Robert Bird

Robert Bird
Associate Professor
Foster 416
Office Hours: On Leave
773.702.8195
Ph.D., Yale University, 1998.
Teaching at UChicago since 2001
Research Interests: Aesthetic practice and theory of Russian modernism; the symbolist tradition in cinema and new media; poetry and cinema; contemporary theories of aesthetic mediation; the history of Soviet cinema; Andrei Tarkovsky

"Professor Bird has published books on Viacheslav Ivanov, Fyodor Dostoevsky and Andrei Tarkovsky, and essays on a variety of topics in Russian literature, intellectual history, film and video art."

Biography

Robert Bird’s primary area of interest is the aesthetic practice and theory of Russian/Soviet modernism. He has published books on Viacheslav Ivanov, Fyodor Dostoevsky and Andrei Tarkovsky, and essays on a variety of topics in Russian literature, intellectual history, film and video art. Recently he was co-editor (with Christina Kiaer and Zachary Cahill) of Revolution Every Day: A Calendar (Mousse Publishing, 2017), the catalogue to the exhibition Revolution Every Day at the Smart Museum of Art at the University of Chicago, on which he was co-curator. He holds a fellowship from the Neubauer Collegium for the project “Revolutionology,” an intellectual history of revolution. He is currently completing a book ‘Soul Machine: How Soviet Film Modeled Socialism,’ which analyzes the rise of socialist realism as a modeling aesthetic.

Publications

Articles

  • “Voices of History: The Narrative Poem in Russian Modernism.” Slavic and East European Journal. Forthcoming in v. 51, no.1
  • “The Suspended Aesthetic: Slavoj Žižek on Kieslowski and Tarkovsky.” Studies in East European Thought. v. 56 no. 4 (2004) 357-382.
  • “Lyric ritual and narrative myth in Russian modernism: The case of Viacheslav Ivanov,” Genre v. 36 (Spring-Summer 2003) 83-108.
  • "Minding the Gap: The Concept of Detachment in Aleksej Losev’s The Dialectic of Myth.” Studies in East European Thought v. 56 nos. 2-3 (2004). 143-160.
  • Review essay: “Russian Philosophy as Ideology.” Slavic and East European Journal 45:3 (Fall 2001) 531-7.
  • “Understanding Dostoevsky: A Comparison of Russian Hermeneutic Theories,” Dostoevsky Studies: The Journal of the International Dostoevsky Society, New Series Volume V (2001) 129-46.
  • “Viacheslav Ivanov i sovetskaia vlast’. Neizvestnye materialy” [V. Ivanov and the Soviet Government: Unknown Materials], Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie no. 40 (1999) 305-331.
  • “Martin Heidegger and Russian Symbolist Philosophy,” Studies in East European Thought 51 (1999): 85-108.

Previously Taught Courses

  • Introduction to Russian Literature (all periods)
  • Humanities Core Curriculum ("Human Being and Citizen")
  • Andrei Tarkovsky's Andrei Rublev
  • The Late Tolstoy
  • The Demons
  • The Brothers Karamazov
  • Russian and Polish Film 1956-present
  • The Soviet Imaginary
  • Poetic Cinema
  • Image, Narrative, Thought
  • The Aesthetics of Eastern Orthodoxy
  • Narratives of Suspense in Literature and Cinema
  • Marxism and Modernism
  • The Russian Narrative Poem of the 20th Century
  • Andrei Platonov