Courses

Subject Code

Slavic Department Listings

Course brochure

See also the list of past years' courses.

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCSN), Czech (CZEC), East European (EEUR), Georgian (GEOR),

General Slavic (SLAV), Polish (POLI), Russian (RUSS), South Slavic (SOSL)

EEUR 29201 / 39201
East European Horror Cinema

Malynne Sternstein
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Knowledge of an East European or Central European Slavic language
Crosslists: 
CMST 25521,CMST 35521
Autumn
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

Eastern Europe has menaced the "enlightened" West for centuries.  It remains to this day a valuable source for negotiating the West’s phantasies. One need only look at the rich and varied story of the vampire through popular culture from the 18th-century revenant to the 21st-century sex symbol and family man to confirm this fascination.  Eastern Europe (and I use this term here to conform to popular discourse) is the West’s necessary construct to enforce the ideation of its own health and weal.  In this course contemporary horror film produced both within and without Eastern Europe—and at times in partnership with the “West”—but all with the East as haunt, landscape, and affect are discussed with the West’s and East’s anxieties (social, political, artistic) in mind.  Films include Eli Roth’s Hostel franchise, Julie Delpy’s The Countess, Timur Bekmambetov’s Night Watch and Day Watch, Pavel Ruminov’s Dead Daughters, Nacho Cerdà’s The Abandoned, György Palfi’s Taxidermia, and the highly controversial A Serbian Film directed by Srđan Spasojević.  Readings range from work on defining the horror genre to philosophies of anxiety to critical interrogations of specific films.  This class contains films with scenes that ought to be disturbing.

Course: TR 12-1:20 pm in Cobb 425
Screening: W 7-9 pm in Cobb 425

EEUR 20900 / 30900
Structure of Albanian

V. Friedman
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LING 29701/39701
Spring
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

This is a rare opportunity to get a functional grasp of one of the least-studied national languages of Europe. Albanian is of relevance for Indo-Europeanists, Balkanists, Classicists, Islamicists, and any social scientist with an interest in Southeastern Europe. In addition to being the majority language in Albania and Kosovo, it is spoken by compact populations in all their neighboring countries, as well as by old enclaves in Italy, Croatia, Bulgaria, Turkey, Romania, and Ukraine, and by more recent émigré groups in Western Europe, North America, and Australia. The course focuses on giving students an understanding of the grammatical structure of Albanian as well as sufficient reading knowledge for the independent development of the ability to pursue research.

EEUR 21000 / 31000
Romani Language and Linguistics

V. Friedman
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LING 27810/37810, ANTH 27700/47900
Spring
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

An introduction to the language of the Roms (Gypsies).  The course will be based on the Arli diealect currently in official use in the Republic of Macedonia, but due attention will be given to other dialects of Europe and the United States.  The course will begin with an introduction to Romani linguistic history followed by an outline of Romani grammar based on Macedonian Arli.  This will serve as the basis of comparison with other dialects.  The course will include readings of authentic texts and discussion of questions of grammar,  standardization, and Romani language in society.  

EEUR 21100 - 21200 - 21300 / 31100 - 31200 - 31300
Elementary Modern Armenian I, II, III

H. Haroutunian
Crosslists: 
ARME 10101-10102-10103, LGLN10101-10102-10103
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

This three-quarter sequence utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids to enable students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet, and basic grammatical structures, as well as toachieve a reasonable level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). Considerable amounts of historical/political and social/cultural issues about Armenia are built intothis sequence to prepare students who intend to conduct research in Armenian studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

EEUR 23400
Introduction to the Musical Folklore of Central Asia

K.Arik
Crosslists: 
NEHC20765, ANTH 25905, EEUR 33400, MUSIC 23503/33503
Spring
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

This course explores the musical traditions of the peoples of Central Asia, both in terms of historical development and cultural significance. Topics include the music of the epic tradition,the use of music for healing, instrumental genres, and Central Asian folk and classical traditions. Basic field methods for ethnomusicology are also covered. Extensive use is made of recordings of musical performances and of live performances in the area.

EEUR 29300
Philosophy of Architecture

M. Sternstein
Crosslists: 
EEUR 39300, ISHU 29302
Spring
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Readings are culled from Central and East European and Russian theoretical writings on architectur eand discussed in both an architecturally specific and broader interdisciplinary context (i.e., philosophies of technology, utopic space, psychogeographies) in this course. We read and look at primary texts and architectural executions (e.g., Karel Teige’s 1932 manifesto Minimum Dwelling).