Courses

Academic Year

Slavic Department Listings

Course brochure

See also the list of past years' courses.

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCSN), Czech (CZEC), East European (EEUR), Georgian (GEOR),

General Slavic (SLAV), Polish (POLI), Russian (RUSS), South Slavic (SOSL)

BCSN 10200 / 31100
Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 10100 or consent of instructor.
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

The major objective of the courseis to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

BCSN 20200 / 32100
Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian II

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 20100 or consent of instructor.
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

29700
Reading and Research Course

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2014-2015
Language course

CZEC 10200
Elementary Czech II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
CZEC 10100 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research.

CZEC 20200
Second-Year Czech II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
CZEC 20100 or consent of instructor.
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.

CZEC 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

CZEC 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of Instructor and Dept. Advisor; College Reading & research form required; Enter section from faculty list
Autumn Spring Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

POLI 10200
Elementary Polish II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
POLI 10100 or consent of instructor
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

POLI 20200
Second-Year Polish II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

POLI 20600 / 30200
Advanced Polish II

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

Students in this course discuss selected readings (primarily short stories chosen by the instructor) in Polish during the week. The level of work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. All work in Polish.

RUSS 10200
First-Year Russian II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

RUSS 20200
Second-Year Russian II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20500
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20802
Third-Year Russian through Culture II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21102
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21402 / 30202
Advanced Russian through Media II

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 25600 / 35600
Realism in Russia

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

From the 1830s to the 1890s, most Russian prose writers and playwrights were either engaged in the European-wide cultural movement known as "realistic school" which set for itself the task of engaging with social processes from the standpoint of political ideologies. The ultimate goal of this course is to distill more precise meanings of "realism," "critical realism,"and "naturalism" in nineteenth-century Russian through analysis of works by Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Aleksandr Ostrovsky, Goncharov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, and Kuprin. Texts in English and the original. Optional Russian-intensive section offered.

GEOR 21700 / 31700
Introduction to Georgian History and Culture

T. Wysocki-Niimi
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
HIST 24004
Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

This one-quarter course will provide students with a rare opportunity to learn more about the history of the Republic of Georgia and its culture through a selection of literature and poetry (in translation), films, lectures, and class discussions and activities. We will survey Georgian history from its prehistory through its Golden Age in the 12th century up to the present day. Discussions relating to Georgian culture will include music, art (including metalwork and cloisonné), traditional dance, religious and pagan practices, and Georgia’s wine and toasting culture. Throughout the course we will consider issues of Georgian identity and nationhood, especially in relation to influences from surrounding regions.

GEOR 22200 / 32200
Elementary Georgian-2

T. Wysocki-Niimi
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LGLN 22200,LGLN 32200
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course introduces students to Modern Georgian grammar primarily through reading exercises that relate to Georgian historical, social, and literary traditions. Supplemental activities that encourage writing, speaking, and listening skills are also included in this course.

GEOR 22500 / 32500
Intermediate Georgian-2

T. Wysocki-Niimi
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LGLN 22500,LGLN 32500
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course emphasizes advanced language skills and vocabulary building through independent reading and writing projects as well as class exercises involving media such as newspaper and magazine articles, videoclips, radio programs, movies, and additional sound recordings and online materials.

GEOR 22800 / 32800
Advanced Georgian-2

T. Wysocki-Niimi
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LGLN 22800, LGLN 32800
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This three-quarter course emphasizes advanced language skills and vocabulary building through independent reading and writing projects as well as class exercises involving media such as newspaper and magazine articles, video clips, radio programs, movies, and additional authentic recordings and online materials.

SOSL 26800 / 36800
Balkan Folklore

A. Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
NEHC 20568,NEHC 30568,CMLT 23301,CMLT 33301,ANTH 25908,ANTH 35908
Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

Immerse yourself in the magic world of vampires and dragons, bagpipes and uneven beats, quick-step circle dance. This course give an introduction to Balkan folklore from anthropological, historical/political, and performative perspectives. We become acquainted with folk tales, lyric and epic songs, music, and dance. The work of Milman Parry and Albert Lord, who developed their theory of oral composition through work among epic singers in the Balkans, helps us understand folk tradition as a dynamic process – how is oral tradition transmitted, preserved, changed, forgotten? how do illiterate singers learn their long narrative poems, how do musicians learn to play? We consider the function of different folklore genres in the imagining and maintenance of community and the socialization of the individual. The historical/political part will survey the emergence of folklore studies as a discipline as well as the ways it has served in the formation and propagation of the nation in the Balkans. The class will also experience this living tradition first hand through our in-class workshop with the Chicago based dance ensemble “Balkanski igri.” The Annual Balkan Folklore Spring Festival will be held in March at the International House.

SOSL 27300 / 37300
The Burden of History: The Nation and Its Lost Paradise

A. Ilieva
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23401,CMLT 33401,NEHC 20573,NEHC 30573,HIST 24005,HIST 34005
Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

The Other Within the Self: Identity in Balkan Literature and Film. This two-course sequence examines discursive practices in a number of literary and cinematic works from the South East corner of Europe through which identities in the region become defined by two distinct others: the “barbaric, demonic” Ottoman and the “civilized” Western European.

This course begins by defining the nation both historically and conceptually, with attention to Romantic nationalism and its flourishing in Southeastern Europe. We then look at the narrative of original wholeness, loss, and redemption through which Balkan countries retell their Ottoman past. With the help of Freud's analysis of masochistic desire and Žižek's theory of the subject as constituted by trauma, we contemplate the national fixation on the trauma of loss and the dynamic between victimhood and sublimity. The figure of the Janissary highlights the significance of the other in the definition of the self. Some possible texts are Petar Njegoš's Mountain Wreath; Ismail Kadare's The Castle; and Anton Donchev's Time of Parting.

POLI 29500 / 39500
The Holocaust Object

Bozena Shallcross
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
JWSC 29500, ANTH 23910, ANTH 35035
Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

In this course we explore various ontological and representational modes of the Holocaust material object world as it was represented during WWII. Then, we interrogate the post-Holocaust artifacts and material remnants, as they are displayed, curated, controlled, and narrated in the memorial sites and museums of former ghettos, extermination and concentration camps. These sites which – once the locations of genocide – are now places of remembrance, the (post)human, and material remnants, also serve educational purposes. Therefore, we study the ways in which this material world, ranging from infrastructure to detritus, has been subjected to two, often conflicting, tasks of representation and preservation, which we view through a prism of authenticity. In order to study representation, we critically engage a textual and visual reading of museum narrations and fiction writings; to tackle with demands of preservation we apply a neo-materialist approach. Of special interest are survivors’ testimonies as appended to the artifacts they donated. The course will also equip you with salient critical tools for future creative research in the Holocaust studies.

24501
Forms of Lyric from Classical Antiquity to Postmodernism

Boris Maslov
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 24501, CLCV 27109
Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

Moving beyond the modern perception of lyric as an expression of the poet’s subjectivity, this course confronts the remarkable longevity of varieties of lyric that have remained in use over centuries and millennia, such as the hymn, ode, pastoral, elegy, epistle, and epigram. What kept these classical genres alive for so long and, conversely, what made them serviceable to poets working in very different cultural milieus? In an effort to develop a theory and a history of Western lyric genres, we will sample from the work of many poets, including Sappho, Horace, Ovid, Hölderlin, Pushkin, Whitman, Mandel’shtam, Brodsky, and Milosz. All readings in English.

RUSS 28805 / 38805
Russia, Modernity and the Everyday

Susanne Cohen
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
ANTH 21805, ANTH 31825
Winter
2014-2015

The question of modernity has long been a central preoccupation in Russia.  On the one hand, the early Soviet project was designed to conjure into being a new society marked by a distinctly socialist version of modernity.  On the other hand, the collapse of the Soviet state in effect delegitimized a particular understanding of what it meant to be modern:  Becoming post-Soviet meant not only the loss of a once promised radiant future, but often felt like a bewildering regression.  This course explores what modernity has meant for ordinary people living in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia, viewing the modern not as an objective break from “tradition,” but as a touchstone for orienting selves, practices, and understandings.  We will focus particularly on everyday life, which served as a primary target of early Soviet change efforts, a wearying reminder of the distance between utopian promises and actually existing socialism, and, in the post-Soviet era, a battleground for establishing new teleologies and new futures amid what could now triumphantly be called truly “global” capitalism.  More generally, readings in social history and the anthropology of postsocialism will provide groundwork for understanding the dramatic social transformations that have occurred in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia and the complex ways in which people have attempted to orient themselves and their everyday practices in shifting trajectories, temporalities, and directionalities.  While Russia will be our focus, we will also draw several cases from elsewhere in the former Soviet bloc with the dual aims of learning from other socialist and postsocialist experiences and exploring the considerable impact of Soviet and Russian modernizing projects on the surrounding region in the socialist period and beyond.

SLAV 20100 / 30100
Intro to Slavic Linguistics

Y. Gorbachov
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
LING 26400, LING 36400
Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

The main goal of this course isto familiarize students with the essential facts of the Slavic linguistic history and with the most characteristic features of the modern Slaviclanguages. In order to understand the development of Proto-Slavic into theexisting Slavic languages and dialects, we focus on a set of basic phenomena. The course is specifically concerned with making students aware of factors that led to the breakup of the Slavic unity and the emergence of the individual languages. Drawing on the historical development, we touch upon such salient typological characteristics of the modern languages such as the rich set of morphophonemic alternations, aspect, free word order, and agreement.