Courses

Subject Code

Academic Year

Slavic Department Listings

Course brochure

See also the list of past years' courses.

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCSN), Czech (CZEC), East European (EEUR), Georgian (GEOR),

General Slavic (SLAV), Polish (POLI), Russian (RUSS), South Slavic (SOSL)

RUSS 10200
First-Year Russian II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

RUSS 10500
Russian through Pushkin II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin’s shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20200
Second-Year Russian II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor
Winter
2013-2014
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20500
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20802
Third-Year Russian through Culture II

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21102
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21402 / 30202
Advanced Russian through Media II

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 25200
Introduction to Russian Civilization II

R. Bird, W. Nickell
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not offered 2014-15.
Crosslists: 
HIST 14000,SOSC 24100
Winter
2013-2014

This two-quarter sequence provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Russian civilization. The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1880s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include: the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual, and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence is offered in alternate years.

RUSS 25600 / 35600
Realism in Russia

Lina Steiner
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

From the 1830s to the 1890s, most Russian prose writers and playwrights were either engaged in the European-wide cultural movement known as "realistic school" which set for itself the task of engaging with social processes from the standpoint of political ideologies. The ultimate goal of this course is to distill more precise meanings of "realism," "critical realism,"and "naturalism" in nineteenth-century Russian through analysis of works by Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Aleksandr Ostrovsky, Goncharov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, and Kuprin. Texts in English and the original. Optional Russian-intensive section offered.

RUSS 26205 / 36205
Soviet Everyday Life

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a qua
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 34504
Russian Poetry from Blok to Pasternak

R. Bird, B. Maslov
Course level: 
Graduate
Prerequisites: 
Knowledge of Russian required.
Crosslists: 
CMLT 34504
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

We will survey the selected poetry of major Russian modernists from 1900 to 1935, including lyrical and narrative genres. Poets covered include: Aleksandr Blok, Andrei Belyi, Viacheslav Ivanov, Nikolai Gumilev, Osip Mandel’shtam, Anna Akhmatova, Velimir Khlebnikov, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Marina Tsvetaeva, Boris Pasternak. In addition to tracing the development of poetic doctrines (from symbolism through acmeism and futurism), we will investigate the close correlations between formal innovation and the changing semantics of Russian poetry. Attention will also be paid to contemporary developments in Western European poetry. Knowledge of Russian required.

RUSS 24409
The Progress of History in Film: Modes of Historical Realism in Soviet Cinema

Zdenko Mandusic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
NOTE: Course will be taught TR 3-4:20; film screenings on F 3-6:00 (updated 11/14/13)
Crosslists: 
CMST 24520
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

How did Soviets see themselves in history? How was Soviet progress through history visually represented? Did modes of representing history in film change over time? This course will interrogate the tensions between different styles of visual and narrative representation of history and how these tensions arise from the methods and ideological implications of representing historical reality in Soviet cinema. The corpus of films for this course aims to represent a diachronic survey of Soviet cinema and its treatment of history and realism. Screenings will be supplemented with primary and secondary literature covering the first two thirds of Russian history of the twentieth century. The selected films and readings are organized to investigate how films structure the perception of history and reality in the context of the Soviet Union. We want to ask what are the aesthetic and political implications of films made between the mid-1920s and the early 1970s? How did these films represent the revolutionary history and the revolutionary present? How were they shaped by political circumstances? What is the connection between aesthetic transitions and social and political changes in Soviet culture?

We will begin with films made in the aftermath of the October Revolution, investigating how political demands and practical necessities combined to shape drastic developments in film style and the treatment of history and reality. After the revolutionary Avant-Garde films of the 1920s, we shall scrutinize the impact of Stalinism on Soviet film style. The trajectory of the course will then lead us to conclude with films of the Thaw, the period of cultural and political liberalization that followed the death of Stalin. As we move through these periods of Soviet history, we will consider how political limits, stylistic conditions, and industry developments shaped the content and form of Soviet cinema from the October Revolution to the Post-Stalinist period. As we investigate these cultural and political contexts, we also want to delineate the connections between different definitions of what Soviet cinema was supposed to be. This investigation will be based on theories regarding the film medium and will involve considering how different filmmakers emphasized particular properties of the medium.