Courses

Subject Code

Slavic Department Listings

Course brochure

See also the list of past years' courses.

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCSN), Czech (CZEC), East European (EEUR), Georgian (GEOR),

General Slavic (SLAV), Polish (POLI), Russian (RUSS), South Slavic (SOSL)

RUSS 10203
First-Year Russian-2

Erik Houle (1); Maria Iakubovich (2); Mark Baugher (3)
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2019-2020
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This year-long course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20203
Second-Year Russian II

Erik Houle (1); Mark Baugher (2)
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2019-2020
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20802
Third-Year Russian through Culture II

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2019-2020
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21402 / 30202
Advanced Russian through Media II

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
2019-2020
Language course

This is a three-quarter sequence designed for fourth- and fifth-year students of Russian. It is also suitable for native speakers of Russian. This sequence covers various aspects of advanced Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. This sequence emphasizes the four communicative skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing in a culturally authentic context. It builds transcultural competence by expanding students' knowledge of the language, culture, history, and daily lives of the Russian-speaking people. Vocabulary building is strongly emphasized. We add to the existing skills and develop our abilities to analyze increasingly complex texts for their meaning: to identify various styles and registers of the Russian language and to provide their neutral equivalents in standard Russian. We also work on developing our abilities to paraphrase, narrate, describe, support opinions, hypothesize, discuss abstract topics, and handle linguistically unfamiliar situations (in spoken and written format). Classes conducted in Russian. Course-specific grammar issues are covered during drill sessions (weekly) and office hours (by appointment). Oral Proficiency Interviews are conducted in the beginning and the end of the course (Autumn and Spring Quarters). Prerequisite(s): Four years of Russian, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

RUSS 10500
Russian Through Puskin-2

Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20103 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Winter
2018-2019
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20203
Second-Year Russian-2

Erik Houle
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20103 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Winter
2018-2019

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20802
Third Year Russ: Culture-2

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20701 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions ot be arranged.
Winter
2018-2019
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21402 / 30202
Adv Russian Through Media-2

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 21302 or consent of instructor; drill sessions to be arranged
Winter
2018-2019
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 10203
First-Year Russian-2

Erik Houle; Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
Russian 10103 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Winter
2018-2019
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All five major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening, comprehension, and speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 10103 - 10203 - 10303
First Year Russian I, II, III

Erik Houle, Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research.  All five major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening, comprehension, and speaking) are stressed.  Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions.  This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries.  Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20103 - 20203 - 20303
Second Year Russian I, II, III

Erik Houle, Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10103, 10203, 10303 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension.  Systematic study of word formation and other strategics are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating.  Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background.  Conversation practices is held twice a week.

RUSS 20702 - 20802 - 20902
Third Year Russian Culture I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20103, 20203, 20303 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions ot be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21302 - 21402 - 21502 / 30102 - 30202 - 30302
Advanced Russian Through Media I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20702, 20802, 20902 or consent of instructor; drill sessions to be arranged.
Crosslists: 
REES 21502 (Spring), REES 30302 (Spring)
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 29910 - 29911 - 29912 / 39910 - 39911 - 39912
Special Topics in Advanced Russian I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 21302/30102, 21402/30202, 21502/30302 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

Must complete Advanced Russian through Media or equivalent, or obtain consent of instructor. Class meets for 2 hours each week.  We'll work with several topics, all of them are relevant to the general theme of "Geography and Worldview: Russian Perspective". There will be maps, reading materials, several documentaries, clips from TV programs and other media, and feature films. Class meetings will be a combination of group discussions, short presentations, and lectures. Final - one term paper at the end (in English) based on Russian materials.

RUSS 10103 - 10203 - 10303
First Year Russian I, II, III

Erik Houle, Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20103 - 20203 - 20303
Second Year Russian I, II, III

Erik Houle, Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10103, 10203, 10303 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20702 - 20802 - 20902
Third Year Russian Culture I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20103, 20203, 20303 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions ot be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21302 - 21402 - 21502 / 30102 - 30202 - 30302
Advanced Russian Through Media I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20702, 20802, 20902 or consent of instructor; drill sessions to be arranged.
Crosslists: 
REES 21502 (Spring), REES 30302 (Spring)
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21302 - 21402 - 21502 / 30102 - 30202 - 30302
Advanced Russian Through Media I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
PQ: RUSS 21202 or Consent of Instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

RUSS 10103 - 10203 - 10303
First-Year Russian I, II, III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

RUSS 10103 - 10203 - 10303
Second-Year Russian I, II, III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
PQ: Russ 10300 or Consent of Instructor, Drill Sessions to be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

RUSS 20702 - 20802 - 20902
Third-Year Russian: Culture I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
PQ: RUSS 20300 or Consent of Instructor
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

RUSS 21002 - 21102 - 21202
Fourth-Year Russian: Short Story I, II, III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
PQ: RUSS 20902 or Consent of Instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

RUSS 20500
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20802
Third-Year Russian through Culture II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21102
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21402 / 30202
Advanced Russian through Media II

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 25600 / 35600
Realism in Russia

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

From the 1830s to the 1890s, most Russian prose writers and playwrights were either engaged in the European-wide cultural movement known as "realistic school" which set for itself the task of engaging with social processes from the standpoint of political ideologies. The ultimate goal of this course is to distill more precise meanings of "realism," "critical realism,"and "naturalism" in nineteenth-century Russian through analysis of works by Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Aleksandr Ostrovsky, Goncharov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, and Kuprin. Texts in English and the original. Optional Russian-intensive section offered.

RUSS 28805 / 38805
Russia, Modernity and the Everyday

Susanne Cohen
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
ANTH 21805, ANTH 31825
Winter
2014-2015

The question of modernity has long been a central preoccupation in Russia.  On the one hand, the early Soviet project was designed to conjure into being a new society marked by a distinctly socialist version of modernity.  On the other hand, the collapse of the Soviet state in effect delegitimized a particular understanding of what it meant to be modern:  Becoming post-Soviet meant not only the loss of a once promised radiant future, but often felt like a bewildering regression.  This course explores what modernity has meant for ordinary people living in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia, viewing the modern not as an objective break from “tradition,” but as a touchstone for orienting selves, practices, and understandings.  We will focus particularly on everyday life, which served as a primary target of early Soviet change efforts, a wearying reminder of the distance between utopian promises and actually existing socialism, and, in the post-Soviet era, a battleground for establishing new teleologies and new futures amid what could now triumphantly be called truly “global” capitalism.  More generally, readings in social history and the anthropology of postsocialism will provide groundwork for understanding the dramatic social transformations that have occurred in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia and the complex ways in which people have attempted to orient themselves and their everyday practices in shifting trajectories, temporalities, and directionalities.  While Russia will be our focus, we will also draw several cases from elsewhere in the former Soviet bloc with the dual aims of learning from other socialist and postsocialist experiences and exploring the considerable impact of Soviet and Russian modernizing projects on the surrounding region in the socialist period and beyond.

RUSS 10200
First-Year Russian II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

RUSS 20200
Second-Year Russian II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21102
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21402 / 30202
Advanced Russian through Media II

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 25200
Introduction to Russian Civilization II

R. Bird, W. Nickell
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not offered 2014-15.
Crosslists: 
HIST 14000,SOSC 24100
Winter
2013-2014

This two-quarter sequence provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Russian civilization. The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1880s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include: the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual, and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence is offered in alternate years.

RUSS 25600 / 35600
Realism in Russia

Lina Steiner
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

From the 1830s to the 1890s, most Russian prose writers and playwrights were either engaged in the European-wide cultural movement known as "realistic school" which set for itself the task of engaging with social processes from the standpoint of political ideologies. The ultimate goal of this course is to distill more precise meanings of "realism," "critical realism,"and "naturalism" in nineteenth-century Russian through analysis of works by Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Aleksandr Ostrovsky, Goncharov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, and Kuprin. Texts in English and the original. Optional Russian-intensive section offered.

RUSS 26205 / 36205
Soviet Everyday Life

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 10200
First-Year Russian II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

RUSS 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a qua
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 10500
Russian through Pushkin II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin’s shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 34504
Russian Poetry from Blok to Pasternak

R. Bird, B. Maslov
Course level: 
Graduate
Prerequisites: 
Knowledge of Russian required.
Crosslists: 
CMLT 34504
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

We will survey the selected poetry of major Russian modernists from 1900 to 1935, including lyrical and narrative genres. Poets covered include: Aleksandr Blok, Andrei Belyi, Viacheslav Ivanov, Nikolai Gumilev, Osip Mandel’shtam, Anna Akhmatova, Velimir Khlebnikov, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Marina Tsvetaeva, Boris Pasternak. In addition to tracing the development of poetic doctrines (from symbolism through acmeism and futurism), we will investigate the close correlations between formal innovation and the changing semantics of Russian poetry. Attention will also be paid to contemporary developments in Western European poetry. Knowledge of Russian required.

RUSS 20200
Second-Year Russian II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor
Winter
2013-2014
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 24409
The Progress of History in Film: Modes of Historical Realism in Soviet Cinema

Zdenko Mandusic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
NOTE: Course will be taught TR 3-4:20; film screenings on F 3-6:00 (updated 11/14/13)
Crosslists: 
CMST 24520
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

How did Soviets see themselves in history? How was Soviet progress through history visually represented? Did modes of representing history in film change over time? This course will interrogate the tensions between different styles of visual and narrative representation of history and how these tensions arise from the methods and ideological implications of representing historical reality in Soviet cinema. The corpus of films for this course aims to represent a diachronic survey of Soviet cinema and its treatment of history and realism. Screenings will be supplemented with primary and secondary literature covering the first two thirds of Russian history of the twentieth century. The selected films and readings are organized to investigate how films structure the perception of history and reality in the context of the Soviet Union. We want to ask what are the aesthetic and political implications of films made between the mid-1920s and the early 1970s? How did these films represent the revolutionary history and the revolutionary present? How were they shaped by political circumstances? What is the connection between aesthetic transitions and social and political changes in Soviet culture?

We will begin with films made in the aftermath of the October Revolution, investigating how political demands and practical necessities combined to shape drastic developments in film style and the treatment of history and reality. After the revolutionary Avant-Garde films of the 1920s, we shall scrutinize the impact of Stalinism on Soviet film style. The trajectory of the course will then lead us to conclude with films of the Thaw, the period of cultural and political liberalization that followed the death of Stalin. As we move through these periods of Soviet history, we will consider how political limits, stylistic conditions, and industry developments shaped the content and form of Soviet cinema from the October Revolution to the Post-Stalinist period. As we investigate these cultural and political contexts, we also want to delineate the connections between different definitions of what Soviet cinema was supposed to be. This investigation will be based on theories regarding the film medium and will involve considering how different filmmakers emphasized particular properties of the medium. 

RUSS 20500
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20802
Third-Year Russian through Culture II

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21302 - 21402 - 21502
Advanced Russian through Media I, II, III

V.Pichugin
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 21200 or consent of instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course, which is designedfor fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 25600 / 35600
Realism in Russia

W. Nickell
Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

From the 1830s to the 1890s, most Russian prose writers and playwrights were either engaged in the European-wide cultural movement known as "realistic school," which set for itself the task of engaging with social processes from the standpoint of political ideologies. The ultimate goal of this course is to distill more precise meanings of "realism," "critical realism," and"naturalism" in nineteenth-century Russian through analysis of worksby Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Aleksandr Ostrovsky, Goncharov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, and Kuprin. Texts in English and the original. Optional Russian-intensive section offered.

RUSS 29600
Pale Fire

M. Sternstein
Crosslists: 
FNDL 25311
Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 29700
Reading and Research Course

Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

RUSS 29900
BA Paper

Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade.

RUSS 10100 - 10200 - 10300
First-Year Russian I, II, III

Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 23501 / 33501
Bakhtin and Lotman: from Polyphony to Semiosphere

L. Steiner
Prerequisites: 
There are no prerequisites for this course.
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23502/33502
Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

This seminar will focus on major works by the Russian philosopher, philologist and literary theorist Mikhail Bakhtin (1895-1975), including his early philosophical work Author and Hero in Aesthetic Activity, his essays on Speech genres and the Bildungsroman, as well as his books Rabelais and His World and Problems of Dostoevsky's Poetics. We will also read contemporary scholarly studies devoted to Bakhtin and his circle (Clark&Holquist, Morson&Emerson, Tihanov etc.) In the last two weeks of the seminar we will turn to Yurii Lotman, examining his works on semiotics of culture as an original approach to literary theory and semiotics as well as a response to Bakhtin. The course is open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students. All texts are in English. Discussion and final papers are in English.

RUSS 10400 - 10500 - 10600
Russian through Pushkin I, II, III

Prerequisites: 
Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin's shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20100 - 20200 - 20300
Second-Year Russian I, II, III

Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20400 - 20500 - 20600
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year I, II, III

Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10600
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20702 - 20802 - 20902
Third-Year Russian through Culture I, II, III

V.Pichugin
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20300 (two years ofRussian) or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21002 - 21102 - 21202
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story I, II, III

Prerequisites: 
Three years of Russian or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.