archetypal fictional work about terrorism, as it is based on the bomb attack that occurred on the Royal Observatory in Greenwich in 1888. The Secret Agent demonstrates, however, much more than its prophetic significance rediscovered after 9/11. Therefore, the course seeks how the novel’s relevance stems in equal measure from Conrad’s interest in a wider political process and his distrust of state power; in particular, the course explores how these forces determine the individual caught in a confining situation. We read The Secret Agent as a political novel, which in its struggle for solutions defies chaos as well as an imposition of a single ideology or one authorial point of view. The novel’s ambiguities and political antinomies reveal its polyphonic structure allowing for interdisciplinary readings (Marxist, contextual, proto-existentialist, post-Lacanian) that also present an opportunity to critically overview the established approaches to main Conradian themes; for example, in order to destabilize the standard view of the writer as a conservative anti-revolutionary, we consider some biographical connections, such as his family members’ radical (“Red”) social agenda of the abolishment of serfdom. In analyzing the formation of the narrative’s ideology we discuss Conrad’s historical pessimism that demonstrates with sustained irony how capitalism breeds social injustice that, in turn, breeds anarchism. The class also focuses on just how the novel exposes duplicity in staging surveillance, terrorism, as well as adjacent forms of violence or sacrifice. The critical texts include several older but still influential readings (Jameson, Eagleton) of the novel’s political and social dimension, as well as the most recent pronouncements of A Simple Tale’s complexity. All texts are in English.

CZEC 10103 - 10203 - 10303
First-Year Czech I, II, III

Esther Peters
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research.

REES 21000 / 31000
Gombrowicz: The Writer as Philosopher

Bożena Shallcross
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
ISHU 29405, FNDL 26903
Spring
2016-2017
Literature and Linguistics course

In this course, we will dwell on Witold Gombrowicz the philosopher, exploring the components of his authorial style that substantiate his claim to both the literary and the philosophical spheres. This erudite Polish author is a prime 20th century modernist whose novels, entangled in an ongoing battle with fundamental questions and, indeed, with existence itself, explode with uncanny laughter. In contrast to many of his contemporary writers who established their reputation by applying existing philosophical models, Gombrowicz employed ironically his philosophical erudition, while engaging in his philosophical récit the literary and cultural tropes which derived from his Polish cultural heritage.  Over the next ten weeks, we will investigate how he twisted these references and tropes to inform a distinctly Gombrowiczian version of performative philosophy. We will read Gombrowicz’s novels, lectures on philosophy and some of his autobiographical writings to seek answers to our overarching question: what makes this author a philosopher?

POLI 10103 - 10203 - 10303
First-Year Polish I, II, III

Kinga Kosmala
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

REES 29013 / 39013
The Burden of History: The Nation and Its Lost Paradise.

Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
REES 39013,CMLT 23401,CMLT 33401,ISHU 22606,NEHC 20573,NEHC 30573
Spring
2016-2017
Literature and Linguistics course

How and why do national identities provoke the deep emotional attachments that they do? In this course we try to understand these emotional attachments by examining the narrative of loss and redemption through which most nations in the Balkans retell their Ottoman past. We begin by considering the mythic temporality of the Romantic national narrative while focusing on specific national literary texts where the national past is retold through the formula of original wholeness, foreign invasion, Passion, and Salvation. We then proceed to unpack the structural role of the different elements of that narrative. With the help of Žižek’s theory of the subject as constituted by trauma, we think about the national fixation on the trauma of loss, and the role of trauma in the formation of national consciousness. Specific theme inquiries involve the figure of the Janissary as self and other, brotherhood and fratricide, and the writing of the national trauma on the individual physical body. Special attention is given to the general aesthetic of victimhood, the casting of the victimized national self as the object of the “other’s perverse desire.” With the help of Freud, Žižek, and Kant we consider the transformation of national victimhood into the sublimity of the national self. The main primary texts include Petar Njegoš’ Mountain Wreath (Serbia and Montenegro), Ismail Kadare’s The Castle (Albania), Anton Donchev’s Time of Parting (Bulgaria).

POLI 20103 - 20203 - 20303
Second-Year Polish I, II, III

Kinga Kosmala
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
POLI 10103, 10203, 10303 or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

REES 29018 / 39018
Imaginary Worlds: The Fantastic and Magic Realism from Russia and Southeastern Europe

Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2016-2017
Literature and Linguistics course

In this course, we will ask what constitutes the fantastic and magic realism as literary genres while reading some of the most interesting writings to have come out of Russia and Southeastern Europe. While considering the stylistic and narrative specificities of this narrative mode, we also think about its political functions —from subversive to escapist, to supportive of a nationalist imaginary—in different contexts and at different historic moments in the two regions.

POLI 20403 - 20503 - 20603 / 30403 - 30503 - 30603
Third-Year Polish I, II, III

Kinga Kosmala
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
POLI 20103, 20203, 20303 or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

The process of learning in all three quarters of Third-Year Polish is framed by three themes, which most succinctly but aptly characterize Polish life, culture, and history: in the Autumn Quarter—the noble democracy in the Commonwealth of Both Nations, in the Winter Quarter—the fight for independence, and in the Spring Quarter—the newly independent Poland. During the course of the year, students also improve their knowledge of advanced grammar and stylistics. All work in Polish.

REES 23137 / 33137
Narratives of Suspense in European/Russian Lit/Film

Esther Peters
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 22100,CMST 25102,CMST 35102,ENGL 26901,ENGL 46901
Spring
2016-2017
Literature and Linguistics course

This course examines the nature and creation of suspense in literature and film as an introduction to narrative theory.  We will question how and why stories are created, as well as what motivates us to continue reading, watching, and listening to stories.  We will explore how particular genres (such as detective stories and thrillers) and the mediums of literature and film influence our understanding of suspense and narrative more broadly.  Close readings of primary sources will be supplemented with critical and theoretical readings.  Literary readings will include work by John Buchan, Arthur Conan Doyle, Feodor Dostoevsky, Graham Green, Bohumil Hrabal, and J.M. Coetzee.  We will also explore Alfred Hitchcock's take on 39 Steps and the Czech New Wave manifesto film, Pearls of the Deep.  With theoretical readings by: Roland Barthes, Viktor Shklovsky, Erich Auerbach,  Paul Ricoeur, and others.

POLI 24100 - 24200 - 24300 / 40100 - 40200 - 40300
Polish Through Literary Reading I, II, III

Kinga Kosmala
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
POLI 20403/30403, 20503/30503, 20603/30503 or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

An advanced language course emphasizing spoken and written Polish. Readings include original Polish prose and poetry as well as nonfiction. Intensive grammar review and vocabulary building. For students who have taken Third Year Polish and for native or heritage speakers who want to read Polish literature in the original. Readings and discussions in Polish.

RUSS 10103 - 10203 - 10303
First Year Russian I, II, III

Erik Houle, Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20103 - 20203 - 20303
Second Year Russian I, II, III

Erik Houle, Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10103, 10203, 10303 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

BCSN 10103 - 10203 - 10303
First-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

The major objective of the course is to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets.  This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests.  Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.  Knowledge of a Slavic language and background in linguistics not required.

RUSS 21002 - 21102 - 21202
Fourth-Year Russian: Short Story I, II, III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
PQ: RUSS 20902 or Consent of Instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

RUSS 21302 - 21402 - 21502 / 30102 - 30202 - 30302
Advanced Russian Through Media I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
PQ: RUSS 21202 or Consent of Instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

REES 26049 / 36049
The Short Story in Russian Literature

Malynne Sternstein
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2015-2016
Literature and Linguistics course

The short story demands versatility and resourcefulness of its author, a creativity and a discipline that distinguishes itself from the same needed for the novel. Russian literature is known best for its hulking novels or for its Golden and Silver Age lyrics. In this course, it is the short story in Russian literary history that is explored and investigated as an alternative locus of expression of a separate ontology. Informed by theories of the short story form, in the course we closely scrutinize the short fiction of Pushkin, Gogol', Turgenev, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pelevin, Tolstaya, Ulitskaya, among others.

BCSN 20103 - 20203 - 20303
Second-Year Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I, II, III

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

The Second-Year course in Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCS) languages and cultures is a continuation of First-Year BCS. It assumes one year of formal study of the target language(s) or equivalent coursework elsewhere. The course is focused on spoken and written modern BCS, emphasizing communicative practice in authentic cultural contexts. The language(s) are introduced through a series of dialogues gathered from a variety of textbooks published in Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia, as well as newspaper articles, short biographies, poems, and song lyrics in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. A vast amount of audiovisual materials, representing both high and popular culture, constitute an integral part of every unit. Simultaneously, aural comprehension, speaking, grammar, and vocabulary are reinforced and further developed throughout the year with each unit. The course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans, guest speakers, cultural events, and dinner parties. Mandatory drill sessions are held twice per week.

MWF 11:30-12:20 PM

REES 28002 / 38002
Czech New Wave Cinema

Malynne Sternstein
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMST 24401, CMST 34401
Spring
2015-2016
Literature and Linguistics course

POLI 10103 - 10203 - 10303
First-Year Polish I, II, III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g. communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students’ native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure. Autumn, Winter, Spring. Meets on MWF 10:30-11:20. Drill sessions to be arranged.

REES 29018 / 39018
Imaginary Worlds:Fantastic & Magic Realism in Russia & Southeastern Europe

Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Readings in English. Background in Russia and the Balkans will make the course easier, but is not required.
Crosslists: 
CMLT 27701, CMLT 37701
Spring
2015-2016
Literature and Linguistics course

In this course, we will ask what constitutes the fantastic and magic realism as literary genres while reading some of the most interesting writings to have come out of Russia and Southeastern Europe. While considering the stylistic and narrative specificities of this narrative mode, we also think about its political functions —from subversive to escapist, to supportive of a nationalist imaginary—in different contexts and at different historic moments in the two regions.

POLI 20103 - 20203 - 20303
Second-Year Polish I, II, III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student’s level of preparation. Autumn, Winter, Spring. Meets on MWF 10:30-11:20. Drill sessions to be arranged.
 

REES 29700
B.A. Paper Workshop

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Literature and Linguistics course

POLI 30103 - 30203 - 30303
Third-Year Polish I, II, III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

PQ: POLI 20300 or equivalent. The process of learning in all three quarters of Third Year Polish is framed by three themes, which most succinctly but aptly characterize the Polish life, culture and history: in the Fall Quarter – the noble democracy in the Commonwealth of Both Nations, in the Winter Quarter – the fight for independence, and in the Spring Quarter – the newly independent Poland. During the course of the year, students also improve their knowledge of advanced grammar and stylistics. All work in Polish. Autumn, Winter, Spring. Meets on MWF 11:30-12:20. Conversation hour to be arranged.

REES 29900
Reading/Research: Russian and Eastern European Studies

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Literature and Linguistics course

POLI 20503 - 20603 - 20703 / 40103 - 40203 - 40303
Polish Through Literary Readings I, II, III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

Meets: TBA
PQ: POLI 303 or equivalent. An advanced language course emphasizing spoken and written Polish. Readings include original Polish prose and poetry as well as nonfiction. Intensive grammar review and vocabulary building. For students who have taken Third Year Polish and for native or heritage speakers who want to read Polish literature in the original. Readings and discussions in Polish. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

REES 21006 / 31006
Joseph Conrad’s: The Secret Agent

Bozena Shallcross
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
ENGL 21006/31006
Spring
2015-2016
Literature and Linguistics course

This course centers on a close reading of Joseph Conrad’s The Secret Agent: A Simple Tale (1907). Contemporary critics often consider this novel to be the archetypal fictional work about terrorism, as it is based on the bomb attack that occurred on the Royal Observatory in Greenwich in 1888. The Secret Agent demonstrates, however, much more than its prophetic significance rediscovered after 9/11. Therefore, the course seeks how the novel’s relevance stems in equal measure from Conrad’s interest in a wider political process and his distrust of state power; in particular, the course explores how these forces determine the individual caught in a confining situation. We read The Secret Agent as a political novel, which in its struggle for solutions defies chaos as well as an imposition of a single ideology or one authorial point of view. The novel’s ambiguities and political antinomies reveal its polyphonic structure allowing for interdisciplinary readings (Marxist, contextual, proto-existentialist, post-Lacanian) that also present an opportunity to critically overview the established approaches to main Conradian themes; for example, in order to destabilize the standard view of the writer as a conservative anti-revolutionary of Polish ilk, we consider the biographical connection, such as his family members’ radical (“Red”) social agenda of the abolishment of serfdom. In analyzing the formation of the narrative’s ideology we analyze Conrad’s historical pessimism that demonstrates with sustained irony how capitalism breeds social injustice that, in turn, breeds anarchism. The class also focuses on just how the novel exposes duplicity in staging surveillance, terrorism, as well as adjacent forms of violence or sacrifice. The critical texts include several but influential readings of the novel’s political and social dimension, as well as the most recent pronouncements of its complexity. All texts are in English.

RUSS 10103 - 10203 - 10303
First-Year Russian I, II, III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

BCSN 21300
(Re)Branding the Balkan City: Contemporary Belgrade, Sarajevo, Zagreb (also Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian)

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2015-2016
Language course

The course will use an urban studies lens to explore the complex history, infrastructure, and transformations of these cities. Drawing on anthropological theory and ethnography of the city, it will consider processes of urban destruction and renewal, practices of branding spaces and identities, urban life as praxis, art and design movements, and the broader politics of space.
The course is taught in English. No knowledge of Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCS) is required. However, this module can fulfill a language requirement or simply further the study of BCS with additional weekly sections, materials, discussions, and presentations in the target language.

 

RUSS 10103 - 10203 - 10303
Second-Year Russian I, II, III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
PQ: Russ 10300 or Consent of Instructor, Drill Sessions to be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

REES 27019 / 37019
The Holocaust Object

Bozena Shallcross
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
JWSC 29500, ANTH 23910, ANTH 35035
Spring
2015-2016
Literature and Linguistics course

In this course we explore various ontological and representational modes of the Holocaust material object world as it was represented during WWII. Then, we interrogate the post-Holocaust artifacts and material remnants, as they are displayed, curated, controlled, and narrated in the memorial sites and museums of former ghettos, extermination and concentration camps. These sites which – once the locations of genocide – are now places of remembrance, the (post)human, and material remnants, also serve educational purposes. Therefore, we study the ways in which this material world, ranging from infrastructure to detritus, has been subjected to two, often conflicting, tasks of representation and preservation, which we view through a prism of authenticity. In order to study representation, we critically engage a textual and visual reading of museum narrations and fiction writings; to tackle with demands of preservation we apply a neo-materialist approach. Of special interest are survivors’ testimonies as appended to the artifacts they donated. The course will also equip you with salient critical tools for future creative research in the Holocaust studies.

RUSS 20702 - 20802 - 20902
Third-Year Russian: Culture I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
PQ: RUSS 20300 or Consent of Instructor
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

RUSS 20902
Third-Year Russian through Culture III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

EEUR 21000 / 31000
Romani Language and Linguistics

V. Friedman
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LING 27810/37810, ANTH 27700/47900
Spring
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

An introduction to the language of the Roms (Gypsies).  The course will be based on the Arli diealect currently in official use in the Republic of Macedonia, but due attention will be given to other dialects of Europe and the United States.  The course will begin with an introduction to Romani linguistic history followed by an outline of Romani grammar based on Macedonian Arli.  This will serve as the basis of comparison with other dialects.  The course will include readings of authentic texts and discussion of questions of grammar,  standardization, and Romani language in society.  

CZEC 10300
Elementary Czech III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
CZEC 10200 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research.

RUSS 21202
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 22302 / 32302
War and Peace

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 22301,CMLT 32301,ENGL 28912,ENGL 32302,FNDL 27103,HIST 23704
Spring
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

CZEC 20300
Second-Year Czech III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
CZEC 20200 or consent of instructor.
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.

RUSS 21502 / 30202
Advanced Russian through Media III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

SLAV 24411
The Interrupted Word: Photographs in Contemporary Central European Literature of Witness

Katie Tucker
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

Occasionally dismissed as a postmodern gimmick, the insertion of photographs into literary texts is nonetheless a conspicuous fact of contemporary prose, and particularly of literature of witness. How do these embedded photographs function? Do they buttress the veracity of testimony? Or, do they mark out an inadequacy, even a failure, of language? Do they support the narrative, or undermine it?  In this course, we will focus on the literary legacy of three historical moments of witness—Germany after WWII, Yugoslav Successor States after the Yugoslav Wars of the 1990s, and Post-Soviet Poland—to ground a theoretical analysis of the function of photographs in texts. We will begin by tracing the history of critical thought on photography, from Benjamin through the seminal works of Sontag and Barthes and finally to the contemporary theories put forth by W.J.T. Mitchell and Slavoj Žižek. As the four novels which will serve as touchstones for our theoretical inquiry (by W.G. Sebald, Dubravka Ugrešić, Aleksandar Hemon, and Paveł Huelle) were all composed at both a temporal and spatial remove from their historical referent, we will also engage the discourses of post-memory and exilic literature.

CZEC 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 25700 / 35700
Russian Literature from Modernism to Post-Modernism

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

Given the importance of the written word in Russian culture, it is no surprise that writers were full-blooded participants in Russia's tumultuous recent history, which has lurched from war to war, and from revolution to revolution. The change of political regimes has only been outpaced by the change of aesthetic regimes, from realism to symbolism, and then from socialist realism to post-modernism. We sample the major writers, texts, and literary doctrines, paying close attention to the way they responded and contributed to historical events. This course counts as the third part of the survey of Russian literature. Texts in English.

CZEC 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of Instructor and Dept. Advisor; College Reading & research form required; Enter section from faculty list
Autumn Spring Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

GEOR 22300 / 32300
Elementary Georgian-3

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
EEUR 21600,EEUR 31600,LGLN 22300,LGLN 32300
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

POLI 10300
Elementary Polish III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
POLI 10200 or consent of instructor
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

GEOR 22600 / 32600
Intermediate Georgian-3

T. Wysocki-Niimi
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LGLN 22600,LGLN 32600
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

POLI 20300
Second-Year Polish III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

22900 / 32900
Advanced Georgian-3

T. Wysocki-Niimi
Crosslists: 
LGLN 22900, LGLN 32900
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

POLI 20700 / 30300
Advanced Polish III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

Students in this course discuss selected readings (primarily short stories chosen by the instructor) in Polish during the week. The level of work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. All work in Polish.

SOSL 26610 / 36610
The Brighter Side of the Balkans: Humor & Satire in Lit & Film

V. Friedman, A. Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
NEHC 20884,NEHC 30884, CMLT 26610
Spring
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

Laughter is universal but its causes are culturally determined. A joke in one culture can be a shaggy dog story in another.  The figure of the trickster occurs in many places and times and under many guises. Stereotypes can be revelatory about those who deploy them. At the same time, humor can be both an outlet and a danger. There is a special word in Russian for those sentenced to prison for telling political jokes.  This course focuses on Balkan humor, which, like the Balkans itself, is located in a space where "Western Europe", "Eastern Europe" "Central Europe" "The Mediterranean", "The Levant", and the "Near/Middle East" intersect in various ways (linguistically and culturally), compete for dominance or resist domination, and ultimately create a unique--albeit fuzzily bounded--subject of study.

In this course, we examine the poetics of laughter in the Balkans. In order to do so, we introduce humor as both cultural and transnational. We unpack the multiple layers of cultural meaning in the logic of “Balkan humor.” We also examine the functions and mechanisms of laughter, both in terms of cultural specificity and general practice and theories of humor. Thus, the study of Balkan humor will help us elucidate the “Balkan” and the “World,” and will provide insight not only into cultural mores and social relations, but into the very notion of “funny.” Our own laughter in class will be the best measure of our success – both cultural and intellectual.

RUSS 10300
First-Year Russian III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

SOSL 27700 / 37700
Imaginary Worlds: Fantastic & Magic Realism in Russia & Southeastern Europe

A. Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Readings in English. Background in Russia and the Balkans will make the course easier, but is not required.
Crosslists: 
CMLT 27701, CMLT 37701, RUSS 27300, RUSS 37300
Spring
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

In this course, we will ask what constitutes the fantastic and magic realism as literary genres while reading some of the most interesting writings to have come out of Russia and Southeastern Europe. While considering the stylistic and narrative specificities of this narrative mode, we also think about its political functions —from subversive to escapist, to supportive of a nationalist imaginary—in different contexts and at different historic moments in the two regions.

BCSN 10300 / 31200
Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 10200 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

The major objective of the courseis to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

RUSS 20300
Second-Year Russian III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

SOSL 21700 / 31700
Structure of Macedonian

V. Friedman
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Knowledge of another Slavic or Balkan language
Crosslists: 
LING 24310/34310
Spring
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

An introduction to the standard language of the Republic of Macedonia. Macedonian is often described as the most Balkan of the Balkan languages. The course begins with a brief introduction to Macedonian linguistic history followed by an outline of Macedonian grammar and readings of authentic texts. There is also discussion of questions of grammar, standardization, and Macedonian language in society. Issues of Balkan and Slavic linguistics are also touched upon. 

BCSN 20300 / 32200
Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 20200 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

RUSS 20600
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

EEUR 20900 / 30900
Structure of Albanian

V. Friedman
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LING 29701/39701
Spring
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

This is a rare opportunity to get a functional grasp of one of the least-studied national languages of Europe. Albanian is of relevance for Indo-Europeanists, Balkanists, Classicists, Islamicists, and any social scientist with an interest in Southeastern Europe. In addition to being the majority language in Albania and Kosovo, it is spoken by compact populations in all their neighboring countries, as well as by old enclaves in Italy, Croatia, Bulgaria, Turkey, Romania, and Ukraine, and by more recent émigré groups in Western Europe, North America, and Australia. The course focuses on giving students an understanding of the grammatical structure of Albanian as well as sufficient reading knowledge for the independent development of the ability to pursue research.

29700
Reading and Research Course

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2014-2015
Language course

29900
BA Paper

Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Open only to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature. Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a q
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a qua
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

CZEC 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 10300
First-Year Russian III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

SOSL 26610 / 36610
The Brighter Side of the Balkans

V. Friedman, A. Ilieva
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
NEHC 20884,NEHC 30884
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

Laughter is universal but its causes are culturally determined. A joke in one culture can be a shaggy dog story in another.  The figure of the trickster occurs in many places and times and under many guises. Stereotypes can be revelatory about those who deploy them. At the same time, humor can be both an outlet and a danger. There is a special word in Russian for those sentenced to prison for telling political jokes.  This course focuses on Balkan humor, which, like the Balkans itself, is located in a space where "Western Europe", "Eastern Europe" "Central Europe" "The Mediterranean", "The Levant", and the "Near/Middle East" intersect in various ways (linguistically and culturally), compete for dominance or resist domination, and ultimately create a unique--albeit fuzzily bounded--subject of study.

In this course, we examine the poetics of laughter in the Balkans. In order to do so, we introduce humor as both cultural and transnational. We unpack the multiple layers of cultural meaning in the logic of “Balkan humor.” We also examine the functions and mechanisms of laughter, both in terms of cultural specificity and general practice and theories of humor. Thus, the study of Balkan humor will help us elucidate the “Balkan” and the “World,” and will provide insight not only into cultural mores and social relations, but into the very notion of “funny.” Our own laughter in class will be the best measure of our success – both cultural and intellectual.

CZEC 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a qu
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 10600
Russian through Pushkin III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin’s shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

SOSL 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

SLAV 22302 / 32302
Literatures of the Christian East: Late Antiquity, Byzantium, and Medieval Russia

Boris Maslov
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 32302,CLAS 31113,CLCV 21113,CMLT 22302
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

After the fall of Rome in 476 CE, literatures of the Latin West and—predominantly Greek-speaking—Eastern provinces of the Roman empire followed two very different paths. Covering both religious and secular genres, we will survey some of the most interesting texts written in the Christian East in the period from 330 CE (foundation of Constantinople) to the late 17th century (Westernization of Russia). Our focus throughout will be on continuities within particular styles and types of discourse (court entertainment, rhetoric, historiography, hagiography) and their functions within East Christian cultures. Readings will include Digenes Akritas and Song of Igor’s Campaign, as well as texts by Emperor Julian the Apostate, Gregory of Nazianzus, Emphraim the Syrian, Anna Comnena, Psellos, Ivan the Terrible, and Archbishop Avvakum. No prerequisites. All readings in English.

RUSS 20300
Second-Year Russian III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

SOSL 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a qua
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

SLAV 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 20600
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 25007
The Places of Memory, 1780-1880

Monica Felix
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
No prerequisites. All readings in English with optional reading groups to discuss German and Russian works in the original for all interested students.
Crosslists: 
CMLT 25007, GRMN 25014
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course will investigate the affinities between place and memory in literature. In considering works that span a century of literature, we will reflect on memory as a force that emerges as an expression of self – or nation – that is tethered to objects, places, or structures. Course readings will be drawn primarily from German, Russian, and Anglophone literatures (Eichendorff, Tieck, Hoffmann, Fet, Tiutchev, Pushkin, Elliot, Scott, Brontë, others). Supplementary readings drawn from literary criticism, philosophy, historiography, and complementary fields will help us to consider the intersection of literature and history as it relates to questions of a historically constructed subject or nation. Topics include collaborative memory, romanticism, intertextuality, historical representation, historical fiction, and nostalgia.

SLAV 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality gra
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 20902
Third-Year Russian through Culture III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

SLAV 56101
The Second World War Revisited—A Jewish Perspective

Dan Diner
Course level: 
Graduate
Crosslists: 
HIST 56101
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

The course will approach World War II with a specific "Jewish Question," so to speak. What historical, strategic, and military factors caused the fates of the Jews of Europe and the Mandatory Palestine to differ? In order to understand this and similar questions, a new view of the war and its prehistory is required. This course will consider French and British intentions in and reactions to developments in East Asia, South Asia, and the Middle East since 1919, and the entanglement of these developments with those on the European continent. The course will focus on imperial, continental, colonial, and Jewish history, and how these relate to the question of inquiry.

POLI 10300
Elementary Polish III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

RUSS 21202
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

10300 / 31200
Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

Knowledge of a Slavic language and background in linguistics not required. The major objective of the courseis to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

SLAV 23509 / 33509
Jews of Central & East-Central Europe during the Interwar Period

Dan Diner
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
HIST 23509/33509
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

The course intends to lay the foundations for understanding the historical constellation of the Jews in Central and East-Central Europe in the inter-war period, 1919-1939. First, we consider the structural transformation from empires into nation-states as the backdrop of World War I and its aftershocks, especially the pogroms and anti-Jewish violence that accompanied the rise of ethnic nationalism in newly established nations-states. Next, we concentrate on the year 1919 and the Paris Peace Conference, with the minority-treaties as the "Jewish" theme. Finally, we focus on the dissolution of the political order, using the framework of the League of Nations and its repercussions on Jewish life in the region. The course focus will be to gain knowledge and historical awareness concerning Central and East-Central Jewish life; the course will also consider questions of methodology and theory of Jewish history in the modern age.

POLI 20300
Second-Year Polish III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

RUSS 21502 / 30302
Advanced Russian through Media III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

BCSN 20300 / 32200
Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 20200 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

RUSS 26207 / 36207
The Transnational Subject: Jewish Writers and Russian Lit

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

Considers the experience of Jewish national subjectivity under conditions of Russian and Soviet empire in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. While attentive to practices of physical marginalization and assimilation (the Pale of Settlement, Birobidzhan), we will focus mainly on the literary record in works by Dostoevsky, Solovyov, Kovner, Babel, An-sky, Bagritsky, Grossman, Ehrenburg, and Brodsky. The syllabus also includes works in theatre, painting and film, as well as important critical texts on subjectivity and post-colonial theory.

POLI 20700 / 30300
Advanced Polish III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

Students in this course discuss selected readings (primarily short stories chosen by the instructor) in Polish during the week. The level of work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. All work in Polish.

RUSS 25700 / 35700
Russian Literature from Modernism to Post-Modernism

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

Given the importance of the written word in Russian culture, it is no surprise that writers were full-blooded participants in Russia's tumultuous recent history, which has lurched from war to war, and from revolution to revolution. The change of political regimes has only been outpaced by the change of aesthetic regimes, from realism to symbolism, and then from socialist realism to post-modernism. We sample the major writers, texts, and literary doctrines, paying close attention to the way they responded and contributed to historical events. This course counts as the third part of the survey of Russian literature. Texts in English.

BCSN 29700
Reading and Research Course

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Language course

POLI 25303 / 35303
Kieslowski's French Cinema

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 25312
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

Krzysztof Kieślowski’s long-lived obsession with parallel histories and repeated chances is best illustrated by his The Double Life of Veronique. The possibility of free choice resulting in being granted a second chance conjoins this film with his French triptych White, Blue, Red, all co-written by Krzysztof Piesiewicz. In this course we discuss why and how in the Kieślowski/Piesiewicz virtual universe the possibility of reconstituting one’s identity, triggered by tragic loss and betrayal, reveals an ever-ambiguous reality. We also analyze how these concepts, posited with visually and aurally dazzling artistry, shift the popular image of Kieślowski as auteur to his viewers’ as co-creators. We read selections from current criticism on the “Three Color Trilogy.” All materials in English.

RUSS 26206 / 36206
Jewish Writers in Russian Literature

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

CZEC 10300
Elementary Czech III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research.

POLI 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

CZEC 20300
Second-Year Czech III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.

POLI 30100 - 30200 - 30300
Advanced Polish I, II, III

Prerequisites: 
POLI 20300 or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

Students in this course discuss selected readings (primarily short stories chosen by the instructor) in Polish during the week. The level of work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. All work in Polish.

RUSS 29700
Reading and Research Course

Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

CZEC 29900
BA Paper

Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructorand Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade.

POLI 29700
Reading and Research Course

Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required tosubmit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

RUSS 29900
BA Paper

Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade.

EEUR 21100 - 21200 - 21300 / 31100 - 31200 - 31300
Elementary Modern Armenian I, II, III

H. Haroutunian
Crosslists: 
ARME 10101-10102-10103, LGLN10101-10102-10103
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

This three-quarter sequence utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids to enable students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet, and basic grammatical structures, as well as toachieve a reasonable level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). Considerable amounts of historical/political and social/cultural issues about Armenia are built intothis sequence to prepare students who intend to conduct research in Armenian studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

POLI 29900
BA Paper

Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading andResearch Course Form. Open only to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature. This course must be taken for a quality grade.

SOSL 26610 / 36610
The Brighter Side of the Balkans: Humor and Satire in Balkan Literature

A. Ilieva., V. Friedman.
Spring
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

EEUR 23400
Introduction to the Musical Folklore of Central Asia

K.Arik
Crosslists: 
NEHC20765, ANTH 25905, EEUR 33400, MUSIC 23503/33503
Spring
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

This course explores the musical traditions of the peoples of Central Asia, both in terms of historical development and cultural significance. Topics include the music of the epic tradition,the use of music for healing, instrumental genres, and Central Asian folk and classical traditions. Basic field methods for ethnomusicology are also covered. Extensive use is made of recordings of musical performances and of live performances in the area.

RUSS 10100 - 10200 - 10300
First-Year Russian I, II, III

Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

SOSL 27400 / 37400
Magic Realist and Fantastic Writings from the Balkans

A. Ilieva
Crosslists: 
CMLT 22201/32201
Spring
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

In this course, we ask whether there is such a thing as a "Balkan" type of magic realism and think about the differences between the genres of magic realism and the fantastic, while reading some of the most interesting writing to have come out of the Balkans. We also look at the similarities of the works from different countries (e.g., lyricism of expression, eroticism, nostalgia) and argue for and against considering such similarities constitutive of an overall Balkan sensibility.

EEUR 29300
Philosophy of Architecture

M. Sternstein
Crosslists: 
EEUR 39300, ISHU 29302
Spring
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Readings are culled from Central and East European and Russian theoretical writings on architectur eand discussed in both an architecturally specific and broader interdisciplinary context (i.e., philosophies of technology, utopic space, psychogeographies) in this course. We read and look at primary texts and architectural executions (e.g., Karel Teige’s 1932 manifesto Minimum Dwelling).

RUSS 10400 - 10500 - 10600
Russian through Pushkin I, II, III

Prerequisites: 
Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin's shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

SOSL 29700
Reading and Research Course

Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

GEOR 22100 - 22200 - 22300 / 32100 - 32200 - 32300
Elementary Georgian

Tamra Wysocki-Niimi
Crosslists: 
EEUR 21400-21500-21600/31400-31500-31600, LGLN 22100-22200-22300
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course introduces students to Modern Georgian grammar primarily through reading exercises that relate to Georgian historical, social, and literary traditions. Supplemental activities that encourage writing, speaking, and listening skills are also included in this course.

RUSS 20100 - 20200 - 20300
Second-Year Russian I, II, III

Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

BCSN 20100 - 20200 - 20300 / 32000 - 32100 - 32200
Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I, II, III.

N. Petkovic.
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 10300 or consent of instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition toscheduled class time.

SOSL 29900
BA Paper

Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade.

GEOR 22700 - 22800 - 2290 / 32700 - 32800 - 32900
Advanced Georgian

Tamra Wysocki-Niimi
Crosslists: 
EEUR 22100-22200-22300/32100-32200-32300, LGLN 22700-22800-22900
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course emphasizes advanced language skills and vocabulary building through independent reading and writing projects as well as class exercises involving media such as newspaper and magazine articles, videoclips, radio programs, movies, and additional sound recordings and online materials.

RUSS 20400 - 20500 - 20600
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year I, II, III

Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10600
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

BCSN 29700
Reading and Research Course.

Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

SLAV 29700
Reading and Research Course

Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

RUSS 20702 - 20802 - 20902
Third-Year Russian through Culture I, II, III

V.Pichugin
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20300 (two years ofRussian) or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

BCSN 30100 - 30200 - 30300
Advanced Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I, II, III.

N. Petkovic.
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 20300 or consent of instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course is tailored to the needs of the students enrolled, depending on their concentration in the field. It enhances language acquisition with continuous reading and translation of essays, newspaper articles, literary excerpts, letters and other selected writings. Vocabulary building is emphasized by the systematic study of nominal and verbal roots, prefixes and suffixes, and word formation thereafter. Discussion follows each completed reading with a written composition assigned in relation to the topic.

SLAV 29900
BA Paper

Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Readingand Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade.

RUSS 21002 - 21102 - 21202
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story I, II, III

Prerequisites: 
Three years of Russian or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

CZEC 10100 - 10200 - 10300
Elementary Czech I, II, III.

Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research.

POLI 10100 - 10200 - 10300
Elementary Polish I, II, III

Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

RUSS 21302 - 21402 - 21502
Advanced Russian through Media I, II, III

V.Pichugin
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 21200 or consent of instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course, which is designedfor fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

CZEC 20100 - 20200 - 20300
Second-Year Czech I, II, III.

Prerequisites: 
CZEC 10300 or consent of instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.

POLI 20100 - 20200 - 20300
Second-Year Polish I, II, III

Prerequisites: 
POLI 10300 or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

RUSS 25700 / 35700
Russian Literature from Modernism to Post-Modernism

R Bird
Spring
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Given the importance of the written word in Russian culture, it is no surprise that writers were full-blooded participants in Russia's tumultuous recent history, which has lurched from war to war, and from revolution to revolution. The change of political regimes has only been outpaced by the change of aesthetic regimes, from realism to symbolism, and then from socialist realism to post-modernism. We sample the major writers, texts, and literary doctrines, paying close attention to the way they responded and contributed to historical events. This course counts as the third part of the survey of Russian literature. Texts in English.

CZEC 29700
Reading and Research Course

Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course