Courses

Academic Year

Slavic Department Listings

Course brochure

See also the list of past years' courses.

Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (BCSN), Czech (CZEC), East European (EEUR), Georgian (GEOR),

General Slavic (SLAV), Polish (POLI), Russian (RUSS), South Slavic (SOSL)

10300 / 31200
Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

Knowledge of a Slavic language and background in linguistics not required. The major objective of the courseis to build a solid foundation in the basic grammatical patterns of written and spoken Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian, while simultaneously introducing both the Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. This course is complemented with cultural and historical media from the Balkans and is designed for students with a wide range of interests. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

BCSN 20300 / 32200
Intermediate Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian III

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
BCSN 20200 or consent of instructor. Drill sessions to be arranged
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

The first quarter is devoted to an overview of grammar, with emphasis on verbal morphology and syntax, through the reading of a series of literary texts in both the Latin and Cyrillic alphabets. The second and third quarters are devoted to further developing active mastery of Bosian/Croatian/Serbian through continued readings, grammar drills, compositions, and conversational practice. Study of word formation, nominal and adjectival morphology, and syntax are emphasized. Screenings of movies and other audio-visual materials are held in addition to scheduled class time.

BCSN 29700
Reading and Research Course

Nada Petkovic
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Language course

CZEC 10300
Elementary Czech III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

This course is an introduction to the basic grammar of Czech with attention given to all four skills of speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as well as exposure to Czech culture. Winter and Spring Quarters include work with Czech film and literature. Students gain some familiarity with the major differences between literary and spoken Czech as they learn to use the language both as a means of communication and as a tool for reading and research.

CZEC 20300
Second-Year Czech III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

The main goal of this course is to enable students to read Czech proficiently in their particular fields. Conversation practice is included. The program is flexible and may be adjusted according to the needs of the students.

CZEC 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

CZEC 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a qu
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

SLAV 22302 / 32302
Literatures of the Christian East: Late Antiquity, Byzantium, and Medieval Russia

Boris Maslov
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
CMLT 32302,CLAS 31113,CLCV 21113,CMLT 22302
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

After the fall of Rome in 476 CE, literatures of the Latin West and—predominantly Greek-speaking—Eastern provinces of the Roman empire followed two very different paths. Covering both religious and secular genres, we will survey some of the most interesting texts written in the Christian East in the period from 330 CE (foundation of Constantinople) to the late 17th century (Westernization of Russia). Our focus throughout will be on continuities within particular styles and types of discourse (court entertainment, rhetoric, historiography, hagiography) and their functions within East Christian cultures. Readings will include Digenes Akritas and Song of Igor’s Campaign, as well as texts by Emperor Julian the Apostate, Gregory of Nazianzus, Emphraim the Syrian, Anna Comnena, Psellos, Ivan the Terrible, and Archbishop Avvakum. No prerequisites. All readings in English.

SLAV 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

SLAV 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literatures with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a quality gra
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

POLI 10300
Elementary Polish III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course teaches students to speak, read, and write in Polish, as well as familiarizes them with Polish culture. It employs the most up-to-date techniques of language teaching (e.g.,communicative and accelerated learning, and learning based on students' native language skills), as well as multileveled target-language exposure.

POLI 20300
Second-Year Polish III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

This course includes instruction in grammar, writing, and translation, as well as watching selected Polish movies. Selected readings are drawn from the course textbook, and students also read Polish short stories and press articles. In addition, the independent reading of students is emphasized and reinforced by class discussions. Work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation.

POLI 20700 / 30300
Advanced Polish III

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

Students in this course discuss selected readings (primarily short stories chosen by the instructor) in Polish during the week. The level of work is adjusted to each student's level of preparation. All work in Polish.

POLI 25303 / 35303
Kieslowski's French Cinema

Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
FNDL 25312
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

Krzysztof Kieślowski’s long-lived obsession with parallel histories and repeated chances is best illustrated by his The Double Life of Veronique. The possibility of free choice resulting in being granted a second chance conjoins this film with his French triptych White, Blue, Red, all co-written by Krzysztof Piesiewicz. In this course we discuss why and how in the Kieślowski/Piesiewicz virtual universe the possibility of reconstituting one’s identity, triggered by tragic loss and betrayal, reveals an ever-ambiguous reality. We also analyze how these concepts, posited with visually and aurally dazzling artistry, shift the popular image of Kieślowski as auteur to his viewers’ as co-creators. We read selections from current criticism on the “Three Color Trilogy.” All materials in English.

POLI 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

29900
BA Paper

Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser. Open only to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature. Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a q
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 10300
First-Year Russian III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

This course introduces modern Russian to students who would like to speak Russian or to use the language for reading and research. All four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed. Students are also introduced to Russian culture through readings, videos, and class discussions. This yearlong course prepares students for the College Language Competency Exam, for continued study of Russian in second-year courses, and for study or travel abroad in Russian-speaking countries. Conversation practice is held twice a week. 

RUSS 10600
Russian through Pushkin III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Not open to students who have taken RUSS 10100-10200-10300
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This literary and linguistic approach to Russian allows students to learn the language by engaging classic Russian poetic texts (e.g., Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman), as well as excerpts from Eugene Onegin and selections from Pushkin’s shorter poems and prose works. Although the focus is on reading Russian, all four major communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) are stressed, preparing students for the College Language Competency Exam and for continued study of Russian in second-year courses. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20300
Second-Year Russian III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

This course continues RUSS 10100-10200-10300; it includes review and amplification of grammar, practice in reading, elementary composition, and speaking and comprehension. Systematic study of word formation and other strategies are taught to help free students from excessive dependence on the dictionary and develop confidence in reading rather than translating. Readings are selected to help provide historical and cultural background. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20600
Russian through Literary Readings: Second Year III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course is a continuation of Russian through Pushkin. Second-year grammar, as well as oral and reading skills, are strengthened through intensive reading of important poetic and prose texts from the Russian classics. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 20902
Third-Year Russian through Culture III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

This course, which is intended for third-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian grammar in context and emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in a culturally authentic context. Excerpts from popular Soviet/Russian films and clips from Russian television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian; some aspects of grammar explained in English. Drill practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21202
Fourth-Year Russian through Short Story III

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course treats some difficult issues of grammar, syntax, and stylistics through reading and discussing contemporary Russian short stories. This kind of reading exposes students to contemporary Russian culture, society, and language. Vocabulary building is also emphasized. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 21502 / 30302
Advanced Russian through Media III

Valentina Pichugin
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Language course

This course, which is designed for fifth-year students of Russian, covers various aspects of Russian stylistics and discourse grammar in context. It emphasizes the four communicative skills (i.e., reading, writing, listening comprehension, speaking) in culturally authentic context. Clips from Russian/Soviet films and television news reports are shown and discussed in class. Classes conducted in Russian. Conversation practice is held twice a week.

RUSS 25700 / 35700
Russian Literature from Modernism to Post-Modernism

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

Given the importance of the written word in Russian culture, it is no surprise that writers were full-blooded participants in Russia's tumultuous recent history, which has lurched from war to war, and from revolution to revolution. The change of political regimes has only been outpaced by the change of aesthetic regimes, from realism to symbolism, and then from socialist realism to post-modernism. We sample the major writers, texts, and literary doctrines, paying close attention to the way they responded and contributed to historical events. This course counts as the third part of the survey of Russian literature. Texts in English.

RUSS 26206 / 36206
Jewish Writers in Russian Literature

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a qua
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

SOSL 26610 / 36610
The Brighter Side of the Balkans

V. Friedman, A. Ilieva
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
NEHC 20884,NEHC 30884
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

Laughter is universal but its causes are culturally determined. A joke in one culture can be a shaggy dog story in another.  The figure of the trickster occurs in many places and times and under many guises. Stereotypes can be revelatory about those who deploy them. At the same time, humor can be both an outlet and a danger. There is a special word in Russian for those sentenced to prison for telling political jokes.  This course focuses on Balkan humor, which, like the Balkans itself, is located in a space where "Western Europe", "Eastern Europe" "Central Europe" "The Mediterranean", "The Levant", and the "Near/Middle East" intersect in various ways (linguistically and culturally), compete for dominance or resist domination, and ultimately create a unique--albeit fuzzily bounded--subject of study.

In this course, we examine the poetics of laughter in the Balkans. In order to do so, we introduce humor as both cultural and transnational. We unpack the multiple layers of cultural meaning in the logic of “Balkan humor.” We also examine the functions and mechanisms of laughter, both in terms of cultural specificity and general practice and theories of humor. Thus, the study of Balkan humor will help us elucidate the “Balkan” and the “World,” and will provide insight not only into cultural mores and social relations, but into the very notion of “funny.” Our own laughter in class will be the best measure of our success – both cultural and intellectual.

SOSL 29700
Reading and Research Course

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

SOSL 29900
BA Paper

Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
Open to fourth-year students who are majoring in Slavic Languages and Literature with consent of instructor and Departmental Adviser Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course must be taken for a qua
Autumn Spring Winter
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

RUSS 25007
The Places of Memory, 1780-1880

Monica Felix
Course level: 
Undergraduate
Prerequisites: 
No prerequisites. All readings in English with optional reading groups to discuss German and Russian works in the original for all interested students.
Crosslists: 
CMLT 25007, GRMN 25014
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

This course will investigate the affinities between place and memory in literature. In considering works that span a century of literature, we will reflect on memory as a force that emerges as an expression of self – or nation – that is tethered to objects, places, or structures. Course readings will be drawn primarily from German, Russian, and Anglophone literatures (Eichendorff, Tieck, Hoffmann, Fet, Tiutchev, Pushkin, Elliot, Scott, Brontë, others). Supplementary readings drawn from literary criticism, philosophy, historiography, and complementary fields will help us to consider the intersection of literature and history as it relates to questions of a historically constructed subject or nation. Topics include collaborative memory, romanticism, intertextuality, historical representation, historical fiction, and nostalgia.

SLAV 56101
The Second World War Revisited—A Jewish Perspective

Dan Diner
Course level: 
Graduate
Crosslists: 
HIST 56101
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

The course will approach World War II with a specific "Jewish Question," so to speak. What historical, strategic, and military factors caused the fates of the Jews of Europe and the Mandatory Palestine to differ? In order to understand this and similar questions, a new view of the war and its prehistory is required. This course will consider French and British intentions in and reactions to developments in East Asia, South Asia, and the Middle East since 1919, and the entanglement of these developments with those on the European continent. The course will focus on imperial, continental, colonial, and Jewish history, and how these relate to the question of inquiry.

SLAV 23509 / 33509
Jews of Central & East-Central Europe during the Interwar Period

Dan Diner
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Crosslists: 
HIST 23509/33509
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

The course intends to lay the foundations for understanding the historical constellation of the Jews in Central and East-Central Europe in the inter-war period, 1919-1939. First, we consider the structural transformation from empires into nation-states as the backdrop of World War I and its aftershocks, especially the pogroms and anti-Jewish violence that accompanied the rise of ethnic nationalism in newly established nations-states. Next, we concentrate on the year 1919 and the Paris Peace Conference, with the minority-treaties as the "Jewish" theme. Finally, we focus on the dissolution of the political order, using the framework of the League of Nations and its repercussions on Jewish life in the region. The course focus will be to gain knowledge and historical awareness concerning Central and East-Central Jewish life; the course will also consider questions of methodology and theory of Jewish history in the modern age.

RUSS 26207 / 36207
The Transnational Subject: Jewish Writers and Russian Lit

William Nickell
Course level: 
Graduate
Undergraduate
Spring
2013-2014
Literature and Linguistics course

Considers the experience of Jewish national subjectivity under conditions of Russian and Soviet empire in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. While attentive to practices of physical marginalization and assimilation (the Pale of Settlement, Birobidzhan), we will focus mainly on the literary record in works by Dostoevsky, Solovyov, Kovner, Babel, An-sky, Bagritsky, Grossman, Ehrenburg, and Brodsky. The syllabus also includes works in theatre, painting and film, as well as important critical texts on subjectivity and post-colonial theory.