Courses

Academic Year

Slavic Department Listings

Course brochure

See also the list of past years' courses.

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCSN), Czech (CZEC), East European (EEUR), Georgian (GEOR),

General Slavic (SLAV), Polish (POLI), Russian (RUSS), South Slavic (SOSL)

BCSN 10100 / 31000
Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn
2013-2014
Language course

Knowledge of a Slavic language and background in linguistics not required. The major objective of the courseis to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

BCSN 20100 / 32000
Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian I

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 10300 or consent of instructor
Autumn
2013-2014
Language course

The first quarter isdevoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition toscheduled class time.

BCSN 29700
Reading and Research Course

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Language course

CZEC 10100
Elementary Czech I

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn
2013-2014
Language course

This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research.

CZEC 20100
Second-Year Czech I

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
CZEC 10300 or consent of instructor
Autumn
2013-2014
Language course

The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.

CZEC 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

CZEC 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a qu
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

SLAV 24550
Central Asian Cinema

Robert Bird
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
CMST 10100 Introduction to Film or consent of instructor.
Crosslists: 
CMST 34550,CMST 24550
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

Nowhere has the advent of modernity been more closely entwined with cinema than in Central Asia, a contested entity which for our purposes stretches from Turkey in the West to Kyrgyzstan in the East, though our emphasis will be squarely on Soviet and post-Soviet Central Asia (especially Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan). This course will trace the encounter with cinematic modernity through the analysis of individual films by major directors, including (but not limited to) Shukhrat Abbasov, Melis Ubukeev, Ali Khamraev, Tolomush Okeev, Sergei Paradzhanov, Gulshad Omarova. In addition to situating the films in their cultural and historical situations, close attention will be paid to the sources of Central Asian cinema in cinemas both adjacent and distant; to the ways in which cinema enables a distinct encounter with modernity; and to the cinematic construction of Central Asia as a cultural entity.

SLAV 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

SLAV 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality gra
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

POLI 10100
Elementary Polish I

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn
2013-2014
Language course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g., communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students’ native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

POLI 20100
Second-Year Polish I

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
POLI 10300 or equivalent.
Autumn
2013-2014
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

POLI 20500 / 30100
Advanced Polish I

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
POLI 20300 or equivalent.
Autumn
2013-2014
Language course

Students in this course discuss selected readings (primarily short stories chosen by the instructor) in Polish during the week. The level of work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. All work in Polish.

POLI 25301 / 35301
Gombrowicz: The Writer as Philosopher

Bozena Shallcross
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
ISHU 29405,FNDL 26903
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

In this course, we dwell on Witold Gombrowicz the philosopher, exploring the components of his authorial style and concepts that substantiate his claim to both the literary and the philosophical spheres. Entangled in an ongoing battle with basic philosophical tenets and, indeed, with existence itself, this erudite Polish author is a prime example of a 20th century modernist whose philosophical novels explode with uncanny laughter. In contrast to many of his contemporaries, who established their reputations as writers/philosophers, Gombrowicz applied distinctly literary models to the same questions that they explored. We investigate these models in depth, as we focus on Gombrowicz’s novels, philosophical lectures, and some of his autobiographical writings. With an insight from recent criticism of these primary texts, we seek answers to the more general question: What makes this author a philosopher?

POLI 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

29900
BA Paper

Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Open only to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature. Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a q
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 10100
First-Year Russian I

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
2013-2014
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

RUSS 10400
Russian through Pushkin I

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin’s shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20100
Second-Year Russian I

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor
Autumn
2013-2014
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20400
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year I

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10600
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20702
Third-Year Russian through Culture I

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20300 (two years of Russian) or equivalent
Autumn
2013-2014
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21002
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story I

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Three years of Russian or equivalent
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21302 / 30102
Advanced Russian through Media I

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 21002 or consent of instructor
Autumn
2013-2014
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 23900
Lolita

Malynne Sternstein
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 25300, ENGL 28916
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

“Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul, Lolita: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate, to tap at three on the teeth.” Popular as Nabokov’s “all-American” novel is, it is rarely discussed beyond its psychosexual profile. This intensive text-centered and discussion-based course attempts to supersede the univocal obsession with the novel’s pedophiliac plot as such by concerning itself above all with the novel’s language: language as failure, as mania, and as conjuration.

RUSS 24101 / 34101
Pushkin and His Age

Lina Steiner
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course approaches the Golden Age of Russian culture through the prism of the artistic and intellectual legacy of its most influential writer. We read and analyze Pushkin’s poetry, prose fiction, essays, and critical works in the context of the critical, philosophical, and political debates of his time. We also consider writers such as Rousseau, Montesquieu, Karamzin, Balzac, Chaadaev, and Belinsky. Texts in English or the original; classes conducted in English.

RUSS 25100
Introduction to Russian Civilization I

F. Hillis, M. Merritt
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not offered in 2014-15.
Crosslists: 
HIST 13900,SOSC 24000
Autumn
2013-2014

This two-quarter sequence provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Russian civilization. The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1880s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include: the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual, and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence is offered in alternate years.

RUSS 25500 / 35500
Russian Literature from Classicism to Romanticism

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Two years of Russian language
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course offers a survey of the main literary movements, schools, and genres during the period from the 1760s to the 1830s. We will explore the main works of Russian new-classical, pre-romantic, and romantic authors, including Mikhail Lomonossov, Gavriil Derzhavin, Denis Fonvizin, Nikolai Novikov, Anns Labzina, Nikolai Karamzin, Aleksandr Radischev, Vassilii Pushkin, Denis Davydov, Vassilii Zhukovskii, Alexandr Pushkin, Mikhail Lermontov, and Vladimir Odoevskii. Most texts are available in Russian as well as in translation. However, students are encouraged to read all texts in Russian.

RUSS 26105
Solzhenitsyn

Robert Bird
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 26105
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

Nobel Laureate in Literature in 1970, Alexander Solzhenitsyn (1918–2008) is best known as an advocate for human rights in the Soviet Union, from which he was expelled in 1974. As with Tolstoy a century before, Solzhenitsyn’s vast moral authority rested upon the reputation he gained as a novelist in the early 1960s. We will read his novels One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich and Cancer Ward as innovative and complex fictions in the tradition of the Russian novel. We will then read the first volume of his monumental Archipelago GULAG, which he called “an experiment in literary investigation,” to see how he brought his artistic talents to bear on the hidden and traumatic history of repression under Stalin. At the center of the course will be the tensions in Solzhenitsyn’s work between fiction and history, individual and society, modernity and tradition, humanism and ideology.

RUSS 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a qua
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 34802
Faith, Doubt and Secularization in 19th-Century Russia

Lina Steiner
Course level: 
Graduate
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

SOSL 27200 / 37200
Returning the Gaze: The Balkans and Western Europe

Angelina Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23201,CMLT 33201,NEHC 20885,NEHC 30885
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

The Other Within the Self: Identity in Balkan Literature and Film. This two-course sequence examines discursive practices in a number of literary and cinematic works from the South East corner of Europe through which identities in the region become defined by two distinct others: the “barbaric, demonic” Ottoman and the “civilized” Western European.

This course investigates the complex relationship between South East European self-representations and the imagined Western "gaze" for whose benefit the nations stage their quest for identity and their aspirations for recognition. We also think about differing models of masculinity, the figure of the gypsy as a metaphor for the national self in relation to the West, and the myths Balkans tell about themselves. We conclude by considering the role that the imperative to belong to Western Europe played in the Yugoslav wars of succession. Some possible texts/films are Ivo Andric, Bosnian Chronicle; Aleko Konstantinov, Baj Ganyo; Emir Kusturica, Underground; and Milcho Manchevski, Before the Rain.

SOSL 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

SOSL 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a qua
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course