Courses

Subject Code

Slavic Department Listings

Course brochure

See also the list of past years' courses.

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCSN), Czech (CZEC), East European (EEUR), Georgian (GEOR),

General Slavic (SLAV), Polish (POLI), Russian (RUSS), South Slavic (SOSL)

RUSS 10103
First-Year Russian-1

Erik Houle (1); Maria Iakubovich (2); Mark Baugher (3)
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
2019-2020
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This year-long course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20103
Second-Year Russian I

Erik Houle (1); Mark Baugher (2)
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
2019-2020
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20702
Third-Year Russian through Culture I

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
2019-2020
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21302 / 30102
Advanced Russian through Media I

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn
2019-2020
Language course

This is a three-quarter sequence designed for fourth- and fifth-year students of Russian. It is also suitable for native speakers of Russian. This sequence covers various aspects of advanced Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. This sequence emphasizes the four communicative skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing in a culturally authentic context. It builds transcultural competence by expanding students' knowledge of the language, culture, history, and daily lives of the Russian-speaking people. Vocabulary building is strongly emphasized. We add to the existing skills and develop our abilities to analyze increasingly complex texts for their meaning: to identify various styles and registers of the Russian language and to provide their neutral equivalents in standard Russian. We also work on developing our abilities to paraphrase, narrate, describe, support opinions, hypothesize, discuss abstract topics, and handle linguistically unfamiliar situations (in spoken and written format). Classes conducted in Russian. Course-specific grammar issues are covered during drill sessions (weekly) and office hours (by appointment). Oral Proficiency Interviews are conducted in the beginning and the end of the course (Autumn and Spring Quarters). Prerequisite(s): Four years of Russian, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

RUSS 21600
Russian For Heritage Learners

Maria Iakubovich
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
2019-2020
Language course

This course examines the major aspects of Russian grammar and stylistics essential for heritage learners. Students engage in close readings and discussions of short stories by classic and contemporary Russian authors (e.g., Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Platonov, Bulgakov, Erofeev, Tolstaya), with special emphasis on their linguistic and stylistic differences. All work in Russian.

RUSS 29910 / 39910
Special Topics in Advanced Russian

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn
2019-2020
Language course

Must complete Advanced Russian through Media or equivalent, or obtain consent of instructor. Class meets for 2 hours each week. We'll work with several topics, all of them are relevant to the general theme of "Geography and Worldview: Russian Perspective". There will be maps, reading materials, several documentaries, clips from TV programs and other media, and feature films. Class meetings will be a combination of group discussions, short presentations, and lectures. Final - one term paper at the end (in English) based on Russian materials.

RUSS 10203
First-Year Russian-2

Erik Houle (1); Maria Iakubovich (2); Mark Baugher (3)
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2019-2020
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This year-long course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20203
Second-Year Russian II

Erik Houle (1); Mark Baugher (2)
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2019-2020
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20802
Third-Year Russian through Culture II

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2019-2020
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21402 / 30202
Advanced Russian through Media II

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
2019-2020
Language course

This is a three-quarter sequence designed for fourth- and fifth-year students of Russian. It is also suitable for native speakers of Russian. This sequence covers various aspects of advanced Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. This sequence emphasizes the four communicative skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing in a culturally authentic context. It builds transcultural competence by expanding students' knowledge of the language, culture, history, and daily lives of the Russian-speaking people. Vocabulary building is strongly emphasized. We add to the existing skills and develop our abilities to analyze increasingly complex texts for their meaning: to identify various styles and registers of the Russian language and to provide their neutral equivalents in standard Russian. We also work on developing our abilities to paraphrase, narrate, describe, support opinions, hypothesize, discuss abstract topics, and handle linguistically unfamiliar situations (in spoken and written format). Classes conducted in Russian. Course-specific grammar issues are covered during drill sessions (weekly) and office hours (by appointment). Oral Proficiency Interviews are conducted in the beginning and the end of the course (Autumn and Spring Quarters). Prerequisite(s): Four years of Russian, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

RUSS 10303
First-Year Russian-3

Erik Houle (1); Maria Iakubovich (2); Mark Baugher (3)
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2019-2020
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This year-long course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20303
Second-Year Russian III

Erik Houle (1); Mark Baugher (2)
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2019-2020
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20902 / 30902
Third-Year Russian through Culture III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2019-2020
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21502 / 30302
Adv Russian Through Media-3

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Russian 21302 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Crosslists: 
REES 21502, REES 30302
Spring
2019-2020
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 10103
First-Year Russian-1

Erik Houle; Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
2018-2019
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This year-long course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 10400
Russian Through Pushkin I

Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
2018-2019
Language course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin's shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20103
Second-Year Russian-1

Erik Houle
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
2018-2019
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20702
Third-Year Russian through Culture I

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
2018-2019
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21302 / 30102
Advanced Russian Thru Media-1

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
2018-2019
Language course

This is a three-quarter sequence designed for fourth- and fifth-year students of Russian. It is also suitable for native speakers of Russian. This sequence covers various aspects of advanced Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. This sequence emphasizes the four communicative skills of listening, reading, speaking, and writing in a culturally authentic context. It builds transcultural competence by expanding students' knowledge of the language, culture, history, and daily lives of the Russian-speaking people. Vocabulary building is strongly emphasized. We add to the existing skills and develop our abilities to analyze increasingly complex texts for their meaning: to identify various styles and registers of the Russian language and to provide their neutral equivalents in standard Russian. We also work on developing our abilities to paraphrase, narrate, describe, support opinions, hypothesize, discuss abstract topics, and handle linguistically unfamiliar situations (in spoken and written format). Classes conducted in Russian. Course-specific grammar issues are covered during drill sessions (weekly) and office hours (by appointment). Oral Proficiency Interviews are conducted in the beginning and the end of the course (Autumn and Spring Quarters). Prerequisite(s): Four years of Russian, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

RUSS 10203
First-Year Russian-2

Erik Houle; Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
Russian 10103 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Winter
2018-2019
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All five major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening, comprehension, and speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 10500
Russian Through Puskin-2

Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20103 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Winter
2018-2019
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20203
Second-Year Russian-2

Erik Houle
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20103 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Winter
2018-2019

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20802
Third Year Russ: Culture-2

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20701 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions ot be arranged.
Winter
2018-2019
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21402 / 30202
Adv Russian Through Media-2

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 21302 or consent of instructor; drill sessions to be arranged
Winter
2018-2019
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 10600
Russian Through Pushkin III

Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10500.
Spring
2018-2019
Language course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin's shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 10303
First-Year Russian-3

Erik Houle; Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2018-2019
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20303
Second-Year Russian-3

Erik Houle; Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2018-2019
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20902 / 30902
Third-Year Russian through Culture III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Russian 20701 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Spring
2018-2019
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21502 / 30302
Adv Russian Through Media-3

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Russian 21302 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Crosslists: 
REES 21502; REES 30302
Spring
2018-2019
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 10103 - 10203 - 10303
First Year Russian I, II, III

Erik Houle, Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research.  All five major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening, comprehension, and speaking) are stressed.  Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions.  This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries.  Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20103 - 20203 - 20303
Second Year Russian I, II, III

Erik Houle, Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10103, 10203, 10303 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension.  Systematic study of word formation and other strategics are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating.  Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background.  Conversation practices is held twice a week.

RUSS 20702 - 20802 - 20902
Third Year Russian Culture I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20103, 20203, 20303 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions ot be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21302 - 21402 - 21502 / 30102 - 30202 - 30302
Advanced Russian Through Media I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20702, 20802, 20902 or consent of instructor; drill sessions to be arranged.
Crosslists: 
REES 21502 (Spring), REES 30302 (Spring)
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 29910 - 29911 - 29912 / 39910 - 39911 - 39912
Special Topics in Advanced Russian I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 21302/30102, 21402/30202, 21502/30302 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2017-2018
Language course

Must complete Advanced Russian through Media or equivalent, or obtain consent of instructor. Class meets for 2 hours each week.  We'll work with several topics, all of them are relevant to the general theme of "Geography and Worldview: Russian Perspective". There will be maps, reading materials, several documentaries, clips from TV programs and other media, and feature films. Class meetings will be a combination of group discussions, short presentations, and lectures. Final - one term paper at the end (in English) based on Russian materials.

RUSS 10103 - 10203 - 10303
First Year Russian I, II, III

Erik Houle, Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20103 - 20203 - 20303
Second Year Russian I, II, III

Erik Houle, Mark Baugher
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10103, 10203, 10303 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10103-10203-10303; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20702 - 20802 - 20902
Third Year Russian Culture I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20103, 20203, 20303 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions ot be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21302 - 21402 - 21502 / 30102 - 30202 - 30302
Advanced Russian Through Media I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20702, 20802, 20902 or consent of instructor; drill sessions to be arranged.
Crosslists: 
REES 21502 (Spring), REES 30302 (Spring)
Autumn Spring Winter
2016-2017
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 29910 - 29911 - 29912 / 39910 - 39911 - 39912
Special Topics in Advanced Russian I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 21302/30102, 21402/30202, 21502/30302 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged.
2016-2017
Language course

Must complete Advanced Russian through Media or equivalent, or obtain consent of instructor. Class meets for 2 hours each week.

Sping 2017: We'll work with several topics, all of them are relevant to the general theme of "Geography and Worldview: Russian Perspective".  There will be maps, reading materials, several documentaries, clips from TV programs and other media, and feature films.  Class meetings will be a combination of group discussions, short presentations, and lectures.  Final - one term paper at the end (in English) based on Russian materials.

RUSS 10103 - 10203 - 10303
First-Year Russian I, II, III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

RUSS 10103 - 10203 - 10303
Second-Year Russian I, II, III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
PQ: Russ 10300 or Consent of Instructor, Drill Sessions to be arranged.
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

RUSS 20702 - 20802 - 20902
Third-Year Russian: Culture I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
PQ: RUSS 20300 or Consent of Instructor
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

RUSS 21002 - 21102 - 21202
Fourth-Year Russian: Short Story I, II, III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
PQ: RUSS 20902 or Consent of Instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

RUSS 21302 - 21402 - 21502 / 30102 - 30202 - 30302
Advanced Russian Through Media I, II, III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
PQ: RUSS 21202 or Consent of Instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
2015-2016
Language course

RUSS 21600
Russian for Heritage Learners

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
2015-2016
Language course

RUSS 29910
Special Topics in Advanced Russian

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Must complete Advanced Russian through Media or equivalent, or obtain consent of instructor. Class meets for 2 hours each week.
Autumn
2015-2016
Language course

RUSS 10100
First-Year Russian I

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
2014-2015
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

RUSS 10200
First-Year Russian II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

RUSS 10300
First-Year Russian III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

RUSS 20100
Second-Year Russian I

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor
Autumn
2014-2015
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20200
Second-Year Russian II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20300
Second-Year Russian III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20500
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20600
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20702
Third-Year Russian through Culture I

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20300 (two years of Russian) or equivalent
Autumn
2014-2015
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20802
Third-Year Russian through Culture II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20902
Third-Year Russian through Culture III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21002
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story I

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Three years of Russian or equivalent
Autumn
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21102
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21202
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21302 / 30102
Advanced Russian through Media I

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 21002 or consent of instructor
Autumn
2014-2015
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21402 / 30202
Advanced Russian through Media II

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21502 / 30202
Advanced Russian through Media III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 25600 / 35600
Realism in Russia

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

From the 1830s to the 1890s, most Russian prose writers and playwrights were either engaged in the European-wide cultural movement known as "realistic school" which set for itself the task of engaging with social processes from the standpoint of political ideologies. The ultimate goal of this course is to distill more precise meanings of "realism," "critical realism,"and "naturalism" in nineteenth-century Russian through analysis of works by Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Aleksandr Ostrovsky, Goncharov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, and Kuprin. Texts in English and the original. Optional Russian-intensive section offered.

RUSS 25700 / 35700
Russian Literature from Modernism to Post-Modernism

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

Given the importance of the written word in Russian culture, it is no surprise that writers were full-blooded participants in Russia's tumultuous recent history, which has lurched from war to war, and from revolution to revolution. The change of political regimes has only been outpaced by the change of aesthetic regimes, from realism to symbolism, and then from socialist realism to post-modernism. We sample the major writers, texts, and literary doctrines, paying close attention to the way they responded and contributed to historical events. This course counts as the third part of the survey of Russian literature. Texts in English.

RUSS 25502 / 35502
The Russian Novel

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 25334
Autumn
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

The course will focus on three of the greatest philosophical crime novels in modern literature: Gogol’s Dead Souls, Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, and Bely’s Peterburg. Together they chart the course of development of the Russian novel, engaging literature’s essential questions, but also its “accursed” ones, as the Russians say—the ones that can never be answered, but provoke the most worthy of sort of debate.

RUSS 26208 / 36208
Literatures of Russian and African-American Soul

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
ENGL 28917, CMLT 26208, CRES 26208
Autumn
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

Among the legacies of slavery, serfdom and colonialism is the idea that dominant, Europeanized cultures have lost something essential, which can still be found in the peoples they have oppressed, and is sometimes vaguely designated by the term "soul." We consider this tendency in the Russian and American traditions, reading texts from both sides of the social and economic divide. Material includes Tolstoy, Turgenev, Douglass, Dostoevsky, DuBois, Hurston, Hughes, Platonov, Baldwin, & Solzhenitsyn—and lots of music.

RUSS 32512
Chekhov

Paul Friedrich
Course level: 
Graduate
Crosslists: 
SCTH 32512
Autumn
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

 The study of four main plays (e.g., Three Sisters) and some of the most crucial short stories (e.g., “The Hunter”). Chekhov is “an incomparable artist of life” who “created new forms,” as Tolstoy put it. Engaging and going beyond these claims, we will examine some recent American productions.

RUSS 24201 / 34201
The Return of the Soviet: War in Soviet and Post-Soviet Media (Ukraine, Belarus)

Andrei Gornykh
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMST 24406, CMST 34406
Autumn
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

The current war in Ukraine has shown dramatically the power of visual media to construct social and military conflicts, especially in the post-Soviet borderlands. Some observers believe that the media  have created a new geopolitical reality as a kind of phantasm, which explains why in the vast majority of the population in post-Soviet Russia, Belarus and eastern Ukraine support the existing power structures uncritically and even unconditionally. Taking the current situation as a cue, we seek to understand how ideological mechanisms work within visual representations, primarily in representations of war, especially in the construction of the enemy. The roots of the current Russo-Ukrainian conflict will be traced through representations of the Battle of Stalingrad in Soviet and post-Soviet cinema; the image of the partisan in Soviet and post-Soviet media; the work on film of Andrei Tarkovsky, as a symptom of the dialectic of war in Soviet modernity. The representations at issue will mostly be taken from fictional film, but attention will also be paid to other forms of cultural representation: literature, documentary film, television and new media. We will be guided by theoretical resources from critical theory (Marx, Weber, Foucault, Jameson) and psychoanalysis (Freud, Zizek).

RUSS 22302 / 32302
War and Peace

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 22301,CMLT 32301,ENGL 28912,ENGL 32302,FNDL 27103,HIST 23704
Spring
2014-2015
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 28805 / 38805
Russia, Modernity and the Everyday

Susanne Cohen
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
ANTH 21805, ANTH 31825
Winter
2014-2015

The question of modernity has long been a central preoccupation in Russia.  On the one hand, the early Soviet project was designed to conjure into being a new society marked by a distinctly socialist version of modernity.  On the other hand, the collapse of the Soviet state in effect delegitimized a particular understanding of what it meant to be modern:  Becoming post-Soviet meant not only the loss of a once promised radiant future, but often felt like a bewildering regression.  This course explores what modernity has meant for ordinary people living in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia, viewing the modern not as an objective break from “tradition,” but as a touchstone for orienting selves, practices, and understandings.  We will focus particularly on everyday life, which served as a primary target of early Soviet change efforts, a wearying reminder of the distance between utopian promises and actually existing socialism, and, in the post-Soviet era, a battleground for establishing new teleologies and new futures amid what could now triumphantly be called truly “global” capitalism.  More generally, readings in social history and the anthropology of postsocialism will provide groundwork for understanding the dramatic social transformations that have occurred in Soviet and post-Soviet Russia and the complex ways in which people have attempted to orient themselves and their everyday practices in shifting trajectories, temporalities, and directionalities.  While Russia will be our focus, we will also draw several cases from elsewhere in the former Soviet bloc with the dual aims of learning from other socialist and postsocialist experiences and exploring the considerable impact of Soviet and Russian modernizing projects on the surrounding region in the socialist period and beyond.

RUSS 10100
First-Year Russian I

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Autumn
2013-2014
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

RUSS 10200
First-Year Russian II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

RUSS 10300
First-Year Russian III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

RUSS 10400
Russian through Pushkin I

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin’s shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 10500
Russian through Pushkin II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin’s shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 10600
Russian through Pushkin III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin’s shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20100
Second-Year Russian I

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor
Autumn
2013-2014
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20200
Second-Year Russian II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor
Winter
2013-2014
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20300
Second-Year Russian III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20400
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year I

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10600
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20500
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20600
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20702
Third-Year Russian through Culture I

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20300 (two years of Russian) or equivalent
Autumn
2013-2014
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20802
Third-Year Russian through Culture II

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20902
Third-Year Russian through Culture III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21002
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story I

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Three years of Russian or equivalent
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21102
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story II

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21202
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21302 / 30102
Advanced Russian through Media I

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 21002 or consent of instructor
Autumn
2013-2014
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21402 / 30202
Advanced Russian through Media II

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21502 / 30302
Advanced Russian through Media III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 23900
Lolita

Malynne Sternstein
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 25300, ENGL 28916
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

“Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul, Lolita: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate, to tap at three on the teeth.” Popular as Nabokov’s “all-American” novel is, it is rarely discussed beyond its psychosexual profile. This intensive text-centered and discussion-based course attempts to supersede the univocal obsession with the novel’s pedophiliac plot as such by concerning itself above all with the novel’s language: language as failure, as mania, and as conjuration.

RUSS 24101 / 34101
Pushkin and His Age

Lina Steiner
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course approaches the Golden Age of Russian culture through the prism of the artistic and intellectual legacy of its most influential writer. We read and analyze Pushkin’s poetry, prose fiction, essays, and critical works in the context of the critical, philosophical, and political debates of his time. We also consider writers such as Rousseau, Montesquieu, Karamzin, Balzac, Chaadaev, and Belinsky. Texts in English or the original; classes conducted in English.

RUSS 25100
Introduction to Russian Civilization I

F. Hillis, M. Merritt
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not offered in 2014-15.
Crosslists: 
HIST 13900,SOSC 24000
Autumn
2013-2014

This two-quarter sequence provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Russian civilization. The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1880s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include: the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual, and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence is offered in alternate years.

RUSS 25200
Introduction to Russian Civilization II

R. Bird, W. Nickell
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not offered 2014-15.
Crosslists: 
HIST 14000,SOSC 24100
Winter
2013-2014

This two-quarter sequence provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Russian civilization. The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1880s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include: the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual, and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence is offered in alternate years.

RUSS 25500 / 35500
Russian Literature from Classicism to Romanticism

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Two years of Russian language
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course offers a survey of the main literary movements, schools, and genres during the period from the 1760s to the 1830s. We will explore the main works of Russian new-classical, pre-romantic, and romantic authors, including Mikhail Lomonossov, Gavriil Derzhavin, Denis Fonvizin, Nikolai Novikov, Anns Labzina, Nikolai Karamzin, Aleksandr Radischev, Vassilii Pushkin, Denis Davydov, Vassilii Zhukovskii, Alexandr Pushkin, Mikhail Lermontov, and Vladimir Odoevskii. Most texts are available in Russian as well as in translation. However, students are encouraged to read all texts in Russian.

RUSS 25600 / 35600
Realism in Russia

Lina Steiner
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

From the 1830s to the 1890s, most Russian prose writers and playwrights were either engaged in the European-wide cultural movement known as "realistic school" which set for itself the task of engaging with social processes from the standpoint of political ideologies. The ultimate goal of this course is to distill more precise meanings of "realism," "critical realism,"and "naturalism" in nineteenth-century Russian through analysis of works by Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Aleksandr Ostrovsky, Goncharov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, and Kuprin. Texts in English and the original. Optional Russian-intensive section offered.

RUSS 25700 / 35700
Russian Literature from Modernism to Post-Modernism

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

Given the importance of the written word in Russian culture, it is no surprise that writers were full-blooded participants in Russia's tumultuous recent history, which has lurched from war to war, and from revolution to revolution. The change of political regimes has only been outpaced by the change of aesthetic regimes, from realism to symbolism, and then from socialist realism to post-modernism. We sample the major writers, texts, and literary doctrines, paying close attention to the way they responded and contributed to historical events. This course counts as the third part of the survey of Russian literature. Texts in English.

RUSS 26105
Solzhenitsyn

Robert Bird
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 26105
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

Nobel Laureate in Literature in 1970, Alexander Solzhenitsyn (1918–2008) is best known as an advocate for human rights in the Soviet Union, from which he was expelled in 1974. As with Tolstoy a century before, Solzhenitsyn’s vast moral authority rested upon the reputation he gained as a novelist in the early 1960s. We will read his novels One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich and Cancer Ward as innovative and complex fictions in the tradition of the Russian novel. We will then read the first volume of his monumental Archipelago GULAG, which he called “an experiment in literary investigation,” to see how he brought his artistic talents to bear on the hidden and traumatic history of repression under Stalin. At the center of the course will be the tensions in Solzhenitsyn’s work between fiction and history, individual and society, modernity and tradition, humanism and ideology.

RUSS 26205 / 36205
Soviet Everyday Life

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 26206 / 36206
Jewish Writers in Russian Literature

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a qua
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 34504
Russian Poetry from Blok to Pasternak

R. Bird, B. Maslov
Course level: 
Graduate
Prerequisites: 
Knowledge of Russian required.
Crosslists: 
CMLT 34504
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

We will survey the selected poetry of major Russian modernists from 1900 to 1935, including lyrical and narrative genres. Poets covered include: Aleksandr Blok, Andrei Belyi, Viacheslav Ivanov, Nikolai Gumilev, Osip Mandel’shtam, Anna Akhmatova, Velimir Khlebnikov, Vladimir Mayakovsky, Marina Tsvetaeva, Boris Pasternak. In addition to tracing the development of poetic doctrines (from symbolism through acmeism and futurism), we will investigate the close correlations between formal innovation and the changing semantics of Russian poetry. Attention will also be paid to contemporary developments in Western European poetry. Knowledge of Russian required.

RUSS 34802
Faith, Doubt and Secularization in 19th-Century Russia

Lina Steiner
Course level: 
Graduate
Autumn
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 24409
The Progress of History in Film: Modes of Historical Realism in Soviet Cinema

Zdenko Mandusic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
NOTE: Course will be taught TR 3-4:20; film screenings on F 3-6:00 (updated 11/14/13)
Crosslists: 
CMST 24520
Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

How did Soviets see themselves in history? How was Soviet progress through history visually represented? Did modes of representing history in film change over time? This course will interrogate the tensions between different styles of visual and narrative representation of history and how these tensions arise from the methods and ideological implications of representing historical reality in Soviet cinema. The corpus of films for this course aims to represent a diachronic survey of Soviet cinema and its treatment of history and realism. Screenings will be supplemented with primary and secondary literature covering the first two thirds of Russian history of the twentieth century. The selected films and readings are organized to investigate how films structure the perception of history and reality in the context of the Soviet Union. We want to ask what are the aesthetic and political implications of films made between the mid-1920s and the early 1970s? How did these films represent the revolutionary history and the revolutionary present? How were they shaped by political circumstances? What is the connection between aesthetic transitions and social and political changes in Soviet culture?

We will begin with films made in the aftermath of the October Revolution, investigating how political demands and practical necessities combined to shape drastic developments in film style and the treatment of history and reality. After the revolutionary Avant-Garde films of the 1920s, we shall scrutinize the impact of Stalinism on Soviet film style. The trajectory of the course will then lead us to conclude with films of the Thaw, the period of cultural and political liberalization that followed the death of Stalin. As we move through these periods of Soviet history, we will consider how political limits, stylistic conditions, and industry developments shaped the content and form of Soviet cinema from the October Revolution to the Post-Stalinist period. As we investigate these cultural and political contexts, we also want to delineate the connections between different definitions of what Soviet cinema was supposed to be. This investigation will be based on theories regarding the film medium and will involve considering how different filmmakers emphasized particular properties of the medium. 

RUSS 25007
The Places of Memory, 1780-1880

Monica Felix
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
No prerequisites. All readings in English with optional reading groups to discuss German and Russian works in the original for all interested students.
Crosslists: 
CMLT 25007, GRMN 25014
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course will investigate the affinities between place and memory in literature. In considering works that span a century of literature, we will reflect on memory as a force that emerges as an expression of self – or nation – that is tethered to objects, places, or structures. Course readings will be drawn primarily from German, Russian, and Anglophone literatures (Eichendorff, Tieck, Hoffmann, Fet, Tiutchev, Pushkin, Elliot, Scott, Brontë, others). Supplementary readings drawn from literary criticism, philosophy, historiography, and complementary fields will help us to consider the intersection of literature and history as it relates to questions of a historically constructed subject or nation. Topics include collaborative memory, romanticism, intertextuality, historical representation, historical fiction, and nostalgia.

RUSS 10003 - 10006
Intensive Introductory Russian

Staff
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Summer
2013-2014
Language course

The RUSS 10003-10006 course sequence provides a comprehensive introduction to modern standard Russian. Students will achieve novice high to intermediate low proficiency in speaking, reading, writing, and listening and will be introduced to Russian culture and history through authentic texts, audio and video, Internet and multimedia activities, and film screenings. The course provides 140 contact hours over a 6-week period, divided into two segments of three weeks each. The RUSS 10003-10006 sequence is the equivalent of the 10100-10200-10300 sequence offered during the regular academic year at the University of Chicago.

For more information and to register, please visit the Summer Language Institute website.

RUSS 20003 - 20006
Intensive Intermediate Russian

Cori Anderson
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Summer
2013-2014
Language course

The RUSS 20003-20006 course sequence enables students to develop solid intermediate speaking, listening, reading and writing skills and further solidify their foundation in grammar and vocabulary. Students will explore Russian culture through authentic texts, audio and video, multimedia and Internet activities, and film screenings. The course provides 140 contact hours over a 6-week period, divided into two segments of three weeks each and may be FLAS eligible, depending on the student’s home institution. The RUSS 20003-20006 sequence is the equivalent of the 20100-20200-20300 sequence offered during the regular academic year at the University of Chicago.

For more information and to register, please visit the Summer Language Institute website.

RUSS 21700
Introduction to Interpretation (Russian-English, English-Russian)

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Summer
2013-2014
Language course

This course introduces students to the field of conference interpretation in general and to consecutive interpretation in particular. It emphasizes the ability to understand and analyze a message in the source language (Russian/English) and convey it in the target language (English/Russian) in a straightforward and clear manner. The course develops a student’s ability to analyze and paraphrase the meaning of a passage in the source language, and to identify the passage’s components and establish a logical relationship among them. Students will focus on active listening and concentration skills, memory enhancing techniques, and the ability to abstract information for subsequent recall. Basic elements of note-taking will be discussed as well. At the end of the course students will be able to interpret 3-5 minute extemporaneous passages on familiar topics. During practice sessions students will listen to and repeat the content of passages of increasing length and difficulty. Top
ics wil
l cover daily life, current events and the media, as well as general areas of students’ interest. PQ: Fluency in English and Russian. Students with no prior experience in interpreting will work from their “weaker” language into their stronger; students with more practice (advanced and immersion courses, time living in Russia, raised in Russian speaking households, etc.) will practice both ways.

For more information and to register, please visit the Summer Language Institute website.

RUSS 21701
Intermediate Interpretation: Consecutive and Simultaneous (Russian-English, English-Russian)

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Summer
2013-2014
Language course

This course develops skills and techniques acquired in Introduction to Interpretation. In consecutive interpretation, the following will be emphasized: clarity of expression, correct style and grammar, proper diction and presentation, and strategies for dealing with cultural and linguistic problems. Students will expand their active vocabulary to include terms and idioms frequent in extemporaneous speeches. At the end of the course students will be able to interpret extemporaneous passages of moderate difficulty derived from professional settings (sources will vary).
Basic strategies for simultaneous interpretation will be introduced, and exercises will be provided to help develop the concentration necessary for listening and speaking at the same time. The students will work to master voice management, and to acquire smooth delivery techniques. Students will learn to analyze discourse for meaning while rendering a coherent interpretation in the target language with correct grammar, diction and style. At the end of the course, students will be able to interpret 8-10 minute passages from public lectures, radio addresses, interviews, news reports, etc. PQ: Introduction to Interpretation, or equivalent; consent of the instructor. Recommended to students past 3rd year and/or heritage/ native speakers of Russian.

For more information and to register, please visit the Summer Language Institute website.

RUSS 26207 / 36207
The Transnational Subject: Jewish Writers and Russian Lit

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

Considers the experience of Jewish national subjectivity under conditions of Russian and Soviet empire in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. While attentive to practices of physical marginalization and assimilation (the Pale of Settlement, Birobidzhan), we will focus mainly on the literary record in works by Dostoevsky, Solovyov, Kovner, Babel, An-sky, Bagritsky, Grossman, Ehrenburg, and Brodsky. The syllabus also includes works in theatre, painting and film, as well as important critical texts on subjectivity and post-colonial theory.

RUSS 10100 - 10200 - 10300
First-Year Russian I, II, III

Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 10400 - 10500 - 10600
Russian through Pushkin I, II, III

Prerequisites: 
Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin's The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin's shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20100 - 20200 - 20300
Second-Year Russian I, II, III

Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10300 or consent of instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20400 - 20500 - 20600
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year I, II, III

Prerequisites: 
RUSS 10600
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20702 - 20802 - 20902
Third-Year Russian through Culture I, II, III

V.Pichugin
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 20300 (two years ofRussian) or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21002 - 21102 - 21202
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story I, II, III

Prerequisites: 
Three years of Russian or equivalent.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21302 - 21402 - 21502
Advanced Russian through Media I, II, III

V.Pichugin
Prerequisites: 
RUSS 21200 or consent of instructor.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Language course

This course, which is designedfor fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 25500 / 35500
Russian Literature from Classicism to Romanticism

L. Steiner
Autumn
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

This course offers a survey of the main literary movements, schools, and genres during the period from the 1760s to the 1830s. We will explore the main works of Russian new-classical, pre-romantic and romantic authors, including Mikhail Lomonossov, Gavriil Derzhavin, Denis Fonvizin, Nikolai Novikov, Anns Labzina, Nikolai Karamzin, Aleksandr Radischev, Vassilii Pushkin, Denis Davydov, Vassilii Zhukovskii, Alexandr Pushkin, Mikhail Lermontov and Vladimir Odoevskii. Most texts are available in Russian as well as in translation. However, students are encouraged to read all texts in Russian. The prerequisite for the course: two years of the Russian language.

RUSS 25600 / 35600
Realism in Russia

W. Nickell
Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

From the 1830s to the 1890s, most Russian prose writers and playwrights were either engaged in the European-wide cultural movement known as "realistic school," which set for itself the task of engaging with social processes from the standpoint of political ideologies. The ultimate goal of this course is to distill more precise meanings of "realism," "critical realism," and"naturalism" in nineteenth-century Russian through analysis of worksby Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Aleksandr Ostrovsky, Goncharov, Saltykov-Shchedrin, and Kuprin. Texts in English and the original. Optional Russian-intensive section offered.

RUSS 25700 / 35700
Russian Literature from Modernism to Post-Modernism

R Bird
Spring
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Given the importance of the written word in Russian culture, it is no surprise that writers were full-blooded participants in Russia's tumultuous recent history, which has lurched from war to war, and from revolution to revolution. The change of political regimes has only been outpaced by the change of aesthetic regimes, from realism to symbolism, and then from socialist realism to post-modernism. We sample the major writers, texts, and literary doctrines, paying close attention to the way they responded and contributed to historical events. This course counts as the third part of the survey of Russian literature. Texts in English.

RUSS 29600
Pale Fire

M. Sternstein
Crosslists: 
FNDL 25311
Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 29700
Reading and Research Course

Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

RUSS 29900
BA Paper

Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser.
Autumn Spring Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality grade.

RUSS 34502
The Aesthetics of Socialist Realism

R. Bird and C. Kiaer
Crosslists: 
ARTH 44502, CMST 44510
Autumn
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

Socialist Realism was declared the official mode of Soviet aesthetic culture in 1934. Though it has been dismissed within the totalitarian model as propaganda or kitsch, this seminar will approach it from the perspective of its aesthetics. By this we mean not only its visual or literary styles, but also its sensory or haptic address to its audiences. Our premise is that the aesthetic system of Socialist Realism was not simply derivative or regressive, but developed novel techniques of transmission and communication; marked by a constant theoretical reflection on artistic practice, Socialist Realism redefined the relationship between artistic and other forms of knowledge, such as science. Operating in an economy of art production and consumption diametrically opposed to the Western art market, Socialist Realism challenged the basic assumptions of Western artistic discourse, including the concept of the avant-garde. It might even be said to offer an alternate model of revolutionary cultural practice, involving the chronicling and producing of a non-capitalist form of modernity. The seminar will focus on Soviet visual art, cinema and fiction during the crucial period of the 1930s under Stalin (with readings available in translation), but we welcome students with relevant research interests that extend beyond these parameters. Conducted jointly by professors Robert Bird (Slavic and Cinemaand Media Studies, University of Chicago) and Christina Kiaer, Art History, Northwestern University, course meetings will be divided evenly between the campuses of Northwestern University and the University of Chicago.

RUSS 23501 / 33501
Bakhtin and Lotman: from Polyphony to Semiosphere

L. Steiner
Prerequisites: 
There are no prerequisites for this course.
Crosslists: 
CMLT 23502/33502
Winter
2012-2013
Literature and Linguistics course

This seminar will focus on major works by the Russian philosopher, philologist and literary theorist Mikhail Bakhtin (1895-1975), including his early philosophical work Author and Hero in Aesthetic Activity, his essays on Speech genres and the Bildungsroman, as well as his books Rabelais and His World and Problems of Dostoevsky's Poetics. We will also read contemporary scholarly studies devoted to Bakhtin and his circle (Clark&Holquist, Morson&Emerson, Tihanov etc.) In the last two weeks of the seminar we will turn to Yurii Lotman, examining his works on semiotics of culture as an original approach to literary theory and semiotics as well as a response to Bakhtin. The course is open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students. All texts are in English. Discussion and final papers are in English.

RUSS 21600
Russian for Heritage Learners

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Ability to speak Russian fluently required; formal training in Russian not required
Autumn
Language course

This course examines the major aspects of Russian grammar and stylistics essential for heritage learners. Students engage in close readings and discussions of short stories by classic and contemporary Russian authors (e.g., Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Platonov, Bulgakov, Erofeev, Tolstaya), with special emphasis on their linguistic and stylistic differences. All work in Russian.

NO LONGER OFFERED